16

Disclaimer: overly simplified functions follow, I'm aware they're useless

function thinger<T>(thing: T): T {
    return thing;
}

const thing = thinger({ a: "lol" });

thing.a;

The above code transpiles just fine. But I need to place result of thinger<T> into an object.

interface ThingHolder {
    thing: ReturnType<typeof thinger>;
}

const myThingHolder: ThingHolder = {
    thing: thinger({ a: "lol" }),
};

However I have lost my type information so myThingHolder.thing.a does not work

Property 'a' does not exist on type '{}'

So I tried the following

interface ThingHolder<T> {
    thing: ReturnType<typeof thinger<T>>;
}

const myThingHolder: ThingHolder<{ a: string }> = {
    thing: thinger({ a: "lol" }),
};

But typeof thinger<T> is not valid typescript.

How can I get the return type of a function which has a different return type based on generics?

7
  • 1
    And what's wrong with figuring it out yourself? interface ThingHolder<T> { thing: T } ?
    – jcalz
    Apr 24 '18 at 15:56
  • 2
    As in my disclaimer at the beginning of my post, I realise in this overly simplified example I should do that, but my actual use case is not so simple. I have a function accepting many generics and returning something more complex than simply those generics (but the generics still affect the return type)
    – ed'
    Apr 24 '18 at 15:58
  • 3
    I could write it, but it would be extremely verbose and require re-writing every time the function changes. To be honest, even if it was a reasonable solution, I would still like an answer to this question.
    – ed'
    Apr 24 '18 at 16:03
  • 2
    The short answer is going to be "TypeScript can't do that" because it has neither generic values, higher kinded types, nor typeof on arbitrary expressions.
    – jcalz
    Apr 24 '18 at 16:06
  • 2
    It isn't my function, it is a library's. I'm only interested in an answer to my question, which is a way to get the return type of a function whose return type is affected by generics. Alternatively an explanation as to why this is not possible would suffice. If it is not possible, I have simpler ways to resolve my use case. But if it is possible, I would prefer to do it that way.
    – ed'
    Apr 24 '18 at 16:42
12

I might as well put this in an answer although it doesn't look like it will meet your needs. TypeScript currently has neither generic values, higher kinded types, nor typeof on arbitrary expressions. Generics in TypeScript are sort of "shallow" that way. So as far as I know there's unfortunately no way to describe a type function that plugs type parameters into generic functions and checks the result:

// doesn't work, don't try it
type GenericReturnType<F, T> = F extends (x: T) => (infer U) ? U : never

function thinger<T>(thing: T): T {
  return thing;
}

// just {}, 🙁
type ReturnThinger<T> = GenericReturnType<typeof thinger, T>;

So all I can do for you is suggest workarounds. The most obvious workaround would be to use a type alias to describe what thinger() returns, and then use it multiple places. This is a "backwards" version of what you want; instead of extracting the return type from the function, you build the function from the return type:

type ThingerReturn<T> = T; // or whatever complicated type you have

// use it here
declare function thinger<T>(thing: T): ThingerReturn<T>;

// and here
interface ThingHolder<T> {
  thing: ThingerReturn<T>;
}

// and then this works 🙂 
const myThingHolder: ThingHolder<{ a: string }> = {
  thing: thinger({ a: "lol" }),
};

Does that help? I know it's not what you wanted, but hopefully it's at least a possible path forward for you. Good luck!

4
0

Probably this would solve the problem. But you need to create a fake class. It works because classes are types and JS-runtime objects at the same time.

// generic function
// we want to get its result, but we cannot do it like
// ReturnType<typeof foo<T>()> // syntax error
const foo = <T,>(arg: T) => ({ test: arg });
// so, let's create a parametric class
class Wrapper<T> {
  // with the only method that uses our "foo"
  wrapped = (arg: T) => foo(arg);   
};
// due to the fact that class is a type we can use it as a type 
// with a generic parameter.
type GetFooResult<T> = ReturnType<Wrapper<T>['wrapped']>
type Bingo = GetFooResult<number>; // { test: number }

TS Playground link. Based on this answer. Thx to @Colin

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