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I'm in the process of writing a Lambda function that processes events from a DynamoDB stream.

This page on DynamoDB Streams and AWS Lambda Triggers says:

AWS Lambda polls the stream and invokes your Lambda function synchronously when it detects new stream records.

Why synchronously rather than asynchronously?

In particular, what happens to the output of a Lambda function that's processing DynamoDB stream events? Is it just discarded, or does something actually consume this value?

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Why synchronously rather than asynchronously?

Because it needs to wait until new stream records are done with being written to DynamoDB and then invoke the Lambda. That's why it is synchronously.

In particular, what happens to the output of a Lambda function that's processing DynamoDB stream events? Is it just discarded, or does something actually consume this value?

Depends on what your Lambda does, the output may be stored in S3 or passed to another Lamdba as input or used by other service.

  • What determines where the output goes? Just in case it wasn't clear, by "output" I'm talking about the return value of the handler in my Lambda function. – Laurence Gonsalves Apr 24 '18 at 20:15
  • Are you saying stream events for a DynamoDB table are created before the table is written to? I thought the stream event was created after the write to DynamoDB. – Laurence Gonsalves Apr 25 '18 at 0:55
  • @dsharp I think you'll find that it's because they need to be handled in order. With asynchronous Lambda invocations, there isn't a guarantee of ordering. Synchronous puts the burden on the invoker (coincidentally, here, that is a component of the Lambda service itself) to check for errors and retry, preserving the established ordering of the events. The output is still discarded, but you might say it's discarded into a different bit bucket. – Michael - sqlbot Apr 25 '18 at 12:27
  • @Michael-sqlbot Ok, so they're synchronous because of the (per-shard) ordering constraint, but the return value is essentially ignored. Does that sound right? – Laurence Gonsalves Apr 25 '18 at 17:58
  • @LaurenceGonsalves yes, it does. – Michael - sqlbot Apr 25 '18 at 18:23

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