1

When I run this, I get a java.util.ConcurrentModificationException despite me using iterator.remove();

it's obviously me adding the number 6 in the loop. Does this happen because the iterator "doesn't know" it's there and is there anyway to fix it?

public static void main(String args[]){

    List<String> list = new ArrayList<>();

    list.add("1");
    list.add("2");
    list.add("3");
    list.add("4");
    list.add("5");

    for(Iterator<String> it = list.iterator();it.hasNext();){
        String value = it.next();

        if(value.equals("4")) {
            it.remove();
            list.add("6");
        }

        System.out.println("List Value:"+value);
    }
}
8

The ConcurrentModificationException is thrown when calling String value = it.next();. But the actual culprit is list.add("6");. You mustn't modify a Collection while iterating over it directly. You are using it.remove(); which is fine, but not list.add("6");.

You can however fix this, but you'll need a ListIterator<String> to do so.

for(ListIterator<String> it = list.listIterator(); it.hasNext();){
    String value = it.next();

    if(value.equals("4")) {
        it.remove();
        it.add("6");
    }

    System.out.println("List Value:"+value);
}

This should do the trick!


And if I may offer a Java 8 alternative:

List<String> newList = list.stream()
        .map(s -> s.equals("4") ? "6" : s)
        .collect(Collectors.toList());

Here we create a Stream from your List. We map all values to themselves, only "4" gets mapped to "6" and then we collect it back into a List. But caution, newList is immutable! This is also less efficient, but a lot more elegant (imho).

0

java.util.ConcurrentModificationException is a very common exception when working with java collection classes. Java Collection classes are fail-fast, which means if the Collection will be changed while some thread is traversing over it using iterator, the iterator.next() will throw ConcurrentModificationException. Concurrent modification exception can come in case of multithreaded as well as single threaded java programming environment.

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