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This question already has an answer here:

I'm new for golang, this is my program:

func main() {
    checkParam(os.Args)

    var got,bj,ll float32
    var dur int
    var err error

    if bj, err := strconv.ParseFloat(os.Args[1], 32); err != nil {
        usageExit()
    }

    if ll, err := strconv.ParseFloat(os.Args[2], 32); err != nil {
        usageExit()
    }

    if dur, err := strconv.Atoi(os.Args[3]); err != nil {
        usageExit()
    }

    for i := 0; i < dur; i++ {
        got := bj * (1.0 + ll)
    }
    fmt.Print("Result: %f", got)

    _ = got
    _ = bj
    _ = ll
    _ = dur
    _ = err }

But I got errors while running:

gateway@gateway-virtual-machine:basic$ go run fulijisuan.go
command-line-arguments
./fulijisuan.go:27:47: bj declared and not used
./fulijisuan.go:31:47: ll declared and not used
./fulijisuan.go:35:38: dur declared and not used 
./fulijisuan.go:40:22: got declared and not used

In My opinion, I define err/bj/ll/fur/got above, and then use these value to accept Args.

Why I got error? I think I already use these values.

Fix it already, replace := into = .

marked as duplicate by Volker go May 3 '18 at 8:09

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Just assigning to them values doesn't consider as using them. if you don't need to read the value, don't assign to them. – Roee Gavirel May 3 '18 at 8:57
  • This is not a question about unused variables but about new variables in the if scope. – Grzegorz Żur May 3 '18 at 10:06
2

You correctly defined variables but you have not used them. Use them or at least assign to _.

_ = err

In most programming languages you will get at most a warning for having unused variable. Go enforces using every declared variable and will stop compilation with the error you just came across.

By using := in the if block scope you declared new variables with the same names but not used the new ones in that scope.

  • 2
    Why was this answer marked down? It is correct. – nagrom97 May 3 '18 at 9:13
1

In Golang FAQ section the reason for an error of unused variable is mentioned:

The presence of an unused variable may indicate a bug, while unused imports just slow down compilation, an effect that can become substantial as a program accumulates code and programmers over time. For these reasons, Go refuses to compile programs with unused variables or imports, trading short-term convenience for long-term build speed and program clarity.

The variables you have declared should be used in your program at block level inside main scope. that's why the error

func main() {
    checkParam(os.Args)

    var got,bj,ll float32
    var dur int
    var err error

    if bj, err := strconv.ParseFloat(os.Args[1], 32); err != nil {
        usageExit()
    }

    fmt.Println(bj) // use declared variables in your program
}

If you really wants to skip a variable like err you can use _ it like below

bj, _ := strconv.ParseFloat(os.Args[1], 32)
  • Broadly speaking, it's static analysis. This level of check can exist in any language (and indeed it often does--JavaScript, and Perl, which are dynamically typed languages, for instance, have third-party tools which will detect and warn about unused variables). Go has just chosen to put this check into the compiler itself, rather than in a third-party tool. – Flimzy May 3 '18 at 9:13
  • Just like garbage collection I guess – Himanshu May 3 '18 at 9:14
  • If you mean that GC can exist in statically as well as dynamically typed languages, yes, it's similar in that regard. Of course GC isn't a static analysis feature--it's a runtime feature, so in that regard, unrelated :) – Flimzy May 3 '18 at 9:15
  • Thanks @Flimzy for your time. I have also had a look at this FAQ section. It explains the reason why it is an error not a warning. – Himanshu May 3 '18 at 9:16

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