200

like when I do

SELECT [Date]
  FROM [FRIIB].[dbo].[ArchiveAnalog]
  GROUP BY [Date]

how can I specify the group period ?

MS SQL 2008

2nd Edit

I'm trying

SELECT MIN([Date]) AS RecT, AVG(Value)
  FROM [FRIIB].[dbo].[ArchiveAnalog]
  GROUP BY (DATEPART(MINUTE, [Date]) / 10)
  ORDER BY RecT

changed %10 to / 10. is it possible to make Date output without milliseconds ?

0

15 Answers 15

245

finally done with

GROUP BY
DATEPART(YEAR, DT.[Date]),
DATEPART(MONTH, DT.[Date]),
DATEPART(DAY, DT.[Date]),
DATEPART(HOUR, DT.[Date]),
(DATEPART(MINUTE, DT.[Date]) / 10)
4
  • 13
    I made it ROUND((DATEPART(MINUTE, DT.[Date]) / 5),0,1) * 5, so that when I look at the data it's correlated with the nearest time slot
    – hdost
    Aug 3 '15 at 15:46
  • 7
    Year, month and day can be simplified to DATE(DT.[Date]).
    – user1544337
    Oct 2 '16 at 7:46
  • @Keelan Doesn't work for me - however CONVERT(date, DT.[Date]) does. Feb 6 '18 at 15:16
  • datepart(hour, workingPolicy.workingHours)/2.0 gives 1.5 while datepart(hour, '1900-01-01 09:00:30.000')/2.0 gives 4.5 , i don't understand why? Note:workingPolicy.workingHours=1900-01-01 09:00:30.000. please help
    – affanBajwa
    Dec 29 '18 at 7:58
89

Short and sweet

I'm super late to the party, but this doesn't appear in any of the existing answers:

GROUP BY DATEADD(MINUTE, DATEDIFF(MINUTE, '2000', date_column) / 10 * 10, '2000')

Practical usage

SELECT   DATEADD(MINUTE, DATEDIFF(MINUTE, '2000', aa.[date]) / 10 * 10, '2000')
                                                             AS [date_truncated],
         COUNT(*) AS [records_in_interval],
         AVG(aa.[value]) AS [average_value]
FROM     [friib].[dbo].[archive_analog] AS aa
-- WHERE aa.[date] > '1900-01-01'
GROUP BY DATEADD(MINUTE, DATEDIFF(MINUTE, '2000', aa.[date]) / 10 * 10, '2000')
ORDER BY [date_truncated]

Details and commentary

  • The MINUTE and 10 terms can be changed to any DATEPART and integer,1 respectively, to group into different time intervals.

    • e.g. 10 with MINUTE is ten minute intervals; 6 with HOUR is six hour intervals.

    • If you change the interval a lot, you might benefit from DECLAREing it as a variable.

      DECLARE @interval int = 10;
      …
      GROUP BY DATEADD(MINUTE, … / @interval * @interval, '2000')
      
  • It is a DATETIME value, which means:

    • Long time intervals are fine. Some other answers have collision between years.
    • Including it in the SELECT statement will give your output a column that has pretty output truncated at the level you specify.
  • The truncating integer division (a FLOOR shortcut) makes the date output shown in a SELECT the beginning of each time interval. If you want the middle or end of the interval, you can tweak the division in the second term of DATEADD with the bold part below:

    • End of interval: …) / 10 * 10 + 10 , '2000'), credit to Daniel Elkington.
    • Middle of interval: …) / 10 * 10 + (10 / 2.0) , '2000').

Trivia

'2000' is an "anchor date" around which SQL will perform the date math. Most sample code uses 0 for the anchor, but JereonH discovered that you encounter an integer overflow when grouping more-recent dates by seconds or milliseconds.2

If your data spans centuries,3 using a single anchor date in the GROUP BY for seconds or milliseconds will still encounter the overflow. For those queries, you can ask each row to anchor the binning comparison to its own date's midnight:

  • Use DATEADD(DAY, DATEDIFF(DAY, 0, aa.[date]), 0) instead of '2000' wherever it appears above. Your query will be totally unreadable, but it will work.

  • An alternative might be CONVERT(DATETIME, CONVERT(DATE, aa.[date])) as the replacement.

1 Technically, you can use any integer that the maximum for that DATEPART can divide into.4 If you want to group your results into 13-minute bins or 37-hour ones, you may end up with unequally-filled bins or time-shifted results.
2 The math says 232 ≈ 4.29E+9. This means for a DATEPART of SECOND, you get 4.3 billion seconds on either side, which works out to "anchor date ± 136 years." Similarly, 232 milliseconds is ≈ 49.7 days.
3 If your data actually spans centuries or millenia and is still accurate to the second or millisecond… congratulations! Whatever you're doing, keep doing it.
4 If you ever wondered why our clocks have a 12 at the top, reflect on how 5 is the only integer from 6 (half of 12) or below that is not a factor of 12. Then note that 5 × 12 = 60. You have lots of choices for bin sizes with hours, minutes, and seconds.

5
  • To round UP to the nearest 10 minutes you can do GROUP BY DATEADD(MINUTE, (DATEDIFF(MINUTE, 0, date_column) / 10 * 10) + 10, 0) (and the same in the SELECT clause). Dec 17 '18 at 22:54
  • 2
    for SECOND as DATEPART I get an error message (The datediff function resulted in an overflow. The number of dateparts separating two date/time instances is too large. Try to use datediff with a less precise datepart.). It seems that MINUTE is the smallest datepart you can use with this approach.
    – jeroenh
    Aug 1 '19 at 14:51
  • 1
    @jeroenh, you are correct. I have added a section to talk about that. tldr: Change the 0 to '2000' (quotes are important!) and try SECOND again.
    – Michael
    Sep 4 '19 at 13:44
  • @Michael This technique works great, but I did notice that if a given slice has a zero count, there is no corresponding row in the result set.
    – howcheng
    Oct 2 '19 at 22:49
  • @howcheng Indeed. To do that, you could right-join against a table of all the possible intervals. You can generate one with a cursor, but I feel that's out of scope for the question.
    – Michael
    Oct 3 '19 at 13:35
20

In T-SQL you can:

SELECT [Date]
  FROM [FRIIB].[dbo].[ArchiveAnalog]
  GROUP BY [Date], DATEPART(hh, [Date])

or

by minute use DATEPART(mi, [Date])

or

by 10 minutes use DATEPART(mi, [Date]) / 10 (like Timothy suggested)

6
  • 1
    GROUP BY [Date], DATEPART(hh, [Date]) is a mess , not ?
    – cnd
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:07
  • 1
    @nCdy Should be all right, otherwise you get an error "...invalid in the select list because it is not contained in either an aggregate function or the GROUP BY clause"
    – tzup
    Feb 15 '11 at 11:23
  • 1
    How do you group by whole date and by hours in the same time? I'm just using Min Date .
    – cnd
    Feb 15 '11 at 12:18
  • if you use Min(Date) then of course you can take out the Date in the Group By.
    – tzup
    Feb 15 '11 at 12:22
  • 3
    Minutes divided by 10 will create grouping by 10 minute intervals, which i what's needed. Modulo 10 makes no sense.
    – Tar
    Dec 2 '13 at 15:15
13

For a 10 minute interval, you would

GROUP BY (DATEPART(MINUTE, [Date]) / 10)

As was already mentioned by tzup and Pieter888... to do an hour interval, just

GROUP BY DATEPART(HOUR, [Date])
4
  • 3
    but here I group minutes of 1980 year with minutes of 2011 :S I need to care about it.
    – cnd
    Feb 22 '11 at 12:50
  • Would % be the correct math? Wouldn't that create 10 groups. For example: 1 % 10 = 9 2 % 10 = 8 It wouldn't even necessarily be the correct chronological grouping either. I think just a normal divide would be correct. Unless % isn't a remainder divide in sql.
    – Steven
    Sep 18 '13 at 23:30
  • 12
    Minutes divided by 10 will create grouping by 10 minute intervals, which i what's needed. Modulo 10 makes no sense.
    – Tar
    Dec 2 '13 at 15:15
  • Agreed with Tar. The grouping does not make sense.
    – MikeMurko
    Oct 7 '16 at 0:41
8

Should be something like

select timeslot, count(*)  
from 
    (
    select datepart('hh', date) timeslot
    FROM [FRIIB].[dbo].[ArchiveAnalog]  
    ) 
group by timeslot

(Not 100% sure about the syntax - I'm more an Oracle kind of guy)

In Oracle:

SELECT timeslot, COUNT(*) 
FROM
(  
    SELECT to_char(l_time, 'YYYY-MM-DD hh24') timeslot 
    FROM
    (
        SELECT l_time FROM mytab  
    )  
) GROUP BY timeslot 
7

The original answer the author gave works pretty well. Just to extend this idea, you can do something like

group by datediff(minute, 0, [Date])/10

which will allow you to group by a longer period then 60 minutes, say 720, which is half a day etc.

2
  • 1
    What would be the MySQL query for the above ?
    – Biranchi
    Sep 12 '16 at 21:48
  • this one is definitely better than the accepted answer. one can also set an arbitrary date instead of 0, and make the resulting datediff smaller: DATEDIFF(minute, CAST('2021-08-01' AS datetime), [Date])/10
    – Chingiz K.
    Aug 12 at 20:30
5

For MySql:

GROUP BY
DATE(`your_date_field`),
HOUR(`your_date_field`),
FLOOR( MINUTE(`your_date_field`) / 10);
1
  • It's help to me
    – insung
    May 21 at 8:12
3
declare @interval tinyint
set @interval = 30
select dateadd(minute,(datediff(minute,0,[DateInsert])/@interval)*@interval,0), sum(Value_Transaction)
from Transactions
group by dateadd(minute,(datediff(minute,0,[DateInsert])/@interval)*@interval,0)
2
  • 8
    Welcome to stackoverflow. You need to fully explain your answer, and what this adds to the other 10 answers already on the site.
    – Simon.S.A.
    Mar 3 '19 at 19:53
  • This helped me figure out why the query failed, when using variables. Oct 15 '20 at 11:34
1

My solution is to use a function to create a table with the date intervals and then join this table to the data I want to group using the date interval in the table. The date interval can then be easily selected when presenting the data.

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[fn_MinuteIntervals]
    (
      @startDate SMALLDATETIME ,
      @endDate SMALLDATETIME ,
      @interval INT = 1
    )
RETURNS @returnDates TABLE
    (
      [date] SMALLDATETIME PRIMARY KEY NOT NULL
    )
AS
    BEGIN
        DECLARE @counter SMALLDATETIME
        SET @counter = @startDate
        WHILE @counter <= @endDate
            BEGIN
                INSERT INTO @returnDates VALUES ( @counter )
                SET @counter = DATEADD(n, @interval, @counter)
            END
        RETURN
    END
1
  • Using a cursor will be very very slow on large data sets.
    – Nicow
    Mar 22 at 8:40
1

For SQL Server 2012, though I believe it would work in SQL Server 2008R2, I use the following approach to get time slicing down to the millisecond:

DATEADD(MILLISECOND, -DATEDIFF(MILLISECOND, CAST(time AS DATE), time) % @msPerSlice, time)

This works by:

  • Getting the number of milliseconds between a fixed point and target time:
    @ms = DATEDIFF(MILLISECOND, CAST(time AS DATE), time)
  • Taking the remainder of dividing those milliseconds into time slices:
    @rms = @ms % @msPerSlice
  • Adding the negative of that remainder to the target time to get the slice time:
    DATEADD(MILLISECOND, -@rms, time)

Unfortunately, as is this overflows with microseconds and smaller units, so larger, finer data sets would need to use a less convenient fixed point.

I have not rigorously benchmarked this and I am not in big data, so your mileage may vary, but performance was not noticeably worse than the other methods tried on our equipment and data sets, and the payout in developer convenience for arbitrary slicing makes it worthwhile for us.

1
  • This is very cute, and it builds in resistance to the SECOND and MILLISECOND overflows I needed to address later in my answer. You deserve more recognition than you've had.
    – Michael
    Nov 5 '20 at 15:19
1
select dateadd(minute, datediff(minute, 0, Date), 0),
       sum(SnapShotValue)
FROM [FRIIB].[dbo].[ArchiveAnalog]
group by dateadd(minute, datediff(minute, 0, Date), 0)
1
  • 1
    Please provide some explanations when you answer a question.
    – Shizzen83
    Jun 22 '20 at 18:43
0
select from_unixtime( 600 * ( unix_timestamp( [Date] ) % 600 ) ) AS RecT, avg(Value)
from [FRIIB].[dbo].[ArchiveAnalog]
group by RecT
order by RecT;

replace the two 600 by any number of seconds you want to group.

If you need this often and the table doesn't change, as the name Archive suggests, it would probably be a bit faster to convert and store the date (& time) as a unixtime in the table.

0

I know I am late to the show with this one, but I used this - pretty simple approach. This allows you to get the 60 minute slices without any rounding issues.

Select 
   CONCAT( 
            Format(endtime,'yyyy-MM-dd_HH:'),  
            LEFT(Format(endtime,'mm'),1),
            '0' 
          ) as [Time-Slice]
0

If you want to actually display the date, and want to have a variable grouping, and want to be able to specify larger time frames as 60 minutes:

DECLARE @minutes int
SET @minutes = 90

SELECT
    DATEADD(MINUTE, DATEDIFF(MINUTE, 0, [Date]) / @minutes * @minutes, 0) as [Date],
    AVG([Value]) as [Value]
FROM [FRIIB].[dbo].[ArchiveAnalog]
GROUP BY
    DATEDIFF(MINUTE, 0, [Date]) / @minutes
-1

Try this query. It makes one column. (references @nobilist answer)

GROUP BY CAST(DATE(`your_date_field`) as varchar) || ' ' || CAST(HOUR(`your_date_field`) as varchar) || ':' || CAST(FLOOR(minute(`your_date_field`) / 10) AS varchar) || '0' AS date_format

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