I'm trying to delete a specific line from a 12GB text file.

I do not have the sed -i option available on HP-UX, and other options like saving to a temporary file aren't working because I have only 20GB space available with 12 GB already used by the text file.

Considering the space requirement I'm trying to do this using Perl.

This solution works to delete last 9 lines from a file of 12 GB.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::File;

tie my @lines, 'Tie::File', 'test.txt' or die "$!\n";
$#lines -= 9;
untie @lines;

I want to modify the above code to delete any specific line number.

  • 3
    Delete line number 100: splice @lines, 99, 1; – toolic Apr 27 at 18:00
  • 3
    @Inian That writes a new file and they don't have the space. – Schwern Apr 27 at 18:11
  • 9
    perl -i isn't really in-place; it writes a temp file and replaces the original after the script is done. – chepner Apr 27 at 18:12
  • 3
    UNIX doesn't support this in general -- the filesystem primitives don't let you do in-place deletes without actually needing to rewrite everything past the point where the deletion takes place. Linux has some new kernel-level primitives (supported by only a very small number of filesystems) to do in-place inserts and deletes of blocks, but even then, your changes need to align to 4kb pages. – Charles Duffy Apr 27 at 18:31
  • 3
    How about a 16GB USB Memory Stick for $20? – Mark Setchell Apr 27 at 19:38
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Tie::File is never the answer.

  • It's insanely slow.
  • It can use up more memory than just slurping the entire file into memory, even if you limit the size of its buffer.

You are encountering both of those problems. You encounter every line of the file, so Tie::File will read the entire file and store the index of every line in memory. This takes 28 bytes per line on a 64-bit build of Perl (not counting any overhead in the memory allocator).


To delete the last 9 lines of the file, you can use the following:

use File::ReadBackwards qw( );

my $qfn = '...';

my $pos;
{
   my $bw = File::ReadBackwards->new($qfn)
      or die("Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n");

   for (1..9) {
      defined( my $line = $bw->readline() )
         or last;
   }

   $pos = $bw->tell();
}

# Can't use $bw->get_handle because it's a read-only handle.
truncate($qfn, $pos)
   or die("Can't truncate \"$qfn\": $!\n");

To delete an arbitrary line, you can use the following:

my $qfn = '...';

open(my $fh_src, '<:raw', $qfn)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n");    
open(my $fh_dst, '+<:raw', $qfn)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n");

while (<$fh_src>) {
   next if $. == 9;  # Or "if /keyword/", or whatever condition you want.

   print($fh_dst $_)
      or die($!);
}

truncate($fh_dst, tell($fh_dst))
   or die($!);    

The following optimized version assumes there's only one line (or block of lines) to remove:

use Fcntl qw( SEEK_CUR SEEK_SET );

use constant BLOCK_SIZE => 4*1024*1024;

my $qfn = 'file';

open(my $fh_src, '<:raw', $qfn)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n");
open(my $fh_dst, '+<:raw', $qfn)
   or die("Can't open \"$qfn\": $!\n");

my $dst_pos;
while (1) {
   $dst_pos = tell($fh_src);
   defined( my $line = <$fh_src> )
      or do {
         $dst_pos = undef;
         last;
      };

   last if $. == 9;  # Or "if /keyword/", or whatever condition you want.
}

if (defined($dst_pos)) {
   # We're switching from buffered I/O to unbuffered I/O,
   # so we need to move the system file pointer from where the
   # buffered read left off to where we actually finished reading.
   sysseek($fh_src, tell($fh_src), SEEK_SET)
      or die($!);

   sysseek($fh_dst, $dst_pos, SEEK_SET)
      or die($!);

   while (1) {
      my $rv = sysread($fh_src, my $buf, BLOCK_SIZE);
      die($!) if !defined($rv);
      last if !$rv;

      my $written = 0;
      while ($written < length($buf)) {
         my $rv = syswrite($fh_dst, $buf, length($buf)-$written, $written);
         die($!) if !defined($rv);
         $written += $rv;
      }
   }

   # Must use sysseek instead of tell with sysread/syswrite.    
   truncate($fh_dst, sysseek($fh_dst, 0, SEEK_CUR))
      or die($!);
}
  • 2
    "You need the number of lines in the file..." damn, you're right. Even if you avoid it in the for loop, splice calls FETCHSIZE. – Schwern Apr 27 at 22:57
  • 1
    @Schwern, Simply visiting a line is enough to cache its position, and the OP invariably needs to visit every line (either as part of finding the line to remove, or as part of shifting every line after the "deleted" line). So while avoiding FETCHSIZE would save you from reading the file twice, it won't save you any memory. – ikegami Apr 28 at 0:08
  • Interesting approach! I am curious why would the last version be faster than the second? Is it because it uses read with a buffer size of 4MB instead of readline which I assume uses a buffersize of 8KB? – Håkon Hægland Apr 28 at 4:42
  • 1
    @HåkonHægland, read and readline are both buffered io, so both should use the same buffer. (8 KiB in newer Perls.) /// I meant to use sysread, though you should still get savings from using read. Fewer scalars built, and more time in C/less time in Perl. Will switch to sysread when I can test. – ikegami Apr 28 at 15:10
  • 1
    @HåkonHægland, Switched to sysread and syswrite. – ikegami Apr 28 at 21:05

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