5

I have an odd behavior about running processes from F#. My basic problem was to run Graphviz's dot.exe with a generated graph, and visualize it.

When I restricted the graph to be small, everything worked fine. But with bigger graphs, it hanged on a specific line. I'm curious why is it happening, so maybe I can fix my issue. Tho I created an MVCE for the purpose.

I have 2 console programs. One is the simulator of dot.exe, where I would showel the input, and expect .jpg from. This version just streams 10 times the input to the output in blocks:

// Learn more about F# at http://fsharp.org
// See the 'F# Tutorial' project for more help.
open System
open System.IO

[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv = 
    let bufferSize = 4096
    let mutable buffer : char [] = Array.zeroCreate bufferSize
    // it repeats in 4096 blocks, but it doesn't matter. It's a simulation of outputing 10 times amount output.
    while Console.In.ReadBlock(buffer, 0, bufferSize) <> 0 do
        for i in 1 .. 10 do
            Console.Out.WriteLine(buffer)
    0 // return an integer exit code

So I have an .exe named C:\Users\MyUserName\Documents\Visual Studio 2015\Projects\ProcessInputOutputMVCE\EchoExe\bin\Debug\EchoExe.exe Than comes another console project, which uses it:

// Learn more about F# at http://fsharp.org
// See the 'F# Tutorial' project for more help.
open System.IO

[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv = 
    let si = 
        new System.Diagnostics.ProcessStartInfo(@"C:\Users\MyUserName\Documents\Visual Studio 2015\Projects\ProcessInputOutputMVCE\EchoExe\bin\Debug\EchoExe.exe", "",
// from Fake's Process handling
#if FX_WINDOWSTLE
            WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden,
#else
            CreateNoWindow = true,
#endif
            UseShellExecute = false,
            RedirectStandardOutput = true,
            RedirectStandardError = true,
            RedirectStandardInput = true)
    use p = new System.Diagnostics.Process()
    p.StartInfo <- si
    if p.Start() then 
        let input =
            Seq.replicate 3000 "aaaa"
            |> String.concat "\n"
        p.StandardInput.Write input
        // hangs on Flush()
        p.StandardInput.Flush()
        p.StandardInput.Close()
        use outTxt = File.Create "out.txt"
        p.StandardOutput.BaseStream.CopyTo outTxt
        // double WaitForExit because of https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.process.standardoutput(v=vs.110).aspx
        // saying first WaitForExit() waits for StandardOutput. Next is needed for the whole process.
        p.WaitForExit()
        p.WaitForExit()
    0 // return an integer exit code

Which hangs on p.StandardInput.Flush(). Except if I change the volume of input to Seq.replicate 300 "aaaa". Why is it working differently?

Process.StandardOutput's reference states that reading from StandardOutput and child process writing to that stream in the same time might cause deadlock. Who is a child process in that case? Is it my p.StandardInput.Write input?

Other possible deadlock would be

read all text from both the standard output and standard error streams.

But I'm not reading the error stream. Anyway it suggests to handle the input/output with async so I have a following version:

    // same as before
    ...
    if p.Start() then 
        let rec writeIndefinitely (rows: string list) = 
            async {
                if rows.Length = 0 then
                    ()
                else
                    do! Async.AwaitTask (p.StandardInput.WriteLineAsync rows.Head)
                    p.StandardInput.Flush()
                    do! writeIndefinitely rows.Tail
                }

        let inputTaskContinuation =
            Seq.replicate 3000 "aaaa"
            |> Seq.toList
            |> writeIndefinitely
        Async.Start (async {
                        do! inputTaskContinuation
                        p.StandardInput.Close()
                        }
                     )   
        let bufferSize = 4096
        let mutable buffer : char array = Array.zeroCreate bufferSize
        use outTxt = File.CreateText "out.txt"
        let rec readIndefinitely() = 
            async {
                let! readBytes = Async.AwaitTask (p.StandardOutput.ReadAsync (buffer, 0, bufferSize))
                if readBytes <> 0 then
                    outTxt.Write (buffer, 0, buffer.Length)
                    outTxt.Flush()
                    do! readIndefinitely()
            }
        Async.Start (async { 
                        do! readIndefinitely()
                        p.StandardOutput.Close()
                        })
        // with that it throws "Cannot mix synchronous and asynchronous operation on process stream." on let! readBytes = Async.AwaitTask (p.StandardOutput.ReadAsync (buffer, 0, bufferSize))
        //p.BeginOutputReadLine()
        p.WaitForExit()
        // using dot.exe, it hangs on the second WaitForExit()
        p.WaitForExit()

Which doesn't hang, and writes out.txt. Except in the real code using dot.exe. It's as async as it gets. Why does it throw exception for p.BeginOutputReadLine()?

After some experimenting, the whole async out can stay p.StandardOutput.BaseStream.CopyTo outTxt where outTxt is File.Create not File.CreateText. Only the async input behaves correct against the synchronous input handling. Which is weird.

To sum it up. If I have asynchronous input handling, it works fine (except dot.exe, but if I figure it out, maybe I can fix that too), if it have synchronous input handling, it's depending on the size of the input. (300 works, 3000 doesn't) Why is that?

Update

Since I really not needed to redirect the standard error, I have removed RedirectStandardError = true. That solved the mysterious dot.exe problem.

1 Answer 1

6

I think that the deadlock here is following:

  1. Host process writes too much data to the input buffer.
  2. Child process reads from the buffer and writes to output.
  3. Host process does not read from the buffer (it happens after sending all the data). When the output buffer of the child process is filled up, it blocks on writing and stops reading from the input. Two processes are now in the deadlock state.

It is not necessary to use completely asynchronous code. What I think would work is writing in chunks to dot's stdin and reading to the end of the dot's stdout before writing again.

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  • How would that look like? How to figure out the chunk size?
    – ntohl
    Commented Apr 26, 2018 at 8:53
  • It seems to me, that at the dot.exe case it doesn't support chunking. It needs the whole data before able to make the jpg of the graph. In that case, how does the cmd.exe do it?
    – ntohl
    Commented Apr 26, 2018 at 8:55
  • When the application need all data from the input stream it can read it into the application buffer and then start processing it and output result to stdout. Application "buffer" can be any structure in the heap and is concern of the developer. Stream buffer is an array of specific size in the internals of the Stream class. Commented Apr 26, 2018 at 11:24
  • I don't really get it. When I fill up the dot.exe's input stream, I suspect it would start processing the input, but doesn't output anything, because need all the data for generating output. I write too much data to the input buffer, as You stated. But Child doesn't write to output yet.
    – ntohl
    Commented Apr 26, 2018 at 11:48
  • 1
    Well, then dot behaves differently from the simulator of dot.exe. The simulator reads chunk and then writes it 10 times, most likely quickly filling up the buffer. The real dot.exe may fail on something else and stop reading from the buffer so the Flush never completes. Perhaps by sending data of various sizes you can find whether it stops consistently in one place and get in touch with dot.exe developers about this issue. Also make sure that you read from stderr as well. Commented Apr 26, 2018 at 12:10

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