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Disclaimer: The following is a purely academic question; I keep this code at least 100 m away from any production system. The problem posed here is something that cannot be measured in any “real life” case.

Consider the following code (godbolt link):

#include <stdlib.h>

typedef int (*func_t)(int *ptr); // functions must conform to this interface

extern int uses_the_ptr(int *ptr);
extern int doesnt_use_the_ptr(int *ptr);

int foo() {
    // actual selection is complex, there are multiple functions,
    // but I know `func` will point to a function that doesn't use the argument
    func_t func = doesnt_use_the_ptr;

    int *unused_ptr_arg = NULL; // I pay a zeroing (e.g. `xor reg reg`) in every compiler
    int *unused_ptr_arg; // UB, gcc zeroes (thanks for saving me from myself, gcc), clang doesn't
    int *unused_ptr_arg __attribute__((__unused__)); // Neither zeroing, nor UB, this is what I want

    return (*func)(unused_ptr_arg);
}

The compiler has no reasonable way to know that unused_ptr_arg is unneeded (and so the zeroing is wasted time), but I do, so I want to inform the compiler that unused_ptr_arg may have any value, such as whatever happens to be in the register that would be used for passing it to func.

Is there a way to do this? I know I’m way outside the standard, so I’ll be fine with compiler-specific extensions (especially for gcc & clang).

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  • Compiler specific ways/extension exist for a need. Now, I don't doubt the validity of this question, but what need is there to conserve a single xor reg reg? Apr 25, 2018 at 10:46
  • The _MAGIC_COMPILER_UNINITIALIZED_VALUE you need is the "standard" when you don't do any explicit initialization at all. If you want an uninitialized variable, then let it be uninitialized. Apr 25, 2018 at 10:48
  • 1
    @Someprogrammerdude , leaving it uninitialized is UB, the risk of nasal demons is always present, you never know a "smart" optimizer might remove the function call entirely, it's UB
    – 12345ieee
    Apr 25, 2018 at 10:48
  • 1
    @Someprogrammerdude - There's a fine point here. If the pointer value is indeterminate, even copying its value is UB (assuming I'm not getting C and C++ mixed up here). So passing it to the function is itself UB. Apr 25, 2018 at 10:50
  • 1
    Would overriding the type work for you? typedef int (*func0_t)(void); return (*(func0_t)func)(); for paths of code that know func == doesnt_use_the_ptr Apr 25, 2018 at 11:26

4 Answers 4

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Using GCC/Clang `asm` Construct

In GCC and Clang, and other compilers that support GCC’s extended assembly syntax, you can do this:

int *unused_ptr_arg;
__asm__("" : "=x" (unused_ptr_arg));

return (*func)(unused_ptr_arg);

That __asm__ construct says “Here is some assembly code to insert into the program at this point. It writes a result to unused_ptr_arg in whatever location you choose for it.” (The x constraint means the compiler may choose memory, a processor register, or anything else the machine supports.) But the actual assembly code is empty (""). So no assembly code is generated, but the compiler believes that unused_ptr_arg has been initialized. In Clang 6.0.0 and GCC 7.3 (latest versions currently at Compiler Explorer) for x86-64, this generates a jmp with no xor.

Using Standard C

Consider this:

int *unused_ptr_arg;
(void) &unused_ptr_arg;

return (*func)(unused_ptr_arg);

The purpose of (void) &unused_ptr_arg; is to take the address of unused_ptr_arg, even though the address is not used. This disables the rule in C 2011 [N1570] 6.3.2.1 2 that says behavior is undefined if a program uses the value of an uninitialized object of automatic storage duration that could have been declared with register. Because its address is taken, it could not have been declared with register, and therefore using the value is no longer undefined behavior according to this rule.

In consequence, the object has an indeterminate value. Then there is an issue of whether pointers may have a trap representation. If pointers do not have trap representations in the C implementation being used, then no trap will occur due to merely referring to the value, as when passing it as an argument.

The result with Clang 6.0.0 at Compiler Explorer is a jmp instruction with no setting of the parameter register, even if -Wall -Werror is added to the compiler options. In contrast, if the (void) line is removed, a compiler error results.

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  • 2
    @PeterJ_01: The behavior is not undefined. It is defined by GCC and Clang. You can deal with plaque at the dentist. Apr 25, 2018 at 16:07
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    @PeterJ_01: A premise of the question is that the function does not dereference the pointer. Apr 25, 2018 at 16:27
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    @PeterJ_01: As the question states, this is one particular case of a general situation in which all functions must conform to the type int (*func_t)(int *ptr). Thus func_t is used to hold various pointers at various times. Some of the functions do use the parameter, and so a valid value needs to be passed. Some of the functions do not use the parameter, and no particular value needs to be passed. For performance, OP wants to avoid the unnecessary initialization when it is known the parameter will not be used. Apr 25, 2018 at 16:52
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    @EricPostpischil there are the correct ways of archiving it without abusing the compiler. Same pointer and magically the calling function knows if it should initialize the variable. Hmm...... Any "academical" examples (of course with no (even a single instruction) code penalty)? Apr 25, 2018 at 17:31
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    @PeterJ_01 I'm not sure why you are still discussing about this and wasting Eric's time. I read all the comments and he interpreted my question 100% correctly, and then gave a great answer, which works even when used in the real code (no, I'll not leave it there, but I wanted to test it).
    – 12345ieee
    Apr 25, 2018 at 20:04
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int *unused_ptr_arg = NULL;

This is what you should be doing. You don't pay for anything. Zeroing an int is a no-op. Ok technically it's not, but practically it is. You will never ever ever see the time of this operation in your program. And I don't mean that it's so small that you won't notice it. I mean that it's so small that so many other factors and operations that are order of magnitude longer will "swallow" it.

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  • I absolutely agree that this is what I should do (and in fact it's what I do in real code), this question was specifically asking for a method to forego the zeroing.
    – 12345ieee
    Apr 25, 2018 at 10:56
  • @12345ieee yes, but your problem is misleading. Just by asking this you validate the ideea that zeroing is taxing, even in a small amount. What I am trying to say is that the problem you are trying to solve (even academically) doesn't exist.
    – bolov
    Apr 25, 2018 at 10:58
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    I'm sure I can design a contrived example to measure the zeroing (like a function with 6+8 unused parameters), but I agree that I'm creating a problem that doesn't really exist in real life. I updated the disclaimer at the top.
    – 12345ieee
    Apr 25, 2018 at 11:11
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    This answer disputes the premises of the question and does not answer it. While one might argue that the cost of zeroing is trivial, that is based on assumptions about the machines used and the purposes and circumstances of the software. I have worked on extremely high performance code where the cost of zeroing or even no-op instructions was a factor, so it is reasonable to ask questions where the cost of zeroing is significant. This answer is bad because it fails to answer the question as asked. Disputes about the premises of a question belong in comments, not answers. Apr 25, 2018 at 11:28
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    A nop instruction still isn't free. On x86, xor-zeroing a register costs a 2-byte instruction. It's the cheapest possible 2-byte instruction (on Sandybridge-family), but it still decodes to 1 uop that has to go through the pipeline, and takes space in the ROB until it retires. (Not in the out-of-order scheduler, though, on CPUs which eliminate it in the issue/rename stage. It enters the out-of-order part of the core in an already-executed state). Related: Can x86's MOV really be "free"? Why can't I reproduce this at all? nothing is free Apr 25, 2018 at 23:30
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This is not actually possible across all architectures for a very good reason.

A call to a function may need to spill its arguments to the stack, and in IA64, spilling uninitialized registers to the stack can crash because the previous contents of the register was a speculative load that loaded an address that wasn't mapped.

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    This was addressed, essentially, in my answer. The IA64 NaT bits motivated the rule in c 2011 6.3.2.1 2 that using an uninitialized object can cause undefined behavior. However, as written in the standard, that rule applies only to objects that could have been declared register. By taking its address (so it cannot be register), we compel the compiler not to allow undefined behavior due to that rule. So a compiler for IA64 would have to avoid causing a trap due to that IA64 feature. But, with the same source code, compilers for other implementations could avoid initializing the object. Apr 25, 2018 at 21:40
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    @EricPostpischil The value could still be a trap representation . We could say that any representation not corresponding to a mapped address is a trap representation
    – M.M
    Apr 25, 2018 at 23:57
  • @M.M: That is also addressed in my answer. Apr 26, 2018 at 0:22
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To prevent the possibility of zero-ing with each run of int foo(), simply make unused_ptr_arg static.

int foo() {
    func_t func = doesnt_use_the_ptr;
    static int *unused_ptr_arg;    
    return (*func)(unused_ptr_arg);
}
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    I've tested several compilers on godbolt, most keep the zeroing of the register, and some do a mov from static storage, which is even worse.
    – 12345ieee
    Apr 25, 2018 at 11:09
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    but it will zero it only on the startup which is a completely different case. Apr 25, 2018 at 11:11
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    @12345ieee "and some do a mov from static storage" --> I like to see this assembly code. Certainty the address of the static unused_ptr_arg is "moved". Apr 25, 2018 at 11:11
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    @PeterJ_01 declaring the function ptr as volatile only adds a ton of noise to the function call (as it should, the address has to be retrieved each time), but doesn't change at all the parameter zeroing strategy (you can check on godbolt). That's why I hardcoded it in.
    – 12345ieee
    Apr 25, 2018 at 11:31
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    I know what OP wants. But the question why to pass the undefined variable to the function? Apr 26, 2018 at 6:53

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