From this conversation in the Perl 6 IRC channel and a question posted by Martin Barth, I'm trying to reproduce this C code using the Perl6 NativeCall interface, which is used with that purpose. This is what I have tried:

use NativeCall;

my uint32 $num = .new;
my num32 $float = .new: Num(1.0);

sub memcpy(num32 $float, uint32 $num, int32 $size) is native('Str') { * };

memcpy($float,$num,4);
say $num;

This yields an error:

This type cannot unbox to a native integer: P6opaque, Any

Which I interpret as, well, you have declared this as an Integer, I can't turn it into raw memory so that it can be copied from here to there.

This was only a possible way of answering the more general question by Martin Barth: how to turn raw bytes into a floating point number. Maybe there's other way of doing that, but in any case I'd be curious to find out how to turn C programs into NativeCall equivalents.

Update: in the meantime, here's the original question this other post tries to be a solution for.

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Using a union (where all fields share the same memory space) is perhaps the most natural way. Declare a union like this:

my class Convertor is repr<CUnion> {
    has uint32 $.i is rw;
    has num32 $.n is rw;
}

And then use it to do conversion:

my $c = Convertor.new;
$c.i = 0b1000010111101101100110011001101;
say $c.n  # 123.4000015258789

One other issue unrelated to the meat of the question, but present in the posted code: the native integer and number times never need to have a .new done on them, because they are not object types. This:

my uint32 $num = .new;

Should just be:

my uint32 $num;

And:

my num32 $float = .new: Num(1.0);

Should just be:

my num32 $float = 1e0;

The use of the e exponent is what makes a literal a float in Perl 6.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.