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I have a slightly unusual problem with transaction state and error handling in SQLAlchemy. The short version: is there any way of preserving a transaction when SQLAlchemy raises a ProgrammingError and aborts it?

Background

I'm working on an integration test suite for a legacy codebase. Right now, I'm designing a set of fixtures that will allow us to run all tests inside transactions, inspired by the SQLAlchemy documentation. The general paradigm involves opening a connection, starting a transaction, binding a session to that connection, and then mocking out most database access methods so that they make use of that transaction. (To get a sense of what this looks like, see the code provided in the docs link above, including the note at the end.) The goal is to allow ourselves to run methods from the codebase that perform a lot of database updates in the context of a test, with the assurance that any side effects that happen to alter the test database will get rolled back after the test has completed.

My problem is that the code often relies on handling DBAPI errors to accomplish control flow when running queries, and those errors automatically abort transactions (per the psycopg2 docs). This poses a problem, since I need to preserve the work that has been done in that transaction up to the point that the error is raised, and I need to continue using the transaction after the error handling is done.

Here's a representative method that uses error handling for control flow:

from api.database import engine

def entity_count(): 
    """
    Count the entities in a project.
    """

    get_count = ''' 
        SELECT COUNT(*) AS entity_count FROM entity_browser 
    ''' 

    with engine.begin() as conn:
        try: 
            count = conn.execute(count).first().entity_count 
        except ProgrammingError: 
            count = 0 

return count 

In this example, the error handling provides a quick way of determining if the table entity_browser exists: if not, Postgres will throw an error that gets caught at the DBAPI level (psycopg2) and passed up to SQLAlchemy as a ProgrammingError.

In the tests, I mock out engine.begin() so that it always returns the connection with the ongoing transaction that was established in the test setup. Unfortunately, this means that when the code continues execution after SQLAlchemy has raised a ProgrammingError and psycopg2 has aborted the transaction, SQLAlchemy will raise an InternalError the next time a database query runs using the open connection, complaining that the transaction has been aborted.

Here's a sample test exhibiting this behavior:

import sqlalchemy as sa

def test_entity_count(session):
    """
    Test the `entity_count` method.

    `session` is a fixture that sets up the transaction and mocks out
    database access, returning a Flask-SQLAlchemy `scoped_session` object
    that we can use for queries.
    """

    # Make a change to a table that we can observe later
    session.execute('''
        UPDATE users
        SET name = 'in a test transaction'
        WHERE id = 1
    ''')

    # Drop `entity_browser` in order to raise a `ProgrammingError` later
    session.execute('''DROP TABLE entity_browser''')

    # Run the `entity_count` method, making sure that it raises an error
    with pytest.raises(sa.exc.ProgrammingError):
        count = entity_count()

    assert count == 0

    # Make sure that the changes we made earlier in the test still exist
    altered_name = session.execute('''
        SELECT name
        FROM users
        WHERE id = 1
    ''')

    assert altered_name == 'in a test transaction'

Here's the type of output I get:

> altered_name = session.execute('''
      SELECT name
      FROM users
      WHERE id = 1
  ''')

[... traceback history...]

def do_execute(self, cursor, statement, parameters, context=None):
>   cursor.execute(statement, parameters)
E   sqlalchemy.exc.InternalError: (psycopg2.InternalError) current transaction is
    aborted, commands ignored until end of transaction block

Attempted solutions

My first instinct was to try to interrupt the error handling and force a rollback using SQLAlchemy's handle_error event listener. I added a listener into the test fixture that would roll back the raw connection (since SQLAlchemy Connection instances have no rollback API, as far as I understand it):

@sa.event.listens_for(connection, 'handle_error')
def raise_error(context):
    dbapi_conn = context.connection.connection
    dbapi_conn.rollback()

This successfully keeps the transaction open for further use, but ends up rolling back all of the previous changes made in the test. Sample output:

> assert altered_name == 'in a test transaction'
E AssertionError

Clearly, rolling back the raw connection is too aggressive of an approach. Thinking that I might be able to roll back to the last savepoint, I tried rolling back the scoped session, which has an event listener attached to it that automatically opens up a new nested transaction when a previous one ends. (See the note at the end of the SQLAlchemy doc on transactions in tests for a sample of what this looks like.)

Thanks to the mocks set up in the session fixture, I can import the scoped session directly into the event listener and roll it back:

@sa.event.listens_for(connection, 'handle_error')
def raise_error(context):
    from api.database import db
    db.session.rollback()

However, this approach also raises an InternalError on the next query. It seems that it doesn't actually rollback the transaction to the satisfaction of the underlying cursor.

Summary question

Is there any way of preserving the transaction after a ProgrammingError gets raised? On a more abstract level, what is happening when psycopg2 "aborts" the transaction, and how can I work around it?

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  • Should you not mock engine.begin() in the same fashion as you've setup your session following the advice at the end of the linked docs? So instead of it returning the connection with the ongoing transaction that was established in the test setup, it should return said connection but with a nested transaction established, which is then rolled back if need be, and a new one started. – Ilja Everilä Apr 25 '18 at 9:14
  • 1
    That would definitely be an improvement to my current approach, @IljaEverilä! But it seems like the root problem remains: how can I roll back to that savepoint? Even changing the mock so that engine.begin() opens a new nested transaction, when I roll back the session it continues to raise a current transaction is aborted error on the next query, and rolling back the raw connection rolls back all open transactions, including the parent. – jeancochrane Apr 25 '18 at 14:59
  • 1
    i am not sure if your existence check is part of your testing framework or what's under test. however, what i did to avoid similar issues was to run my own existence/sql syntax tests on a 2nd connection. – JL Peyret Apr 26 '18 at 0:40
  • I'm going to advocate that we do something similar to that moving forward @JLPeyret, but I'd like to see if there's a way of isolating the tests without having to make major changes to the existing codebase. – jeancochrane Apr 26 '18 at 14:12
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The root of the problem is that you're hiding the exception from the context manager. You catch the ProgrammingError too soon and so the with-statement never sees it. Your entity_count() should be:

def entity_count(): 
    """
    Count the entities in a project.
    """

    get_count = ''' 
        SELECT COUNT(*) AS entity_count FROM entity_browser 
    ''' 

    try:
        with engine.begin() as conn:
            count = conn.execute(get_count).first().entity_count

    except ProgrammingError: 
        count = 0 

return count

And then if you provide something like

@contextmanager     
def fake_begin():
    """ Begin a nested transaction and yield the global connection.
    """
    with connection.begin_nested(): 
        yield connection

as the mocked engine.begin(), the connection stays usable. But @JL Peyret raises a good point about the logic of your test. Engine.begin() usually1 provides a new connection with an armed transaction from the pool, so your session and entity_count() shouldn't probably even be using the same connection.

1: Depends on pool configuration.

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  • This indeed fixed the problem! I'm still unsure whether it's possible to preserve an aborted transaction, but since this solution fixed my particular problem, I'm counting it as resolved. Thanks for all your help! – jeancochrane Apr 26 '18 at 18:58
  • 1
    From the psycopg2 faq: "The database will not recover automatically from this condition: you must run a rollback() before sending new commands to the session (if this seems too harsh, remember that PostgreSQL supports nested transactions using the SAVEPOINT command)." – Ilja Everilä Apr 26 '18 at 19:14

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