1

Hey I've been trying to write a simple javascript function for comparing string letters but i can't make it work for some reason...here is the code.

function compare(wordOne, wordTwo) {
    if (wordOne.substring(0) === wordTwo.substring(0))
    {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}
compare("house", "hell");
| |
  • String letters -> What exactly are you trying to do? – Nikhil Aggarwal Apr 27 '18 at 12:30
  • What is your code trying to achieve? You want to compare only first chaaracter? – gurvinder372 Apr 27 '18 at 12:30
  • developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… with .substring() you have the option to include where the substring starts and ends (if end is omitted, it will capture to the end of the string)... wordOne.substring(0,1) – Doug Apr 27 '18 at 12:33
  • Yes sorry i didn't explain it really nice...but yes i only need to compare first character. – nitring Apr 27 '18 at 12:34
  • You can also treat strings as arrays of characters. str = "hello" means that str[1] = e – TheCrzyMan Apr 27 '18 at 12:35
3

Assuming you want to compare the first letter of the two strings, you can use the following code

function compare(wordOne, wordTwo) {
    return wordOne[0] === wordTwo[0];
}
compare("house", "hell");

This condenses the if/else condition, as you are just interested in whether the first letters are equal - not in how different they are. You can also use str.toUpperCase() (or) str.toLowerCase() in order to make the comparison case insensitive.

As per @Josh Katofsky's suggestion, you can of course make this function more versatile by - for instance - adding a third parameter that tests the n-th letter:

function compare(wordOne, wordTwo, index) {
    return wordOne[index] === wordTwo[index];
}
compare("house", "hell", 0);
| |
  • 2
    It would help make the code more reusable if you passed an index into the function and then returned wordOne[index] === wordTwo[index] – Josh Katofsky Apr 27 '18 at 12:33
3

To explain why your current code doesn't work, you need to pass a second parameter to .substring as the to value. String.substring(0) just returns the whole string after the 0th character, so the entire word. Fixed example;

function compare(wordOne, wordTwo) {
    if (wordOne.substring(0, 1) === wordTwo.substring(0, 1)) {
        return true;
    }
    else 
    {
        return false;
    }
}

compare("house", "hell");

You could also just use wordOne[0] === wordTwo[0]

| |
1

substring returns the part of the string between the start and end indexes, or to the end of the string.

If you want to compare only first character, use charAt

function compare(wordOne, wordTwo) {
   return wordOne.charAt(0) === wordTwo.charAt(0);
}
compare("house", "hell");

Or you can pass the index as the parameter

function compare(wordOne, wordTwo, index) {
   return wordOne.charAt(index) === wordTwo.charAt(index);
}
compare("house", "hell", 0);
| |
  • 1
    you have luck that javascript is nice for the developer so that your second example would work as intended :P (add extra arg for clarity) – KarelG Apr 27 '18 at 12:35

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.