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I found some answers online, but I have no experience with regular expressions, which I believe is what is needed here.

I have a string that needs to be split by either a ';' or ', ' That is, it has to be either a semicolon or a comma followed by a space. Individual commas without trailing spaces should be left untouched

Example string:

"b-staged divinylsiloxane-bis-benzocyclobutene [124221-30-3], mesitylene [000108-67-8]; polymerized 1,2-dihydro-2,2,4- trimethyl quinoline [026780-96-1]"

should be split into a list containing the following:

('b-staged divinylsiloxane-bis-benzocyclobutene [124221-30-3]' , 'mesitylene [000108-67-8]', 'polymerized 1,2-dihydro-2,2,4- trimethyl quinoline [026780-96-1]') 
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5 Answers 5

1182

Luckily, Python has this built-in :)

import re
re.split('; |, ', string_to_split)

Update:
Following your comment:

>>> a='Beautiful, is; better*than\nugly'
>>> import re
>>> re.split('; |, |\*|\n',a)
['Beautiful', 'is', 'better', 'than', 'ugly']
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  • 27
    I'd prefer to write it as: re.split(r';|,\s', a) by replacing ' ' (space character) with '\s' (white space) unless space character is a strict requirement. Sep 12, 2013 at 20:51
  • 102
    I wonder why (regular) split just can't accept a list, that seems like a more obvious way instead of encoding multiple options in a line.
    – himself
    Jun 12, 2014 at 16:02
  • 12
    It is worth nothing that this uses some RegEx like things as mentioned above. So trying to split a string with . will split every single character. You need to escape it. \.
    – marsh
    Nov 14, 2016 at 15:38
  • 66
    Just to add to this a little bit, instead of adding a bunch of or "|" symbols you can do the following: re.split('[;,.\-\%]',str), where inside of [ ] you put all the characters you want to split by.
    – jmracek
    Nov 6, 2017 at 21:31
  • 4
    Is there a way to retain the delimiters in the output but combine them together? I know that doing re.split('(; |, |\*|\n)', a) will retain the delimiters, but how can I combine subsequent delimiters into one element in the output list?
    – Konstantin
    Jul 20, 2020 at 14:35
453

Do a str.replace('; ', ', ') and then a str.split(', ')

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  • 43
    +1; very specific and to the point, not generic. Which is often better. Sep 6, 2012 at 9:22
  • 90
    suppose you have a 5 delimeters, you have to traverse your string 5x times
    – om-nom-nom
    Sep 26, 2012 at 23:23
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    that is very bad for performance Nov 26, 2012 at 18:04
  • 28
    This shows a different vision of yours toward this problem. I think it is a great one. "If you don't know a direct answer, use combination of things you know to solve it".
    – AliBZ
    Jul 23, 2013 at 18:04
  • 33
    If you have small number of delimiters and are perormance-constrained, replace trick is fastest of all. 15x faster than regexp, and almost 2x faster than nested for in val.split(...) generator.
    – monoid
    May 23, 2016 at 7:36
175

Here's a safe way for any iterable of delimiters, using regular expressions:

>>> import re
>>> delimiters = "a", "...", "(c)"
>>> example = "stackoverflow (c) is awesome... isn't it?"
>>> regex_pattern = '|'.join(map(re.escape, delimiters))
>>> regex_pattern
'a|\\.\\.\\.|\\(c\\)'
>>> re.split(regex_pattern, example)
['st', 'ckoverflow ', ' is ', 'wesome', " isn't it?"]

re.escape allows to build the pattern automatically and have the delimiters escaped nicely.

Here's this solution as a function for your copy-pasting pleasure:

def split(delimiters, string, maxsplit=0):
    import re
    regex_pattern = '|'.join(map(re.escape, delimiters))
    return re.split(regex_pattern, string, maxsplit)

If you're going to split often using the same delimiters, compile your regular expression beforehand like described and use RegexObject.split.


If you'd like to leave the original delimiters in the string, you can change the regex to use a lookbehind assertion instead:

>>> import re
>>> delimiters = "a", "...", "(c)"
>>> example = "stackoverflow (c) is awesome... isn't it?"
>>> regex_pattern = '|'.join('(?<={})'.format(re.escape(delim)) for delim in delimiters)
>>> regex_pattern
'(?<=a)|(?<=\\.\\.\\.)|(?<=\\(c\\))'
>>> re.split(regex_pattern, example)
['sta', 'ckoverflow (c)', ' is a', 'wesome...', " isn't it?"]

(replace ?<= with ?= to attach the delimiters to the righthand side, instead of left)

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89

In response to Jonathan's answer above, this only seems to work for certain delimiters. For example:

>>> a='Beautiful, is; better*than\nugly'
>>> import re
>>> re.split('; |, |\*|\n',a)
['Beautiful', 'is', 'better', 'than', 'ugly']

>>> b='1999-05-03 10:37:00'
>>> re.split('- :', b)
['1999-05-03 10:37:00']

By putting the delimiters in square brackets it seems to work more effectively.

>>> re.split('[- :]', b)
['1999', '05', '03', '10', '37', '00']
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  • 18
    It works for all the delimiters you specify. A regex of - : matches exactly - : and thus won't split the date/time string. A regex of [- :] matches -, <space>, or : and thus splits the date/time string. If you want to split only on - and : then your regex should be either [-:] or -|:, and if you want to split on -, <space> and : then your regex should be either [- :] or -| |:. Feb 21, 2013 at 23:11
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    @alldayremix I see my mistake: I missed the fact that your regex contains the OR |. I blindly identified it as a desired separator.
    – Paul
    Apr 4, 2013 at 11:15
37

This is how the regex look like:

import re
# "semicolon or (a comma followed by a space)"
pattern = re.compile(r";|, ")

# "(semicolon or a comma) followed by a space"
pattern = re.compile(r"[;,] ")

print pattern.split(text)
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