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I am trying to explore the kubernetes services. When I am reading the service definition I found that there is targetPort and port is specifying in service definition.

kind: Service
apiVersion: v1
metadata:
  name: my-service
spec:
  selector:
    app: MyApp
  ports:
  - protocol: TCP
    port: 80
    targetPort: 9376

Here what is the difference between the port and targetPort in kubernetes service definition? CAn anyone clarify the confusion?

82

Port: Port is the port number which makes a service visible to other services running within the same K8s cluster. In other words, in case a service wants to invoke another service running within the same Kubernetes cluster, it will be able to do so using port specified against “port” in the service spec file.

Target Port: Target port is the port on the POD where the service is running.

Nodeport: Node port is the port on which the service can be accessed from external users using Kube-Proxy. Take a look at following spec defining a sample service:

        apiVersion: v1
        kind: Service
        metadata:
          name: test-service
        spec:
          ports:
          - port: 8080
            targetPort: 8170
            nodePort: 33333
            protocol: TCP 
          selector:
            component: test-service-app

Pay attention to some of the following in above spec:

The port is 8080 which represents that test-service can be accessed by other services in the cluster at port 8080. The targetPort is 8170 which represents the test-service is actually running on port 8170 on pods The nodePort is 33333 which represents that test-service can be accessed via kube-proxy on port 33333.

  • 1
    Reading some of the comments in the client code, they mention that targetPort is optional. So how does kubernetes decide what port of the pod to expose? Does it default to a particular value? – harpratap Sep 10 '18 at 7:42
  • 6
    "By default the targetPort will be set to the same value as the port field." (kubernetes.io/docs/concepts/services-networking/service/…). So by default, Kubernetes assumes the port that's exposed inside the cluster, is the same as the port exposed directly by the pod. – weeknie Sep 14 '18 at 14:23
  • Properly broken down . – I.Tyger Apr 15 at 22:06
2

Service: This directs the traffic to a pod.

TargetPort: This is the actual port on which your application is running on the container.

Port: Some times your application inside container serves different services on a different port. Ex:- the actual application can run 8080 and health checks for this application can run on 8089 port of the container. So if you hit the service without port it doesn't know to which port of the container it should redirect the request. Service needs to have a mapping so that it can hit the specific port of the container.

kind: Service
apiVersion: v1
metadata:
  name: my-service
spec:
  selector:
    app: MyApp
  ports:
    - name: http
      nodePort: 30475
      port: 8089
      protocol: TCP
      targetPort: 8080
    - name: metrics
      nodePort: 31261
      port: 5555
      protocol: TCP
      targetPort: 5555
    - name: health
      nodePort: 30013
      port: 8443
      protocol: TCP
      targetPort: 8085 

if you hit the my-service:8089 the traffic is routed to 8080 of the container(targetPort). Similarly, if you hit my-service:8443 then it is redirected to 8085 of the container(targetPort).

But this myservice:8089 is internal to the kubernetes cluster and can be used when one application wants to communicate with another application. So to hit the service from outside the cluster someone needs to expose the port on the host machine on which kubernetes is running so that the traffic is redirected to a port of the container. In that can use nodePort.

From the above example, you can hit the service from outside the cluster(Postman or any restclient) by host_ip:Nodeport

Say your host machine ip is 10.10.20.20 you can hit the http,metrics,health services by 10.10.20.20:30475,10.10.20.20:31261,10.10.20.20:30013

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