2

I have a multi-line string:

let str = 'line first \n     line-second-preceded-with-a-few-spaces';

I would like to inject it into HTML code. I managed to replace all spaces with replace(/ /g, '\u00a0') and I would like to do the same with \n but none of the Unicode values mentioned in Wikipedia seem to work.

The Unicode standard defines a number of characters that conforming applications should recognize as line terminators:

LF:    Line Feed, U+000A
VT:    Vertical Tab, U+000B
FF:    Form Feed, U+000C
CR:    Carriage Return, U+000D
CR+LF: CR (U+000D) followed by LF (U+000A)
NEL:   Next Line, U+0085
LS:    Line Separator, U+2028
PS:    Paragraph Separator, U+2029
{str.replace(/ /g, '\u00a0').replace(/(?:\r\n|\r|\n)/g, '\u000a')}

What is the proper way to do that?

2
  • 3
    Just use CSS white-space: pre-wrap, none of this hacking around with unicode nonsense... Especially not when you're using non-breaking space which is not the same thing at all. May 3 '18 at 14:18
  • thank you Niet the Dark Absol , simple and perfect !
    – Gooloosh
    Nov 26 '19 at 7:34
5

You can replace \n with break line <br/> and then add as innerHTML like

let str = 'line first \n     line-second-preceded-with-a-few-spaces';
str = str.replace(/ /g, '\u00a0');
str = str.split("\n").join("<br/>")
document.getElementById("d").innerHTML = str;
<div id="d"></div>

Or you use replace(/\n/g, "<br/>");. This would also do the same

let str = 'line first \n     line-second-preceded-with-a-few-spaces';
str = str.replace(/ /g, '\u00a0').replace(/\n/g, "<br/>");
document.getElementById("d").innerHTML = str;
<div id="d"></div>

Or you can also wrap your string containing \n and " " in pre tag to treat them as new line characters and white spaces

let str = 'line first \n     line-second-preceded-with-a-few-spaces';

document.getElementById("d").innerHTML = `<pre>${str}</pre>`;
<div id="d"></div>

Note : The pre element should be used for text that has typographic formatting that affects the meaning of the content, such as in poems, ASCII art, transcripts, and, of course, computer code

4
  • 2
    Another option would be to replace the \ns with newline Unicode characters and place the whole text inside a <pre> tag.
    – apaatsio
    May 3 '18 at 14:14
  • But why <pre> tag changes the background color? o.O
    – Malvinka
    May 3 '18 at 14:23
  • 1
    By default, browsers will display the content inside a pre element using a monospaced (or fixed-width) font such as Courier or Monaco here May 3 '18 at 14:26
  • The pre element should be used for text that has typographic formatting that affects the meaning of the content, such as in poems, ASCII art, transcripts, and, of course, computer code. May 3 '18 at 14:27

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