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I'm using ASP.NET Web API 2 and Entity Framework 6 to provide some REST interfaces storing simple data in a SQL Server database. For local development, I'm using LocalDB 2017 and every time I'd like to create or update an object, a DbUpdateConcurrencyException gets thrown when calling SaveChanges(). The detailed error message is:

An exception of type 'System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.DbUpdateConcurrencyException' occurred in EntityFramework.dll but was not handled in user code
Additional information: Store update, insert, or delete statement affected an unexpected number of rows (0). Entities may have been modified or deleted since entities were loaded.

This problem doesn't apply when deleting objects. Furthermore, it doesn't occur when publishing the same code to the staging our production environment where I'm using the full-fledged version of SQL Server.

Since I found some posts that describe problems when using DateTime, I already checked this. But even when trying to persist simple data that are not using a date or time, the problem occurs.

I also made a try to access the staging database from my locally hosted Web API and that worked without any problems. So I think it is related to this specific developer's database.

Any ideas why this exception only occurs with LocalDB and what I can do to avoid?

Here is some sample code:

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using System;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            using (var model = new MyDbModel())
            {
                var objectToCreate = new ApplicationError
                                     {
                                         Date = DateTime.Now,
                                         Username = "mu88",
                                         Exception = "<Exception>Something went wrong</Exception>"
                                     };
                model.ApplicationError.Add(objectToCreate);
                model.SaveChanges();
            }
        }
    }
}

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using System.Data.Entity;

    public class MyDbModel : DbContext
    {
        public MyDbModel()
            : base("name=MyDbModel")
        {
        }

        public virtual IDbSet<ApplicationError> ApplicationError { get; set; }

        protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            modelBuilder.Entity<ApplicationError>().Property(e => e.Username).IsUnicode(false);
        }
    }
}

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    using System;
    using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
    using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.Schema;

    [Table("tblApplicationError")]
    public class ApplicationError
    {
        [Key]
        public int ErrorId { get; set; }

        [Column(TypeName = "xml")]
        public string Exception { get; set; }

        [StringLength(50)]
        public string Username { get; set; }

        public DateTime? Date { get; set; }
    }
}
  • The first thing to do would be to catch the exception and examine it. Loop through the Entires collection and it will give you information about the entity at issue and its state. – jmcilhinney May 3 '18 at 8:39
  • I think you meant the Entries collection, right? I've got the feature, e. g. it's in "Added" state. The values to write are looking good... – mu88 May 3 '18 at 9:52
  • Please add an MCVE. – Gert Arnold May 3 '18 at 10:20
  • @GertArnold Done – mu88 May 3 '18 at 11:29
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I "solved" it on my own. The problem was related to the fact that somehow all the Primary Key definitions and indices got lost during Restore. So I've deleted the LocalDB database, created a fresh backup from the production database and restored it into again. Now it is working.

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