22

Let's say I have this project structure:

proj/
├── docker
│   └── myservice
│       └── Dockerfile
└── docker-compose.yml

And this is my docker-compose.yml:

version: '3'

services:

  master:
      build: docker/myservice

  slave:
      image: proj_master
      depends_on: master

I want the master service to create an image, which will be used by the master and the slave services (with different parameters, not shown here). By trial and error I have found out that the slave must refer to the image proj_master.

  • Where is this documented?
  • Why do I need to make a reference to the proj? Usually a docker composer file is agnostic related to where it is located ...
25

Docker Compose builds your image with the name proj_master, beacuse you did not specify an image name under your master service in the Compose file.

You have a build section, so Docker Compose will build the image and give it a name based on your <directory_name_where_you_run_compose>_<service_name>:latest. I did not find this in the documentation, but tried with one of my projects, and it's in line with what you experienced.

You can fix your project by specifying the image name in your Compose file and using the same image for both services:

version: '3'


services:

  master:
      build: docker/myservice
      image: username/masterimage:version


  slave:
      image: username/masterimage:version
      depends_on: master
5
  • 2
    can we use build and image together ?! – Mahdi Imani Sep 29 '19 at 6:00
  • 1
    @MahdiImani what do you mean together? We usually use build and image together under the same service. build tells docker how to build and image tells docker what the image name should be. They are sort of together :) What more are you trying to acieve? – takacsmark Sep 29 '19 at 6:44
  • 2
    tried this but it fails on pull as it tries to pull an nonexistent image – dalore Jun 29 '20 at 9:04
  • @dalore Exactly, on docker-compose pull it complains with ERROR: manifest for image-name:tag not found: manifest unknown: manifest unknown, since no upstream/registry image of that name exists. This is why I am now rolling this back to use copy-pasted/WET configs, see also here. – Alex Povel Jan 7 at 14:52
  • Its working fine for me. Thanks. – Vikram Ray Jan 15 at 5:23
9

This feature is called extension fields.

You can just link your slaves to your master.

django_project: 
  &django_project
  image: python:3.7.6-alpine
   command: ....  

django_project_task1:
  <<: *django_project
  command: /start-task1.sh 

django_project_task2:
  <<: *django_project
  command: /start-task2.sh 

Now the all share the same source but use different command to start.

Also, you have to understand one more thing.

Since Docker uses "layers" your Dockerfile is not going to be recompiled for every "sub-proccess" and volume size is going to be shrinked.

There is a perfect article on this topic

Also check out this article about running multiple process in one container.

Cool hack, huh?

2
  • 1
    Very interesting! Found that this is called YAML merge which I never heard of. The docker-compose usage is documented here. I would say this should be used with care and I'd use the YAML anchors instead (references are in the same link for docker-compose). – Ricardo Correa Mar 31 '20 at 11:31
  • This should be the preferred answer. Thanks for posting this! – alete May 4 at 13:44
4

If you'd use the following syntax in docker-compose.yaml the image will be built once by master, then used by slave:

version: '3'

services:
  master:
    build: docker/myservice
    image: master-image:3

  slave:
    image: master-image:3

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