6

Say I have some code like this

function Chart(start, end, controller, method, chart)
{
    console.log('Chart constructor called');
    this.start = start;
    this.end = end;
    this.controller = controller;
    this.method = method;
    this.chart = chart;
    this.options = {};
}

Chart.prototype.update = function()
{
    console.log('update ' + new Date().getTime());
    $.getJSON('index.php', {
        controller: this.controller,
        method: this.method,
        START: this.start,
        END: this.end },
        function(json) { this.draw(json); }); //<-- Problem right here!
}              

Chart.prototype.draw = function(json)
{
    //lots of code here
}

I'm getting the error Uncaught TypeError: Object #<an Object> has no method 'draw'. Now, I'm the first to admit that I'm pretty new to Javascript. Am I supposed to call member functions in another way? Or am I supposed to do something different altogether?

edit: Here is how I'm creating my object:

chartObj = new Chart(start, end, 'OBF.RootCauses', 'ajaxRootCauses', chart);

5
  • How are you invoking the method. Are you accidentally doing var x = Chart() instead of var x = new Chart().
    – erikkallen
    Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:26
  • i am not very into JS at the time, but try to instnciate draw befor update ... maybe that'll do the trick
    – helle
    Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:29
  • Welcome to the JavaScript this hell...as someone said this when you call draw refers to the context of the callback not your object
    – Luis
    Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:31
  • I've added how I'm creating the object. And helle, thanks, but I've tried changing the order of my function creation... no dice.
    – 2-bits
    Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:31
  • This helped me: stackoverflow.com/a/4947449/470749
    – Ryan
    Commented Sep 19, 2014 at 5:52

2 Answers 2

6

The problem here is that this is changed because you are defining a new function - so this refers to the function you are in.

There are other ways how to get around this, but the simplest way would be to save this to a variable and call the function on that variable, something like this:

Chart.prototype.update = function()
{
    console.log('update ' + new Date().getTime());
    var self = this;
    $.getJSON('index.php', {
        controller: this.controller,
        method: this.method,
        START: this.start,
        END: this.end },
        function(json) { self.draw(json); });
} 

See Chris's answer for a different approach for solving the same problem.

4
  • 3
    And to put some code to the words, try: console.log('update ' + new Date().getTime()); var self = this; $.getJSON('index.php', ..., function(json) { self.draw(json); }); :) Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:29
  • Yeah I'll add it to the answer. Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:31
  • That did it! A little puzzling to me... I'm not sure I see why this would suddenly work just because I assigned it to another variable. At any rate, it's working, and my charts have popped to life.
    – 2-bits
    Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:41
  • 1
    @2bits: Because this is a special variable that is set to the context a function is invoked in. By assigning the value of this to another variable you can refer to that value in another scope. An other of these "special variables" is arguments. Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:44
3

Since you're already using jQuery, you can change this line

function( json ) { this.draw( json ); });

to this:

$.proxy( this.draw, this ) );

That will preserve the context where the function was called (i.e., the this variable).

1
  • That's really interesting. I'd have given it to you but Jakub answered first and it was for a more general case. You still get my upvote, though =)
    – 2-bits
    Commented Feb 15, 2011 at 14:45

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