17

I have a base model:

public abstract class Status
{
     public string updateUserName { get; set; }
}

Then a model which extends the base model defined above:

public class Item : Status
{
     public int Id { get; set; }
     public string Description { get; set; }
}

Then I have defined configuration classes for each:

public class ItemConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Item>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Item> builder)
    {
        builder.ToTable("Item", "dbo").HasKey(c => c.Id);
        builder.Property(c => c.Description).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(100);
    }
}

public class StatusConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Status>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Status> builder)
    {
        builder.Property(c => c.updateUserName).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(50);
    }

Now, I have the following Context class:

public class TestDbContext : DbContext
{
    public TestDbContext(DbContextOptions<TestDbContext> options) : base(options)
    {
    }

    public DbSet<Item> Item { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.ApplyConfiguration(new ItemConfiguration());
    }
}

I'm trying to figure out how to apply the Status model configurations defined in the StatusConfiguration class to all the models that extend to it (only one in this example: Item). I would like to avoid defining the same Status model configuration every time it gets used. The Status model will essentially be meta data associated with each Item record (i.e. one Item table in database containing all properties defined in both models; nothing more, and nothing less).

For example, my current implementation is the following ItemConfiguration class without using the StatusConfiguration class:

public class ItemConfiguration : IEntityTypeConfiguration<Item>
{
    public void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Item> builder)
    {
        builder.ToTable("Item", "dbo").HasKey(c => c.Id);
        builder.Property(c => c.Description).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(100);
        builder.Property(c => c.updateUserName).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(50);
    }
}

That current implementation works correctly and migrates to the database as intended. I'm simply looking for a more manageable way going forward.

My assumption is that I could extend the ItemConfiguration class to include the StatusConfiguration class but cannot find an example of that method online. I'm hoping someone with a little more experience could kindly point me in the right direction?

Let me know if additional information would be helpful.

42

If I understand correctly, the Status is just a base class and not a base entity participating in Database Inheritance.

In such case it's important to never refer to Status class directly inside entity model and configuration, i.e. no DbSet<Status>, no navigation properties of type Status or ICollection<Status>, no modelBuilder.Entity<Status>() calls and no IEntityTypeConfiguration<Status>.

Instead, you always have to refer to the concrete types inheriting from the Status. In order to reuse configuration code, you should use constrained generic methods or classes and pass the concrete entity types.

Since you are using IEntityTypeConfiguration classes, probably the most natural is to make your StatusConfiguration class generic:

public class StatusConfiguration<TEntity> : IEntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity>
    where TEntity : Status
{
    public virtual void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<TEntity> builder)
    {
        builder.Property(c => c.updateUserName).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(50);
    }
}

and let derived entity configuration classes derive from it:

public class ItemConfiguration : StatusConfiguration<Item>
{
    public override void Configure(EntityTypeBuilder<Item> builder)
    {
        base.Configure(builder); // <--
        builder.ToTable("Item", "dbo").HasKey(c => c.Id);
        builder.Property(c => c.Description).IsRequired().HasMaxLength(100);
    }
}
7
  • 1
    You hit the nail on the head. I was specifically seeking how to implement that constrained generic method and pass concrete entity types. Thank you so much for your time! – TheDirtyJenks Apr 24 '18 at 22:24
  • 1
    @Ivan how would I do that without leveraging the IEntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity> ?stackoverflow.com/questions/53275567/… – ibubi Nov 15 '18 at 18:15
  • 1
    @ibubi I've posted the answer there. – Ivan Stoev Nov 15 '18 at 19:18
  • 1
    Thank you for this! I was trying and could not get it to work. I initially missed the "base.Configure..." entry, adding that and it all works perfectly. – user1489765 Jul 3 '19 at 19:57
  • 1
    Great answer - this helped me a lot. Thanks! – Ed Graham Jul 11 '19 at 13:48

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