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I declare a Algebra.h file which holds the declaration of an add() function:

#ifndef Algebra_
#define Algebra_

namespace Algebra{

int add(int x, int y);

}
#endif

Then I implement add() as:

Algebra.cpp

#include "Algebra.h"

namespace Algebra{

int add(int x, int y){
  return x+y;
}

}

Then I have classes A and B, which include Algebra.h:

B.h

#ifndef B_
#define B_

#include "Algebra.h"
#include <iostream>

class B{
public:
  void func(int x, int y);
};

#endif

B.cpp

#include "B.h"

void B::func(int x, int y){
  int val =  Algebra::add(x,y);
  std::cout << "B : "<< val << std::endl;
}

A.h

#ifndef A_
#define A_

#include <iostream>

#include "Algebra.h"
#include "B.h"

class A{
public:
  void func(int x, int y);
};

#endif

A.cpp

#include "A.h"    

void A::func(int x, int y){
  int val =  Algebra::add(x,y);
  std::cout << "A : " << val << std::endl;
}

main.cpp

#include "A.h"
#include "B.h"
#include "Algebra.h"

int main(){
  A a;
  B b;
  a.func(3,4);
  b.func(3,4);
  int val = Algebra::add(3,4);
  std::cout << "main : " << val << std::endl;
}

I tried compilation using

  1. g++ A.cpp B.cpp main.cpp -o bin

  2. g++ A.cpp B.cpp Algebra.cpp main.cpp -o bin

I get this error:

/tmp/ccBXhev4.o: In function 'Algebra::add(int, int)': main.cpp:(.text+0x0): multiple definition of 'Algebra::add(int, int)' /tmp/ccfaCF5H.o:A.cpp:(.text+0x0): first defined here collect2: error: ld returned 1 exit status

I even tried inlining the add() function in Algebra, but still get the error. Also I don't want to make Algebra be a class.

Why am I getting a multiple definition error even though I am adding the Algebra header file, and it does not define but only declare?

  • inline int add( int x, int y){ return x+y; } – Thomas Apr 24 '18 at 18:27
  • I tried that too but still get the error. – mato Apr 24 '18 at 18:36
  • 2
    1) is missing Algebra.cpp 2) works for me – Thomas Apr 24 '18 at 18:54
  • 1
    Note that you are not managing your headers correctly. <iostream> and Algebra.h should be moved from A.h and B.h to A.cpp and B.cpp, since they are not actually used in the .h files but only in the .cpp files. And B.h should be removed from A.h since B is not used by A. And <iostream> should be added to main.cpp. Use headers explicitly, only where they are actually needed, do not rely on headers being included implicitly, and do not include headers you do not need. – Remy Lebeau Apr 24 '18 at 19:32
  • 1
    @mato It is to avoid introducing dependencies where they do not belong and are not needed. And yes, that also helps to speed up compiling – Remy Lebeau Apr 24 '18 at 22:49

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