4

I have a rest controller that includes a method to look for books depending on "title" and "author" params.

Could you give me any hint how to get rid of the if-else construction? Now it's not complicated but in future the number of parameters can increase that will lead to a mess.

    @GetMapping
    public ResponseEntity<List<Book>> searchBooksByTitleAndAuthor(
            @RequestParam(value = "title", required = false) String title,
            @RequestParam(value = "author", required = false) String author) {

        if (title == null && author == null) {
            log.info("Empty request");
            return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
        } else if (title != null && author == null) {
            log.info("Retrieving books by title");
            List<Book> books = bookService.getBooksByTitle(title);
            if (books.isEmpty()) {
                log.info("No books with this title");
                return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
            }
            return new ResponseEntity<>(books, HttpStatus.OK);
        } else if (author != null && title == null) {
            List<Book> books = bookService.getBooksByTitle(title);
            if (books.isEmpty()) {
                log.info("No books with this title");
                return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
            }
            return new ResponseEntity<>(books, HttpStatus.OK);
        } else {
            List<Book> books = bookService.getBooksByTitleAndAuthor(title, author);
            if (books.isEmpty()) {
                log.info("No books with matching this title and author");
                return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
            }
            return new ResponseEntity<>(books, HttpStatus.OK);
        }

    }
7
  • You can't always avoid it directly, it may require thinking further back that just the if...else section. in your case presented here, you could try nested if...elses, but that's only a slight gain in clarity of code. – AntonH Apr 27 '18 at 14:31
  • Use Optional may be, helps in handling the null checks there by reducing your if-else blocks! – N00b Pr0grammer Apr 27 '18 at 14:31
  • I would recommend a HashMap approach where you key will be a Object that holds all parameters and you have all possibilities inserted in the map. While the Value of the Map will be a Interface object that executes the object above you want for each key. – Marcos Vasconcelos Apr 27 '18 at 14:32
  • 2
    This is probably poor API design. In case you are not bound to use this contract you should consider alternating it. Why not have 3 endpoints? 1 get books by title, the other get books by author and the last get books by author and title. Moreover what does the first block of code exactly? – Varvarigos Emmanouil Apr 27 '18 at 14:33
  • If I do it I will face ambiguous mapping books?title= and books?author. stackoverflow.com/questions/50062371/… I was adviced to use one search method – Pasha Apr 27 '18 at 14:36
2

Since your plan is to eventually support more parameters, your best bet would probably be to look into Hibernate's Criteria class. This allows you to dynamically construct queries. It won't avoid the if statements, but it will avoid the else statements and make it pretty easy to support new parameters. At your repository/DAO level:

Criteria criteria = session.createCriteria(Book.class);
if (author != null && !author.isEmpty()) {
    criteria.add(Restriction.eq("author", author));
}
if (title != null && !title.isEmpty()) {
    criteria.add(Restriction.eq("title", title));
}
criteria.addOrder(Order.asc("publishDate"));
return (List<Book>) criteria.list();

This has some notable benefits:

  1. To support a new parameter, you just need to add your parameter to your controller, then pass the parameter down to your repository, and add the parameter to this block.

  2. You can eventually make your sort configurable, e.g.:

    ?sort=title:asc&author=Bobby%20Tables

However, there are some disadvantages, the most obvious being that it depends on string values to refer to your properties. If your property name changes (note this is the POJO property, not the DB column name), then this code will need to change. However, I'd argue that this a very rare situation except in the newest of new projects where the database schemata are still in flux, and after the database schemata are established, this disadvantage will rarely cause issues.

Another tip, once you hit a certain number of parameters being passed in (e.g. 4-5) create a parameter object to wrap your parameters up into a single, nice object that can be passed around.

1

I would recommend Specification or Querydsl.
It is inspired from the domain driven design/model and the implementation relies on the JPA Criteria that allows flexibility in query building.

Here is an example (not tested but you should get the general idea).

BookSpecifications

A factory class to create dynamically specifications.

public class BookSpecifications {

    private BookSpecifications(){
    }

    public static Specification<Book> withAuthor(String author) {
        return new Specification<Book>() {
            public Predicate toPredicate(Root<Book> root, CriteriaQuery<?> query, CriteriaBuilder cb) {
                return cb.equal(root.get("author"), author);
            }
        };
    }

    public static Specification<Book> withTitle(String title) {
        return new Specification<Book>() {
            public Predicate toPredicate(Root<Book> root, CriteriaQuery<?> query, CriteriaBuilder cb) {
                return cb.equal(root.get("title"), title);
            }
        };
    }
}

Note that using constant values that were generated at compile time from the Entity classes is a nicer approach. Yo could refer the attributes of the entity with Book.author or Book.title instead of using some Strings not checked at compile time against the actual Entity model such as "author" or "title".

BookController

In the controller side, you should avoid reduce at its minimal the logic and favor the delegation of the processing to the service class that will create the required specification and pass it to the repository.

public class BookController {
    @GetMapping
    public ResponseEntity<List<Book>> searchBooksByTitleAndAuthor(
            @RequestParam(value = "title", required = false) String title,
            @RequestParam(value = "author", required = false) String author) {


        List<Book> books = bookService.findAll(title, author);

        if (books.isEmpty()) {
            log.info("No books with this specification ");
            return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
        }
        return new ResponseEntity<>(books, HttpStatus.OK);

    }
}

BookService

The whole logic is here (the unit tests should be focused here).

public class BookService {

    private BookRepository bookRepository;

    public BookService(BookRepository bookRepository){
         this.bookRepository = bookRepository;
    }

    public List<Book> findAll(String title, String author) {

       if (Stream.of(title, author)
                 .filter(s-> s == null || s.equals(""))
                 .count() == 0) {
            return new ArrayList<>();
        }

        Specification<Book> specification = createSpecification(specification, title, () -> BookSpecifications.withTitle(title));
        specification = createSpecification(specification, author, () -> BookSpecifications.withAuthor(author));
        List<Book> books = bookRepository.findAll(specification);
        return books;

    }

    Specification<Book> createSpecification(Specification<Book> currentSpecification, String arg, Callable<Specification<Book>> callable) {

        // no valued parameter so we return
        if (arg == null) {
            return currentSpecification;
        }

        try {

           // Specification instance already created : reuse it
            if (currentSpecification != null) { 
                return currentSpecification.and(callable.call());
            }

           // Specification instance not created yes : create a new one
            return callable.call();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // handle the exception... if any
        }

    }
}

Adding a new entity attribute in the search is very simple.
Add the parameter in the method and in the stream that tests if at least a criteria search is filled and then chain a new call to createSpecification() :

// existing
Specification<Book> specification = createSpecification(specification, title, () -> BookSpecifications.withTitle(title));
specification = createSpecification(specification, author, () -> BookSpecifications.withAuthor(author));
// change below !
specification = createSpecification(specification, anotherColumn, () -> BookSpecifications.withAnotherColumn(anotherColumn));

BookRepository

Last step : make your BookRepository interface extends JpaSpecificationExecutor to be able invoke Repository methods accepting Specification<T> parameters such as :

List<T> findAll(@Nullable Specification<T> spec);

That should be fine :

@Repository
public interface BookRepository extends JpaRepository<Book, Long> , JpaSpecificationExecutor<Book>  {    
}

Note that if many entity attributes may be requested, using a more dynamic approach may be interesting :

public class BookSpecifications {

    private BookSpecifications(){
    }

    public static Specification<Book> withAttribute(String name, T value) {
        return new Specification<Book>() {
            public Predicate toPredicate(Root<Book> root, CriteriaQuery<?> query, CriteriaBuilder cb) {
                return cb.equal(root.get(name), value);
            }
        };
    }

}

But it has as drawback to defer detection of coding errors.
Indeed the errors in the Specification building (for example : value type not compatible) could be detected only at runtime.

0

I would only write this:

@GetMapping
public List<Book> searchBooksByTitleAndAuthor(@RequestParam String title, @RequestParam String author) {
    return bookService.getBooksByTitleAndAuthor(title, author);
}

I'd leave the ResponseEntity creation and HttpStatus management to Spring. As for the null or empty values management, I'd leave that to the service or the database query that follows.

Also, the parameters you wrote in RequestParam annotation are defaults and can be simplified.

Lastly, why would you log all queries? What's the point? If you aim for production, your info log would be spammed by numerous queries and business information doesn't belong to technical logs anyway.

1
  • Note that it may require additional configuration or Spring libraries to work with your project. Also I wrote that by heart and it's not typoproof. – Adrien Brunelat Apr 27 '18 at 14:41
0

There is not great solution for that. If I were you, I will refactor it as:

@GetMapping
public ResponseEntity<List<Book>> searchBooksByTitleAndAuthor(
        @RequestParam(value = "title", required = false) String title,
        @RequestParam(value = "author", required = false) String author) {
    List<Book> books;
    if (StringUtils.isBlank(title) && StringUtils.isBlank(author)) {
        log.info("Empty request");
        return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.BAD_REQUEST);
    } else if (!StringUtils.isBlank(title) && !StringUtils.isBlank(author)) {
        books = bookService.getBooksByTitleAndAuthor(title, author);
    } else if (StringUtils.isBlank(author)) {
        books = bookService.getBooksByTitle(title);
    } else {
        books = bookService.getBooksByAuthor(author);
    }
    if (books.isEmpty()) {
        log.info("No books found with title = " + title + " and author = " + author);
        return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
    }
    return new ResponseEntity<>(books, HttpStatus.OK);
}

With this solution you will treat once the response.


One Tip

When no parameter is send, return a Bad Request saying that this service require at least one parameter.

0

A little nesting might help. This will minimize the duplicate tests. Some code:

if (StringUtils.isNotBlank(blam) || StringUtils.isNotBlank(kapow))
{
    if (StringUtils.isBlank(blam))
    {
        // kapow is not blank.
    }
    else if (StringUtils.isBlank(kapow))
    {
        // blam is not blank.
    }
    else
    {
        // neither kapow nor blam is blank.
    }
}
else
{
   // both empty.  error.
}

I like the answer by Brian, but I would never recommend using Hibernate. MyBatis also supports conditional where clauses.

0

Here is an idea. The code may need some work, in particular I don't know if you can use a static map, but with Spring you probably have a singleton anyway.

private static long toKey(Object ... args) {
    long key = 0L;
    for(int i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
        if(args[i] != null) {
            key |= (1L << i);
        }
    }
    return key;
}

private static interface BookFinder {
    ResponseEntity<List<Book>> search(String title, String author);
}

private static Map<Long, BookFinder> _keyToFinderMap = new HashMap<>();

static {
    _keyToFinderMap.put(toKey(null, null), new BookFinder() {
        public ResponseEntity<List<Book>> search(String title, String author) {
            log.info("Empty request");
            return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
        }
    });
    _keyToFinderMap.put(toKey("", null), new BookFinder() {
        public ResponseEntity<List<Book>> search(String title, String author) {
            log.info("Retrieving books by title");
            List<Book> books = bookService.getBooksByTitle(title);
            if (books.isEmpty()) {
                log.info("No books with this title");
                return new ResponseEntity<>(HttpStatus.NO_CONTENT);
            }
            return new ResponseEntity<>(books, HttpStatus.OK);
        }
    });
    // Other cases
};

@GetMapping
public ResponseEntity<List<Book>> searchBooksByTitleAndAuthor(
        @RequestParam(value = "title", required = false) String title,
        @RequestParam(value = "author", required = false) String author) {
    return _keyToFinderMap.get(toKey(title, author)).search(title, author);
}

If you add a new argument you simply add a new book finder. No if statements. I would move the NO_CONTENT to searchBooksByTitleAndAuthor, but I don't want to change your logging statements. Otherwise that would simplify the finders a bit.

The toKey method can of course be changed, the implementation is not important. It must just map the input combinations to unique keys. The suggested approach handles up to 64 arguments that can be null/not null efficiently.

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