-3

In the below code,

function f([first, second]: [number, number]){
    console.log(first);
    console.log(second);
}

var input:number[] = [1,2];
f(input);

number[] type variable(input) is passed to f.

Why compiler errors out? Argument of type 'number[]' is not assignable to parameter of type '[number, number]'. Type 'number[]' is missing the following properties from type '[number, number]': 0, 1ts(2345)

15
  • 2
    What else would [1, 2] be, other than [number, number]?
    – Cerbrus
    Apr 25, 2018 at 14:48
  • @Cerbrus Can't it be number[]? We did this in C, Java... Apr 25, 2018 at 14:49
  • @Cerbrus A number[] array apparently
    – Bergi
    Apr 25, 2018 at 14:49
  • The question is "Why does this compile/typecheck?", not "How does this work?", right?
    – Bergi
    Apr 25, 2018 at 14:51
  • [number, number] (array of two members that are numbers) is more specific than number[] (array of x members that are numbers), that is why TypeScript will throw a compilation error. If you reverse the type declaration and use var input: [number, number] and f([first, second]: number[]) it will work.
    – Terry
    Apr 25, 2018 at 14:51

2 Answers 2

3

TypeScript can be very specific in what it expects to be passed to a method.

For your example:

function f([first, second]: [number, number]){
    console.log(first);
    console.log(second);
}

This will work:

var x: [number, number] = [1,2];

f([1,2]); // Type is implied:  [number, number]
f(x);     // Type is explicit: [number, number]

This won't:

var x = [1,2,3];
var y = [1,2];
var z: number[] = [1,2];

f(x); // Type is implied:  number[]
f(y); // Type is implied:  number[]
f(z); // Type is explicit: number[]

You told typescript to expect an array containing 2 numbers. That's why it won't accept anything but an array containing 2 numbers.

You can change the accepted type like this:

function f([first, second]: number[]){
// Keep destructuring ^,      ^ but change the accepted type.
    console.log(first);  
    console.log(second);
}

Then, any of the previous 6 examples will work, as [number, <number...>] are also number[] arrays.

4
  • Your answer looks incorrect to me. For let inp = [1, 2]; compiler's type inference says inp as number[] Apr 25, 2018 at 15:18
  • 3
    @overexchange: You just completely broke my answer. You're making a lot of incorrect assumptions about how TypeScript works.
    – Cerbrus
    Apr 25, 2018 at 15:42
  • f(x) will not work, where var x = [1,2] because x is inferred as number[] type Apr 25, 2018 at 16:08
  • I missed that one.
    – Cerbrus
    Apr 25, 2018 at 16:18
0

It's not about arrays but simple type checking. It gives you an error, because type number[] is not same as [number, number].

You can change input type to [number, number] as follows

var input: [number, number] = [1, 2]

or keep the input as is and do following

f(input as [number, number])

Edit

f([1,2]) works just fine because you are explicitly passing two numbers.

1

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