11

I have two nets and I combine their parameters in some fancy way using only pytorch operations. I store the result in a third net which has its parameters set to non-trainable. Then I proceed and pass data through this new net. The new net is just a placeholder for:

placeholder_net.W = Op( not_trainable_net.W, trainable_net.W )

Then I pass data:

output = placeholder_net(input)

I am concerned that since the parameters of the placeholder net are set to non-trainable that it won’t actually train the variable that it should train. Will this happen? Or what is the result when you combine a trainable param with and non-trainable param (and then set that where the param is not trainable)?


Current solution:

del net3.conv0.weight
net3.conv0.weight = net.conv0.weight + net2.conv0.weight

import torch
from torch import nn
import torch.optim as optim

import torchvision
import torchvision.transforms as transforms

from collections import OrderedDict

import copy

def dont_train(net):
    '''
    set training parameters to false.
    '''
    for param in net.parameters():
        param.requires_grad = False
    return net

def get_cifar10():
    transform = transforms.Compose(
        [transforms.ToTensor(),
         transforms.Normalize((0.5, 0.5, 0.5), (0.5, 0.5, 0.5))])
    trainset = torchvision.datasets.CIFAR10(root='./data', train=True, download=True, transform=transform)
    trainloader = torch.utils.data.DataLoader(trainset, batch_size=4,shuffle=True, num_workers=2)
    classes = ('plane', 'car', 'bird', 'cat','deer', 'dog', 'frog', 'horse', 'ship', 'truck')
    return trainloader,classes



def combine_nets(net_train, net_no_train, net_place_holder):
        '''
            Combine nets in a way train net is trainable
        '''
        params_train = net_train.named_parameters()
        dict_params_place_holder = dict(net_place_holder.named_parameters())
        dict_params_no_train = dict(net_no_train.named_parameters())
        for name, param_train in params_train:
            if name in dict_params_place_holder:
                layer_name, param_name = name.split('.')
                param_no_train = dict_params_no_train[name]
                ## get place holder layer
                layer_place_holder = getattr(net_place_holder, layer_name)
                delattr(layer_place_holder, param_name)
                ## get new param
                W_new = param_train + param_no_train  # notice addition is just chosen for the sake of an example
                ## store param in placehoder net
                setattr(layer_place_holder, param_name, W_new)
        return net_place_holder

def combining_nets_lead_to_error():
    '''
    Intention is to only train the net with trainable params.
    Placeholder rnet is a dummy net, it doesn't actually do anything except hold the combination of params and its the
    net that does the forward pass on the data.
    '''
    device = torch.device("cuda" if torch.cuda.is_available() else "cpu")
    ''' create three musketeers '''
    net_train = nn.Sequential(OrderedDict([
          ('conv1', nn.Conv2d(1,20,5)),
          ('relu1', nn.ReLU()),
          ('conv2', nn.Conv2d(20,64,5)),
          ('relu2', nn.ReLU())
        ])).to(device)
    net_no_train = copy.deepcopy(net_train).to(device)
    net_place_holder = copy.deepcopy(net_train).to(device)
    ''' prepare train, hyperparams '''
    trainloader,classes = get_cifar10()
    criterion = nn.CrossEntropyLoss()
    optimizer = optim.SGD(net_train.parameters(), lr=0.001, momentum=0.9)
    ''' train '''
    net_train.train()
    net_no_train.eval()
    net_place_holder.eval()
    for epoch in range(2):  # loop over the dataset multiple times
        running_loss = 0.0
        for i, (inputs, labels) in enumerate(trainloader, 0):
            optimizer.zero_grad() # zero the parameter gradients
            inputs, labels = inputs.to(device), labels.to(device)
            # combine nets
            net_place_holder = combine_nets(net_train,net_no_train,net_place_holder)
            #
            outputs = net_place_holder(inputs)
            loss = criterion(outputs, labels)
            loss.backward()
            optimizer.step()
            # print statistics
            running_loss += loss.item()
            if i % 2000 == 1999:  # print every 2000 mini-batches
                print('[%d, %5d] loss: %.3f' %
                      (epoch + 1, i + 1, running_loss / 2000))
                running_loss = 0.0
    ''' DONE '''
    print('Done \a')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    combining_nets_lead_to_error()
7
+50

First, do not use eval() mode for any network. Set requires_grad flag to false to make the parameters non-trainable for only the second network and train the placeholder network.

If this doesn't work, you can try the following approach which I prefer.

Instead of using multiple networks, you can use a single network and use a non-trainable layer as a parallel connection after every trainable layer before non-linearity.

For example look at this image:

enter image description here

Set requires_grad flag to false to make the parameters non-trainable. Do not use eval() and train the network.

Combining outputs of the layers before non-linearity is important. Initialize the parameters of the parallel layer and choose the post-operation such that it gives the same result as when you combine the parameters.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    why is using eval for any network bad/incorrect in my case? just curious. – Charlie Parker May 10 '18 at 20:26
  • Modules such as dropout or batchNormalization need to behave differently during training and evaluation. It is not enough to freeze the layers/network and getting the behaviour you want. It is like an additional mode that we need to use for specific modules during non-training. – Ganesh May 11 '18 at 5:38
  • I've only tried your first option because the second option is harder for me to do because the nets I'm using have already been trained. So I'm sort of have two nets that are "fine tuning each other". I can't tell if its not working because the code has a bug or because perhaps the method I am using just doesn't work. Perhaps a good idea would be to make my new data set of size say, 1 and see if it can at least memorize one data point even with this funny training method. – Charlie Parker May 11 '18 at 22:44
  • Ok, I definitively think the first suggestion (at least on my code) doesn't work cuz I just did W+0 and trained W (0 are the non-trainable params) on 1 example on cifar 10 and the net can't learn that 1 example. There must be something wrong... – Charlie Parker May 11 '18 at 23:48
  • note that only when I use the combine_nets code it doesn't work. When I train on the net directly it of course, memorizes the single example, as expected. – Charlie Parker May 12 '18 at 0:41
6

I'm not sure if this is what you want to know.

But when I understand you correct - you want to know if the results of operations with non-trainable and trainable variables are still trainable?

If so, this is indeed the case, here is an example:

>>> trainable = torch.ones(1, requires_grad=True)
>>> non_trainable = torch.ones(1, requires_grad=False)
>>> result = trainable + non_trainable
>>> result.requires_grad
True

Maybe you might also find torch.set_grad_enabled useful, with some examples given here (PyTorch Migration Guide for version 0.4.0):

https://pytorch.org/2018/04/22/0_4_0-migration-guide.html

| improve this answer | |
  • what I want to know is, if I update the result (after passing it through cross entropy) with an the optimizer class, if only the trainable params will change. I guess I can just try it and check if the values of the trainable thing changed or not after optimizer.step() – Charlie Parker May 3 '18 at 13:33
  • So you want do fed data first through a trainable network and than later through a non trainable and your question is if the first network will be trained properly? – MBT May 3 '18 at 15:08
  • no. I want to combine two networks in any way I want with Op (say summation since its the example you suggested) and then I want to pass data through this new network but only train (WLOG) with respect to the trainable network. Semantically, the new network is just a placeholder, it has no real meaning expect as a way to pass data through the combined nets (and perhaps as a way to get gradients for the trainable net). – Charlie Parker May 3 '18 at 15:26
  • Actually I don't think this should be a problem, but I haven't tried. If you're doubtful about it, you can try a simple dummy example with similar structure before - Good luck! – MBT May 3 '18 at 15:41
5

Original answer below, here I address the added code you've uploaded.

in your combine_nets functions you needlessly try to remove and set the attribute, when you can simply copy your required value like this:

def combine_nets(net_train, net_no_train, net_place_holder):
    '''
        Combine nets in a way train net is trainable
    '''
    params_train = net_no_train.named_parameters()
    dict_params_place_holder = dict(net_place_holder.named_parameters())
    dict_params_no_train = dict(net_train.named_parameters())
    for name, param_train in params_train:
        if name in dict_params_place_holder:
            param_no_train = dict_params_no_train[name]
            W_new = param_train + param_no_train 
            dict_params_no_train[name].data.copy_(W_new.data)
    return net_place_holder

Due to other errors in the code you've supplied I couldn't make it run without further changes so I attach below an updated version of the code I've given you earlier:

import torch
from torch import nn
from torch.autograd import Variable
import torch.optim as optim


# toy feed-forward net
class Net(nn.Module):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Net, self).__init__()

        self.fc1 = nn.Linear(10, 5)
        self.fc2 = nn.Linear(5, 5)
        self.fc3 = nn.Linear(5, 1)

    def forward(self, x):
        x = self.fc1(x)
        x = self.fc2(x)
        x = self.fc3(x)
        return x

def combine_nets(net_train, net_no_train, net_place_holder):
    '''
        Combine nets in a way train net is trainable
    '''
    params_train = net_no_train.named_parameters()
    dict_params_place_holder = dict(net_place_holder.named_parameters())
    dict_params_no_train = dict(net_train.named_parameters())
    for name, param_train in params_train:
        if name in dict_params_place_holder:
            param_no_train = dict_params_no_train[name]
            W_new = param_train + param_no_train
            dict_params_no_train[name].data.copy_(W_new.data)
return net_place_holder


# define random data
random_input1 = Variable(torch.randn(10,))
random_target1 = Variable(torch.randn(1,))
random_input2 = Variable(torch.rand(10,))
random_target2 = Variable(torch.rand(1,))
random_input3 = Variable(torch.randn(10,))
random_target3 = Variable(torch.randn(1,))

# define net
net1 = Net()
net_place_holder = Net()
net2 = Net()

# train the net1
criterion = nn.MSELoss()
optimizer = optim.SGD(net1.parameters(), lr=0.1)
for i in range(100):
    net1.zero_grad()
    output = net1(random_input1)
    loss = criterion(output, random_target1)
    loss.backward()
    optimizer.step()

# train the net2
criterion = nn.MSELoss()
optimizer = optim.SGD(net2.parameters(), lr=0.1)
for i in range(100):
    net2.zero_grad()
    output = net2(random_input2)
    loss = criterion(output, random_target2)
    loss.backward()
    optimizer.step()

# train the net2
criterion = nn.MSELoss()
optimizer = optim.SGD(net_place_holder.parameters(), lr=0.1)
for i in range(100):
    net_place_holder.zero_grad()
    output = net_place_holder(random_input3)
    loss = criterion(output, random_target3)
    loss.backward()
    optimizer.step()

print('#'*50)
print('Weights before combining')
print('')
print('net1 fc2 weight after train:')
print(net1.fc3.weight)
print('net2 fc2 weight after train:')
print(net2.fc3.weight)

combine_nets(net1, net2, net_place_holder)

print('#'*50)
print('')
print('Weights after combining')
print('net1 fc2 weight after train:')
print(net1.fc3.weight)
print('net2 fc2 weight after train:')
print(net2.fc3.weight)


# train the net
criterion = nn.MSELoss()
optimizer1 = optim.SGD(net1.parameters(), lr=0.1)
for i in range(100):
    net1.zero_grad()
    net2.zero_grad()
    output1 = net1(random_input3)
    output2 = net2(random_input3)
    loss1 = criterion(output1, random_target3)
    loss2 = criterion(output2, random_target3)
    loss = loss1 + loss2
    loss.backward()
    optimizer1.step()

print('#'*50)
print('Weights after further training')
print('')
print('net1 fc2 weight after freeze:')
print(net1.fc3.weight)
print('net2 fc2 weight after freeze:')
print(net2.fc3.weight)
| improve this answer | |
  • so we don't need to delete the attributes like conv0.weight? Thats what I was suggested on pytorch forum but seemed odd to me...I guess I just need to make sure the right variables are inserted in the computation tree for backwards computations to be done right, correct? What I had in mind was having 3 networks, 2 the real nets Im combining and the 3rd just as a place holder. The placeholder set to eval() and the untrained net also set to eval. But the other not set to eval. Then the placeholder net would hold the combination for the forward coputations to be done right. – Charlie Parker May 7 '18 at 22:13
  • the issue with your code is that your missing the crucial part that is not working my code, the combining the networks. If you try combining the params of one net to the params of another net...it just doesn't work for some reason. – Charlie Parker May 8 '18 at 1:27
  • I pasted my code that combines params if u want to see it...though the code isn’t working...it says the parsms dont have the ‘requires_grad’ flag set to a true. – Charlie Parker May 8 '18 at 1:42
  • @CharlieParker, just to be clear, you want to have three networks N1, N2, N3 and combine them to a network N4 by doing, for every layer i: L1 * L3 + L2 * L3? And you want the backprop to only affect the variables of N1? – ginge May 8 '18 at 8:33
  • Not exactly but that should be enough to solve my problem. Its more like i combine 2 params and want to backprop through net1 – Charlie Parker May 8 '18 at 16:24

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