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I just can't seem to wrap my head around this. I have a regex that check if a string contains a valid CIDR notation address.

(((?:25[012345]|2[0-4]\d|1?\d\d?)\.){3}(?:25[012345]|2[0-4]\d|1?\d\d?))(?:\/([1-9]|[1-2][0-9]|3[0-2]))(?![.\d])

This thing works in Perl, PHP, Javascript, and matches x.x.x.x/8 to y.y.y.y/32.

I've tried to change those \d to [[:digit:]] and to \\d Nothing :(

The test script used to test:

#!/bin/bash

if [ "$1" = "" ]
then
    echo "Usage: $( basename $0) 123.456.789.0/12"
    exit
fi
REGEX1='(((?:25[012345]|2[0-4]\d|1?\d\d?)\.){3}(?:25[012345]|2[0-4]\d|1?\d\d?))(?:\/([1-9]|[1-2][0-9]|3[0-2]))(?![.\d])'
REGEX2='(((?:25[012345]|2[0-4]\\d|1?\\d\\d?)\.){3}(?:25[012345]|2[0-4]\\d|1?\\d\\d?))(?:\\/([1-9]|[1-2][0-9]|3[0-2]))(?![.\\d])'
REGEX3='(((?:25[012345]|2[0-4][[:digit:]]|1?[[:digit:]][[:digit:]]?)\\.){3}(?:25[012345]|2[0-4][[:digit:]]|1?[[:digit:]][[:digit:]]?))(?:\\/([1-9]|[1-2][0-9]|3[0-2]))(?![.[[:digit:]]])'

REGEX=$REGEX3

if [[ $1 =~ $REGEX ]]
then
    echo "$1 OK!"
else
    echo "$1 Not OK! $REGEX"
fi

Any ideas to where to go from here?

Updated. Added working script:

#!/bin/bash

if [ "$1" = "" ]
then
    echo "Usage: $( basename $0) 123.456.789.0/12"
    exit
fi

REGEX='(((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1?[0-9][0-9]?))(\/([8-9]|[1-2][0-9]|3[0-2]))([^0-9.]|$)'

if [[ $1 =~ $REGEX ]]
then
    echo "$1 OK!"
else
    echo "$1 Not OK!"
fi

if echo $1 | grep -Pq $REGEX
then
    echo "grep $1 OK!"
else
    echo "grep $1 Not OK!"
fi
4
  • =~ uses Extended regular expression and not Perl-compatible regular expression (PCRE). – Cyrus Apr 29 '18 at 7:15
  • 1
    If you have GNU grep, you may be able to use the original regular expression with if echo $1|grep -Pq $REGEX. If you need to use POSIX regexes then non-capturing groups are not available ((?:...)) and neither are lookaheads ((?!...)). – Matt Raines Apr 29 '18 at 7:24
  • 2
    You may use (((25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1?[0-9][0-9]?)\.){3}(25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1?[0-9][0-9]?))(\/([1-9]|[1-2][0-9]|3[0-2]))([^0-9.]|$) – revo Apr 29 '18 at 7:30
  • Thanks guys. Matt Raines solution works with grep. Revo's solution works with both =~ and grep. – Mogens TrasherDK Apr 29 '18 at 7:36
4

The shortest path to success is GNU grep, which also supports PCRE:

if echo $CIDR | grep -qP "$REGEX"
then
  echo "$CIDR OK!"
  exit 0
else
  echo "$CIDR NOT OK!"
  exit 1
fi

grep's -q makes it silent and relies on the exit code to determine success. -P is PCRE.

But I should point out that your regex does not fully match that something is a valid CIDR range; rather, you're matching a valid IP address followed by a slash and a number n ∈ 1-32. An additional requirement to CIDR ranges is that the 32-n lower bits of the address are zero, e.g.:

IFS="./" read -r ip1 ip2 ip3 ip4 N <<< $CIDR
ip=$(($ip1 * 256 ** 3 + $ip2 * 256 ** 2 + $ip3 * 256 + $ip4))

if [ $(($ip % 2**(32-$N))) = 0 ]
then
  echo "$CIDR OK!"
  exit 0
else
  echo "$CIDR NOT OK!"
  exit 1
fi

Test this with e.g. 127.0.0.0/24, 127.1.0.0, 127.1.1.0/24.

Or more odd ranges: 10.10.10.8/29, 127.0.0.0/8, 127.3.0.0/10, 192.168.248.0/21.

2
  • I get your point. The input I'm working with are from whois queries, so I assume it's valid CIDR. The final output is: insert into blacklist.cidrlist(cidr, minip, maxip, minint, maxint, created) values('${CIDR}','${MINIP}','${MAXIP}', inet_aton('${MINIP}'), inet_aton('${MAXIP}'), now()); – Mogens TrasherDK Apr 29 '18 at 12:23
  • If you don't need to validate the CIDR range, then you probably don't need to validate the IP address either? If you're extracting CIDR ranges from a file stream, consider grep -Po '(\d+\.){3}\d+/\d+'. I'm sure it won't contain false positives, and it surely fits better on one line. :-) – Simon Shine Apr 29 '18 at 20:03
1

Simon's solution is elegant. :)

I'm not a big fan of complex regexes to validate things that have meaning which should be interpreted in other ways, so alternatively, if you'd prefer to do this more with string manipulation than with math, I wrote the following function a while back:

valid_cidr_network() {
  local ip="${1%/*}"    # strip bits to leave ip address
  local bits="${1#*/}"  # strip ip address to leave bits
  local IFS=.; local -a a=($ip)

  # Sanity checks (only simple regexes)
  [[ $ip =~ ^[0-9]+(\.[0-9]+){3}$ ]] || return 1
  [[ $bits =~ ^[0-9]+$ ]] || return 1
  [[ $bits -gt 32 ]] || return 1

  # Create an array of 8-digit binary numbers from 0 to 255
  local -a binary=({0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1}{0..1})
  local binip=""

  # Test and append values of quads
  for quad in {0..3}; do
    [[ "${a[$quad]}" -gt 255 ]] && return 1
    printf -v binip '%s%s' "$binip" "${binary[${a[$quad]}]}"
  done

  # Fail if any bits are set in the host portion
  [[ ${binip:$bits} = *1* ]] && return 1

  return 0
}

This function assembles an IP address in binary, then fails if any "1"s are set in the host portion of the IP address.

1
  • 1
    Excellent. I like that I can adapt this to log out exactly what was wrong with a CIDR input. – user1169420 Aug 2 '19 at 1:27

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