1

For a project i was to trying to do this:

  • Using powershell, open an excel file. (Done)
  • Refresh the table with a data connection to a website. (Done)
  • Save refreshed Excel in the same path.(Done)
  • Convert that file into a CSV used to be loaded into SQL Server (epic fail)

Powershell save the file with the comma separator, not with the semicolon:

#Refresh Excel
$app = New-Object -comobject Excel.Application
$app.Visible = $false
$wb = $app.Workbooks.Open("C:\test\test.xlsm")
$wb.Name
$wb.RefreshAll()
$wb.Save()
$wb.Close()
$app.Quit()

#Export To CSV
Function ExportWSToCSV ($excelFileName, $csvLoc)
{
    $excelFile = "C:\test\" + $excelFileName + ".xlsm"
    $E = New-Object -ComObject Excel.Application
    $E.Visible = $false
    $E.DisplayAlerts = $false
    $wb = $E.Workbooks.Open($excelFile)
    foreach ($ws in $wb.Worksheets)
    {
        $n = $excelFileName + "_" + $ws.Name
        write-host $n
        write-host ($csvLoc + $n + ".csv")
        $ws.SaveAs($csvLoc + $n + ".csv",6)
    }
    $E.Quit()
}

ExportWSToCSV -excelFileName "test" -csvLoc "C:\test\new\"

I need also how to bulk insert data into a table in SQL Server...

Thanks in advance!

3
  • So basically, you are trying to convert XLSX into CSV. See if this is of any value to you. Apr 25 '18 at 7:48
  • I already done that, the thing is that i want the semicolon as separator, not the comma. Apr 25 '18 at 8:03
  • It's Excel issue, not Powershell. Excel CSV export is rather horrendous, you can't select the separator and encoding is easily messed up. If the separator is only issue you could change decimal separator to comma in Excel settings, and it will use semicolon as field separator. Otherwise I would create custom PSObject from each row of the table and create the CSV file with Export-Csv Cmdlet. Apr 25 '18 at 8:15
3

To save a CSV using semicolon as separator instead of comma try specifying a $true value for local parameter for the SaveAs metohd:

$ws.SaveAs($csvLoc + $n + ".csv",6, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, $true)

instead of:

$ws.SaveAs($csvLoc + $n + ".csv",6)

This is an excerpt from MSDN explaining the local parameter (more info here):

Local

Type: System.Object

true saves files against the language of Excel (including control panel settings); false (default) saves files against the language of Visual Basic for Applications (VBA).

To bulk insert you CSV files into SQL Server (in this example my CSV file has only 2 columns):

IF  OBJECT_ID('dbo.IMPORT_FROM_CSV') IS NOT NULL
DROP TABLE dbo.IMPORT_FROM_CSV 

CREATE TABLE dbo.IMPORT_FROM_CSV (
  [COL_1]            [VARCHAR] (max) NULL,
  [COL_2]            [VARCHAR] (max) NULL
)

BULK INSERT dbo.IMPORT_FROM_CSV
FROM 'C:\test\new\test_Sheet1.csv'
WITH (
 FIRSTROW = 2,
 FIELDTERMINATOR = ';',
 ROWTERMINATOR = '\n'
)
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  • 1
    This answer came in handy for something else. I was using Powershell to convert .XLSX to .CSV on a British system and dates were coming out in American format, even though the input Spreadsheet had them in British and the server was configured as British! Adding the " , 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, $true " parameters to the .SaveAs command in PowerShell resolved the issue and forced it to output in British format. Thanks! Feb 3 '20 at 16:20
0

When I am running into seperators problems I just add two lines to my code in general

(Get-Content -Path "C:\test\new\test.csv") | % {$_ -replace ';' , '|'}|
Out-File -FilePath "C:\test\new\test.csv" -Encoding UTF8

you can adjust your seperators and replace them, I use the '|' one because it is difficult to find as part of a text.

Hope this helps you.

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