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I have to use template because the requirement is that x, y, z can be of any types (int, float, double, long, etc).

#include <conio.h>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <class T>
class TVector //this class is for creating 3d vectors
{
    T x, y, z;
    public:
    TVector() //default value for x, y, z
    {
        x = 0; 
        y = 0; 
        z = 0;
    }
    TVector(T a, T b, T c)
    {
        x = a; y = b; z = c;
    }

    void output()
    {
        cout << x << endl << y << endl << z;
    }

    //overloading operator + to calculate the sum of 2 vectors (2 objects)
    TVector operator + (TVector vec) 
    {
        TVector vec1;
        vec1.x = this->x + vec.x;
        vec1.y = this->y + vec.y;
        vec1.z = this->z + vec.z;
        return vec1;
    }
};

int main()
{
    TVector<int> v1(5, 1, 33); 
    TVector<float> v2(6.11, 6.1, 5.1);
    TVector<float> v3;    

    v3 = v1 + v2;
    v3.output();

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

If the object v1 was float then the above code would run perfectly. However the requirement is that vector v1 has int as its data type. How do i solve this?

I already tried to use template for overloading + operator, my code looks like this:

template <typename U>
TVector operator+(TVector<U> vec)
{
    TVector vec1;
    vec1.x = this->x + vec.x;
    vec1.y = this->y + vec.y;
    vec1.z = this->z + vec.z;
    return vec1;
}; 

^ Still doesn't work: enter image description here

  • 1
    Better to do this in your default constructor: TVector() : x{}, y{}, z{} { } -- The variables will automatically be initialized to the default values. For basic numeric types, it will be zero-initialized, for other types, whatever the default type for those are will be used. – PaulMcKenzie Apr 28 '18 at 16:22
1

Your problem has nothing (or very little) to do with operator+ overloading. The compiler error says it all: v1 + v2 produces a vector of type TVector<int> (since that's how you defined the operator+), and you trying to assign it to v3 of type TVector<float>. But you haven't defined assignment operator for TVectors of different types (and this is exactly what compiler tells you in the error message)!

  • Ok so i have to overload the "=" operator also? – Trần Đức Hiếu Apr 28 '18 at 15:46
  • 1
    @TrầnĐứcHiếu A TVector<int> is not a TVector<float>. Just because they are based on the same template, TVector, they are totally different types. – PaulMcKenzie Apr 28 '18 at 15:49
  • @TrầnĐứcHiếu yes. similarly to how you did it with operator + (though there was no reason to take by value). Note that, however, the result might be not what you'd expect, since your operator + would truncate results to fit into int before you'd assign in to TVector<float>. – Dan M. Apr 28 '18 at 16:07

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