2

I'm trying to create a bash script and take in 2 options

  • bePort and fePort

since this is working

while getopts ":a:b:" opt; do
  case $opt in
    a)
      echo "-a was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    b)
      echo "-b was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    \?)
      echo "Invalid option: -$OPTARG" >&2
      exit 1
      ;;
  esac
done

I run

bash test.sh -a aaa -b bbb

I got

-a was triggered!, Parameter: aaa
-b was triggered!, Parameter: bbb

So then, I've tried this

while getopts ":fe:be:" opt; do
  case $opt in
    fe)
      echo "-fe was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    be)
      echo "-be was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    \?)
      echo "Invalid option: -$OPTARG" >&2
      exit 1
      ;;
  esac
done

But it doesn't seem to work.

I run

bash test.sh -fe 4444 -be 3333

I got nothing printing in my prompt.

I was expecting to see something like this

-be was triggered!, Parameter: 3333
-fe was triggered!, Parameter: 4444

How would one go about debugging this further?

4
  • If you want to handle -fe as a single option, consider using the pattern described in BashFAQ #35 instead of getopts to build your own parsing. May 2, 2018 at 19:54
  • ...that said, this is not standard practice -- see POSIX utility syntax guidelines, specifically guideline #5: One or more options without option-arguments, followed by at most one option that takes an option-argument, should be accepted when grouped behind one '-' delimiter.; and guideline #3: Each option name should be a single alphanumeric character (the alnum character classification) from the portable character set. The -W (capital-W) option shall be reserved for vendor options. May 2, 2018 at 19:55
  • to make a long story short... you get one letter May 2, 2018 at 19:58
  • 1
    If you want long (multiletter) options, the standard is to use a double-dash and separate the value with "=" (as in grep --color=always). But getopts only handles single-letter options, so you need to use something else. Either that, or switch to single-letter options. Frankly, two-letter options are rather weird. May 2, 2018 at 21:42

1 Answer 1

5

It because -fe 4444 is parsed as -f -e 4444.

Test code:

while getopts ":fe:be:" opt; do
  case $opt in
    b)
      echo "-b was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    e)
      echo "-e was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    f)
      echo "-f was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    fe)
      echo "-fe was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    be)
      echo "-be was triggered!, Parameter: $OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
    \?)
      echo "Invalid option: -$OPTARG" >&2
      exit 1
      ;;
  esac
done

Output:

$ bash test.sh -fe 4444 -be 3333
-f was triggered!, Parameter: 
-e was triggered!, Parameter: 4444
-b was triggered!, Parameter: 
-e was triggered!, Parameter: 3333

It is appropriate to use long options like --fe 4444. How to parse long options with bash have been answered at another post.

-> Using getopts in bash shell script to get long and short command line options

5
  • what did you do that I didn't do ? could n't seem to spot it.
    – code-8
    May 2, 2018 at 19:55
  • @kyo, the code here accepts -f and -e as separate options, which is how getopts handles -fe (as one -f followed by a -e). You'll notice that the fe and be cases are never called in the example output, but it has -f output, then -e output, then -b output, then -e output again. May 2, 2018 at 19:56
  • Your code does not handle be and fe together that is my original question.
    – code-8
    May 2, 2018 at 19:58
  • I stil wondering what is the best way to parse long option with bash...
    – set0gut1
    May 2, 2018 at 20:04
  • 3
    @set0gut1 There is no built-in way. Either parse the argument completely manually (by iterating over "$@" yourself), or use a third-party library.
    – chepner
    May 2, 2018 at 21:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.