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I'm trying: RandomBytes generates random bytes (so, it's enumerable). RandomNBytes is the same but N random bytes (it extends RandomBytes). So, code is:

class RandomBytes : IEnumerable<byte>, IEnumerable {
    public IEnumerator<byte> GetEnumerator() {
        var rnd = new Random();
        while (true) {
            yield return (byte)rnd.Next(0, 255);
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

class RandomNBytes : RandomBytes {
    readonly UInt64 Count;

    RandomNBytes (UInt64 count) {
        Count = count;
    }

    public new IEnumerator<byte> GetEnumerator() {
        return ((IEnumerable<byte>)base).Take(Count);
    }
}

But there is a problem with base, VC raises error: Use of keyword "base" is not valid in this context. How to call Take() over base-class enumerable?

  • 4
    use this instead of base. – HimBromBeere May 2 '18 at 11:53
  • 3
    base can only be used as a way of getting to a specific version of a member, it does not refer to "base version of this", you have to use this for all references to the object instance, which is what you're trying to do here. Unfortunately this doesn't mesh with your code all that well, since it will call the same GetEnumerator. – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen May 2 '18 at 11:55
  • 1
    Super strange, return this.Take(Count).GetEnumerator(); works – Paul-AG May 2 '18 at 11:56
  • 2
    this (in this context) allows you to access methods (and properties etc) or the object itself. base is only to access methods (and properties etc). – mjwills May 2 '18 at 11:58
  • 1
    On the other hand, actually calling your new GetEnumerator, then calling .MoveNext() on the enumerator ends up with a stack overflow exception, as expected. – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen May 2 '18 at 12:13
1

I would do it like this:

public class RandomBytes : IEnumerable<byte>, IEnumerable
{
    public IEnumerator<byte> GetEnumerator()
    {
        //used null, but could also drop the nullable and just pass ulong.MaxValue into the method
        return GetEnumerator(null);
    }
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }

    //extracted the "main" method to a seperate method that takes a count
    protected IEnumerator<byte> GetEnumerator(ulong? count)
    {
        //use ulong.MaxValue when null gets passed, 
        //what ever you are doing with this code 18,446,744,073,709,551,615 iterations should be enough
        var c = count ?? ulong.MaxValue; 

        var rnd = new Random();
        for (ulong i = 0; i < c; i++)
            yield return (byte)rnd.Next(0, 255);
    }
}

public class RandomNBytes : RandomBytes
{
    readonly ulong Count;

    public RandomNBytes(ulong count)
    {
        Count = count;
    }

    public new IEnumerator<byte> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator(Count); //call the protected method
    }
}

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