Let's say I wrote the following class:

public class Metrics {
        private static int metric1 = 0;

        public static int countMetric1() {
                metric1 += 1;
                return 0;
        }

        public static int resetMetric1() {
                int currentCount = metric1;
                metric1 = 0;
                return currentCount;
        }
}

I tested it and it works. But I need also to check metric2. Let's change the code to accommodate that.

public class Metrics {
        private static int metric1 = 0;
        private static int metric2 = 0;

        public static int countMetric1() {
                metric1 += 1;
                return 0;
        }

        public static int resetMetric1() {
                int currentCount = metric1;
                metric1 = 0;
                return currentCount;
        }

        public static int countMetric2() {
                metric2 += 1;
                return 0;
        }

        public static int resetMetric2() {
                int currentCount = metric2;
                metric2 = 0;
                return currentCount;
        }
}

Ok, nice... but definitely not DRY. If I then want to add metric3 or metric4, I'll have again to copy-paste a lot and that's smelly. Is there any way, in Java to refactor this so to avoid repetition and maintain the "staticness" of the code? (Because of the context of the code, things have to be static)

Extra: if this is not possible in Java, is it possible in any other language?

Note 1: This is example code. So no need to fuss over variable names.

Note 2: Any suggestion on how to improve the title of the question would be nice. :)

  • 3
    You know what is smelly aswell? Having attributes metric1, metric2, metric3, ... This seems to be a XY problem. What problem are you actually trying to solve? If you do not want to write getters and setters, take a look at project lombok (caution: Project lombok uses byte code manipulation). – Turing85 May 2 at 18:00
  • 1
    Why do these metrics have to be static? – Compass May 2 at 18:01
  • 2
    If you don't want a separate field for each metric, why not use a map (possibly with an enum key)? You would then have a single count and reset method that accepts an extra enum parameter. – crizzis May 2 at 18:01
  • 1
    Instead of trying to group all your metrics into one class, how about a class called Counter(seems like this is what you are after) that has a count, name, and some public methods for incrementing/resetting? You could create n instances of the class, and keep them in a collection. – Nick DeFazio May 2 at 18:05
  • @Turing85 not to mention how smelly having static attributes metric1, metric2, metric3 is... – crizzis May 2 at 18:07
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The easiest thing to do would be to create a Metric class:

public class Metric {

    private int count = 0;
    private final String name;


    public Metric(final String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return String.format("Metric{name='%s', count=%d}", name, count);
    }

    public int count() {
        return ++count;
    }

    public void reset() {
        count = 0;
    }
}

In your class, you would assign it like this:

private Metric someMetric = new Metric("Whatever you want to measure");

Since you seem to prefer something with static access, how about a simple Map?

public class Metrics {

    private static Map<String, Integer> metricsMap = new HashMap<>();

    public static int countMetric(String metric) {
        int newValue = metricsMap.compute(metric, 
                                          (s, value) -> value == null 
                                          ? 1 : value + 1);
        return newValue - 1 /* old value */;
    }

    public static void resetMetric(String metric){
        metricsMap.remove(metric);
    }
}
  • Nice. It has the disadvantage of losing the "staticness" of the code, though. :) (already edited the question, reflecting this fact) – LLCampos May 3 at 7:58
  • @LLCampos true, but I'm not sure I see that as a disadvantage. – Sean Patrick Floyd May 3 at 17:59
  • @LLCampos added a more static alternative – Sean Patrick Floyd May 3 at 18:12

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