12

I have two dataframes looking like

df1:

   ID    A   B   C   D 
0 'ID1' 0.5 2.1 3.5 6.6
1 'ID2' 1.2 5.5 4.3 2.2
2 'ID1' 0.7 1.2 5.6 6.0 
3 'ID3' 1.1 7.2 10. 3.2

df2:

   ID    A   B   C   D 
0 'ID1' 1.0 2.0 3.3 4.4
1 'ID2' 1.5 5.0 4.0 2.2
2 'ID3' 0.6 1.2 5.9 6.2 
3 'ID4' 1.1 7.2 8.5 3.0

df1 can have multiple entries with the same ID whereas each ID occurs only once in df2. Also not all ID in df2 are necessarily present in df1. I can't solve this by using set_index() as multiple rows in df1 can have the same ID, and that the ID in df1 and df2 are not aligned.

I want to create a new dataframe where I subtract the values in df2[['A','B','C','D']] from df1[['A','B','C','D']] based on matching the ID.

The resulting dataframe would look like:

df_new:

   ID     A    B   C   D 
0 'ID1' -0.5  0.1 0.2 2.2
1 'ID2' -0.3  0.5 0.3 0.0
2 'ID1' -0.3 -0.8 2.3 1.6
3 'ID3'  0.5  6.0 1.5 0.2

I know how to do this with a loop, but since I'm dealing with huge data quantities this is not practical at all. What is the best way of approaching this with Pandas?

14

You just need set_index and subtract

(df1.set_index('ID')-df2.set_index('ID')).dropna(axis=0)
Out[174]: 
         A    B    C    D
ID                       
'ID1' -0.5  0.1  0.2  2.2
'ID1' -0.3 -0.8  2.3  1.6
'ID2' -0.3  0.5  0.3  0.0
'ID3'  0.5  6.0  4.1 -3.0

If the order is matter adding reindex for df2

(df1.set_index('ID')-df2.set_index('ID').reindex(df1.ID)).dropna(axis=0).reset_index()
Out[211]: 
      ID    A    B    C    D
0  'ID1' -0.5  0.1  0.2  2.2
1  'ID2' -0.3  0.5  0.3  0.0
2  'ID1' -0.3 -0.8  2.3  1.6
3  'ID3'  0.5  6.0  4.1 -3.0
  • The second solution was exactly what I needed, as the order does indeed matter for the usage of the resulting dataframe later in the process. – AstroAT May 4 '18 at 9:18
  • @AndersT ah:-) happy coding – WeNYoBen May 4 '18 at 13:04
7

Similarly to what Wen (who beat me to it) proposed, you can use pd.DataFrame.subtract:

df1.set_index('ID').subtract(df2.set_index('ID')).reset_index()

         A    B    C    D
ID                       
'ID1' -0.5  0.1  0.2  2.2
'ID1' -0.3 -0.8  2.3  1.6
'ID2' -0.3  0.5  0.3  0.0
'ID3'  0.5  6.0  4.1 -3.0
  • 1
    Note you do lose the order of the original dataframe. This may or may not be important. – jpp May 3 '18 at 15:10
2

One method is to use numpy. We can extract the ordered indices required from df2 using numpy.searchsorted.

Then feed this into the construction of a new dataframe.

idx = np.searchsorted(df2['ID'], df1['ID'])

res = pd.DataFrame(df1.iloc[:, 1:].values - df2.iloc[:, 1:].values[idx],
                   index=df1['ID']).reset_index()

print(res)

      ID    0    1    2    3
0  'ID1' -0.5  0.1  0.2  2.2
1  'ID2' -0.3  0.5  0.3  0.0
2  'ID1' -0.3 -0.8  2.3  1.6
3  'ID3'  0.5  6.0  4.1 -3.0
  • I can understand why it was downvoted. It wasn't me by the way. Some might think it's not very pythonic compared to more simpler solutions. Run this: import this. – floydn May 3 '18 at 15:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.