I'm only beginning to study classes, so I don't understand the basics.

I want a method to construct regex using attributes of the object:

class TEST {
    has Str $.str;

    method reg {
        return 
            rx/
               <<
               <[abc]> *
               $!str
               <!before foo>
              /;
    }         
}   

my $var = TEST.new(str => 'baz');
say $var.reg;

When trying to run this program, I get the following error message:

===SORRY!=== Error while compiling /home/evb/Desktop/p6/e.p6
Attribute $!str not available inside of a regex, since regexes are methods on Cursor.
Consider storing the attribute in a lexical, and using that in the regex.
at /home/evb/Desktop/p6/e.p6:11
------>                <!before foo>⏏<EOL>
    expecting any of:
        infix stopper

So, what's the right way to do that?

  • 2
    You probably need to build a closure with a lexical variable. See Method returning a regex in Perl 6? for more information – Håkon Hægland Apr 22 at 8:34
  • 1
    @HåkonHægland Thanks. I'd rather use EVAL. :) – Eugene Barsky Apr 22 at 8:55
  • 2
    In case the error message isn't clear... A regex is a method. Declaring a regex as you do above does the equivalent of attempting to add an anonymous method to a Match object. (The mention of Cursor is outdated -- Cursor =:= Match). So $!str refers to an attribute in Match -- but Match has no attributes. So you get a compile-time failure. – raiph Apr 22 at 10:06
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Looks like this would work:

class TEST {
    has Str $.str;

    method reg {
        my $str = $.str;
        return 
            regex {
               <<
               <[abc]> *
               $str
               <!before foo>
               }
    }         
}   

my $var = TEST.new(str => 'baz');
say $var.reg;
say "foo" ~~ $var.reg;
say "<<abaz" ~~ $var.reg

You are returning an anonymous regex, which can be used as an actual regex, as it's done in the last two sentences.

  • 1
    Thanks, it works! Is there any advantage of using an anonymous regex regex {} over regex rx//? – Eugene Barsky Apr 22 at 15:41
  • 1
    It's a bit more flexible, since a regex is actually a sub. You might want to have it using an argument, for instance. In fact, you could create just a function and curry it for returning regexes that have different parameters. – jjmerelo Apr 22 at 15:46
  • 2
    The key point in this answer is the use of a lexical alias my $str = $!str. This is because a regex is really a method that is called on the cursor (an object that belongs to the regex engine, basically), so there is no self available that could resolve the $!str attribute. Also, attributes are not part of closures, so you need the lexical alias. – moritz Apr 22 at 20:42

Using EVAL solved my problem. So, I wonder, whether there are any drawbacks in this method.

class TEST {
    has Str $.str;

    method reg {
        return
            "rx/
               <<
               <[abc]> * 
               $!str
               <!before foo>
              /".EVAL;
    }
}

my $var = TEST.new(str => 'baz');
say "abaz" ~~ $var.reg;    # abaz
say "cbazfoo" ~~ $var.reg; # Nil
  • 2
    That's a natural dynamic (run-time) solution. The obvious potential downside is it's dynamic, so slower at run-time than a compile-time solution. But imo it doesn't matter if it's understandable and fast enough for your use case. – raiph Apr 22 at 9:15
  • 1
    Thanks! In my case it's OK, It'll have to produce only about 200 such regexes. – Eugene Barsky Apr 22 at 9:31
  • 5
    N.B. While many uses of EVAL are safe, such as your use in this solution, others are not, inasmuch as they can introduce vulnerability to code injection. Fortunately Perl 6 is designed and specified in such a way that a compiler can and does detect at compile-time when usage of EVAL is dangerous in this way. If so, the compiler will refuse to compile unless you add another line to tell it to go ahead anyway. Never add or accept that line (use MONKEY-SEE-NO-EVAL;) unless you are willing to accept the challenges/consequences of doing so. – raiph Apr 22 at 10:47

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