15

I'm looking into ConcurrentHashMap implementation and have a thing make me confused.

/* Specialized implementations of map methods */

        V get(Object key, int hash) {
            if (count != 0) { // read-volatile
                HashEntry<K,V> e = getFirst(hash);
                while (e != null) {
                    if (e.hash == hash && key.equals(e.key)) {
                        V v = e.value;
                        if (v != null)
                            return v;
                        return readValueUnderLock(e); // recheck
                    }
                    e = e.next;
                }
            }
            return null;
        }

and

    /**
     * Reads value field of an entry under lock. Called if value
     * field ever appears to be null. This is possible only if a
     * compiler happens to reorder a HashEntry initialization with
     * its table assignment, which is legal under memory model
     * but is not known to ever occur.
     */
    V readValueUnderLock(HashEntry<K,V> e) {
        lock();
        try {
            return e.value;
        } finally {
            unlock();
        }
    }

and HashEntry constructor

/**
     * ConcurrentHashMap list entry. Note that this is never exported
     * out as a user-visible Map.Entry.
     *
     * Because the value field is volatile, not final, it is legal wrt
     * the Java Memory Model for an unsynchronized reader to see null
     * instead of initial value when read via a data race.  Although a
     * reordering leading to this is not likely to ever actually
     * occur, the Segment.readValueUnderLock method is used as a
     * backup in case a null (pre-initialized) value is ever seen in
     * an unsynchronized access method.
     */
    static final class HashEntry<K,V> {
    final K key;
            final int hash;
            volatile V value;
            final HashEntry<K,V> next;

            HashEntry(K key, int hash, HashEntry<K,V> next, V value) {
                this.key = key;
                this.hash = hash;
                this.next = next;
                this.value = value;
            }

put implement

tab[index] = new HashEntry<K,V>(key, hash, first, value);

I confused at HashEntry comment, as JSR-133, once HashEntry is constructed, all final fields will be visible to all other threads, value field is volatile, so I think it visible to other threads too??? . Other point, is the reorder he said is: HashEntry object reference can be assigned to tab[...] before it is full constructed (so result is other threads can see this entry but e.value can be null) ?

Update: I read this article and it's good. But do I need to care about a case like this

ConcurrentLinkedQueue queue = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue();

thread1:

Person p=new Person("name","student");        
queue.offer(new Person());

thread2:
Person p = queue.poll();

Is there a chance that thread2 receive an unfinished-construct Person object just like HashEntry in

tab[index] = new HashEntry(key, hash, first, value); ?

2
  • 1
    With value volatile you can guarantee visibility by all other threads.
    – dimitrisli
    Feb 15 '11 at 10:27
  • yep, so all of fields are visible by all others threads, thus why we only need to care about value of 'value' to be null?
    – secmask
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:27
9

For those interested in an answer from the Doug Lea on this topic, he recently explained the reason for readValueUnderLock

This is in response to someone who had the question:

In the ConcurrentHashMap the get method does not require "readValueUnderLock" because a racing remove does not make the value null. The value never becomes null on the from the removing thread. this means it is possible for get to return a value for key even if the removing thread (on the same key) has progressed till the point of cloning the preceding parts of the list. This is fine so long as it is the desired effect.

But this means "readValueUnderLock" is not required for NEW memory model.

However for the OLD memory model a put may see the value null due to reordering(Rare but possible).

Is my understanding correct.

Response:

Not quite. You are right that it should never be called. However, the JLS/JMM can be read as not absolutely forbidding it from being called because of weaknesses in required ordering relationships among finals vs volatiles set in constructors (key is final, value is volatile), wrt the reads by threads using the entry objects. (In JMM-ese, ordering constraints for finals fall outside of the synchronizes-with relation.) That's the issue the doc comment (pasted below) refers to. No one has ever thought of any practical loophole that a processor/compiler might find to produce a null value read, and it may be provable that none exist (and perhaps someday a JLS/JMM revision will fill in gaps to clarify this), but Bill Pugh once suggested we put this in anyway just for the sake of being conservatively pedantically correct. In retrospect, I'm not so sure this was a good idea, since it leads people to come up with exotic theories.

It can all be viewed here

2
  • Thanks, John! Still no idea why the spec doesn't allow volatile fields to have semantics of finals during the c-tor calls. Both of them require a memory barrier to be implemented (so no special barrier for the volatiles during the c-tor calls, if the this doesn't escape).
    – bestsss
    Mar 1 '11 at 13:09
  • @bestsss I couldnt agree with you more. I cant imagine any good reason (and even Doug himself) for volatile initialization in a constructor be any different then finals.
    – John Vint
    Mar 1 '11 at 20:34
1

I confused at HashEntry comment, as JSR-133, once HashEntry is constructed, all final fields will be visible to all other threads, value field is volatile, so I think it visible to other threads too??? .

Other threads will see value as well but... The assigment of the entry (into the Object[]) is done after the initialization AND under lock. So if any thread sees null it will try to read the value under the lock.

Other point, is the reorder he said is: HashEntry object reference can be assigned to tab[...] before it is full constructed (so result is other threads can see this entry but e.value can be null) ?

No, it cannot b/c there is a volatile assignment (value) and than means all other operations must be set before hand (i.e. not reordered). Also keep in mind that java object creation is 2 phase, creating an empty object w/ zero/null fields (like using the default c-tor) and then calling <init> method (which is the constructor). The object cannot be assigned to anything before completing the constructor call and its last assignment of value (to ensure proper ordering also known as happens-before)

2
  • so, HashEntry is created and all the fields are set (volatile & final) by <init>, then object is assign to tab[..], I can not see any case make e.value to be null?
    – secmask
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:42
  • @secmask, I reply like that: I, myself, would have omitted the check, now it takes one extra cpu clock (since the branch is never taken and properly predicted by the cpu). Anyone can live w/ that.
    – bestsss
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:45
1

As far as I understand Memory Model, write to volatile variable is guaranteed to be visible by all subsequent (as defined by synchronization order) reads of that variable.

However, nothing guarantees that read of e.value in get() is subsequent to write of value in the constructor (since there are no synchronized-with relations between these actions), so that Memory Model allows this kind of reorder, and explicit synchronization in the case of null value is necessary to ensure that we read the correct value.

UPDATE: The new memory model guarantees that any write to non-volatile variable prior to write to the volatile variable can be seen by other threads after the subsequent read of that volatile variable, but not vice versa.

Here is the related excerpt from The Java Memory Model by Jeremy Manson, William Pugh and Sarita Adve:

5.1.1 Lock Coarsening.
...
All of this is simply a roundabout way of saying that accesses to normal variables can be reordered with a following volatile read or lock acquisition, or a preceding volatile write or lock release. This implies that normal accesses can be moved inside locking regions, but (for the most part) not out of them;

Therefore assignment of the constructed object can be reordered with the write to volatile variable inside a constructor, so that the check in question is required.

5
  • the entry, itself, should not be published in the Object[] before entry.value is set. The check is superfluous b/c any assignment before constructor's value one must complete (and can't be reordered). If they had to make it more explicit should have constructed the entry, set value and then set entry into the Object[] (although now it's practically compiled the same way)
    – bestsss
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:00
  • @bestsss: Can you prove your statement by some references to the memody model?
    – axtavt
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:04
  • @axtavt, I try The old memory model allowed for volatile writes to be reordered with nonvolatile reads and writes, which was not consistent with most developers intuitions about volatile and therefore caused confusion. [preface part];
    – bestsss
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:14
  • ... Writing to a volatile field has the same memory effect as a monitor release, and reading from a volatile field has the same memory effect as a monitor acquire. In effect, because the new memory model places stricter constraints on reordering of volatile field accesses with other field accesses, volatile or not, anything that was visible to thread A when it writes to volatile field f becomes visible to thread B when it reads f. x
    – bestsss
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:14
  • @axtavt, indeed, lock coarsing :) I don't think any implementation uses it with volatiles (no performance benefits at all) but it's a good example (and it's true for synchronized block)
    – bestsss
    Feb 21 '11 at 1:08

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