2

I write the following simple c++ program in order to learn about how to call Linux command from C++ program (by using the system command)

Please advice why I have the errors from the C++ compiler? what wrong with my program?

more exm2.cc

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{
  system("echo -n '1. Current Directory is '; pwd");
  system("mkdir temp");
  system();
  system();
  system("echo -n '3. Current Directory is '; pwd");
  return 0;
  }


  [root@linux /tmp]# g++ -Wall  exm2.cc  -o exm2.end

  /usr/include/stdlib.h: In function גint main()ג:
  /usr/include/stdlib.h:738: error: too few arguments to function גint system(conג
  exm2.cc:7: error: at this point in file
  /usr/include/stdlib.h:738: error: too few arguments to function גint system(conג
  exm2.cc:8: error: at this point in file
3
  • 12
    Do you read your error messages before posting? It says the problem right there. – Scott M. Feb 15 '11 at 17:44
  • none of the things you do via system() need to be done via system. See getcwd(), mkdir() etc. system() is terribly non-portable, but neatly masks that until runtime. – Flexo Feb 15 '11 at 17:48
  • 1
    I am very sorry for this but this is the first prog in C++ again sorry and thanx about your great remark – jon Feb 15 '11 at 17:59
11

You can't use system() without a char* parameter.

So these statements are wrong:

system();
system();

If you are not going to make anything, just don't put anything in there.

1
  • 1
    @jon- What were you intending for the line system(); to do? Changing it to system(""); would get rid of the "too few arguments" error but it wouldn't necessarily make the statement useful. – bta Feb 15 '11 at 17:46
11

system() takes at one argument you could call it with an empty string:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{
  system("echo -n '1. Current Directory is '; pwd");
  system("mkdir temp");
  system("");
  system("");
  system("echo -n '3. Current Directory is '; pwd");
  return 0;
  }

But you may as well just leave those lines out :-)

7

the system() function requires a parameter. Try removing the 7th and 8th line.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{
  system("echo -n '1. Current Directory is '; pwd");
  system("mkdir temp");
  system("echo -n '3. Current Directory is '; pwd");
  return 0;
}
4
  • yes you right , I take your remark and from now I will write the name with ".cpp" , thanx allot – jon Feb 15 '11 at 18:05
  • 3
    @jon: No, he's not right. A c++ source file can have any extension you want it to. Some extensions are more common than others. ".cpp" and ".cc" are both perfectly acceptable, and both widely used. – Benjamin Lindley Feb 15 '11 at 18:13
  • @PigBen OK, thanks for your nice correction , it’s wonderful to get professional answers from the best developers in the world great and thanks again – jon Feb 15 '11 at 18:21
  • @PigBen I didn't knew about .cc , Thanks – Alpine Feb 15 '11 at 18:22
2

system takes a const char*. You call it 5 times, passing nothing to it twice.

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