194

Can anyone point me to some code to determine if a number in JavaScript is even or odd?

  • 6
  • 1
    @DavidThomas I partly agree, but I have two caveats: 1. If I had to choose, I'd rather a beginner programmer knew about the % operator than &, and 2. While & is theoretically faster, it really doesn't matter. – kojiro Aug 12 '12 at 23:11
  • 3
    @kojiro: I'd rather more (valid) options be presented to a learner; plus I hadn't ever thought to use bitwise-& in this manner before, so it's an interesting take. Anyway, since it is a dupe, I've flagged for merger with the pre-existing question. Hopefully, then, the answers here (that particular answer at least), won't be lost. – David Thomas Aug 12 '12 at 23:14
  • 1
    @kojiro I'm afraid to say that your fiddle is quite useless, since most of the computational time is taken by the function calls. But nobody will use a function call to determine if a number is odd or even... I made a third revision of your test, but I'm on my phone now... – MaxArt Aug 13 '12 at 1:05
  • 1
    possible duplicate of Testing whether a value is odd or even – bummi Mar 17 '15 at 14:36

26 Answers 26

288

Use the below code:

function isOdd(num) { return num % 2;}
console.log("1 is " + isOdd(1));
console.log("2 is " + isOdd(2));
console.log("3 is " + isOdd(3));
console.log("4 is " + isOdd(4));

1 represents an odd number, while 0 represents an even number.

  • 90
    Note that this will return 0 or 1 (or NaN if you feed it something that isn't a number and can't be coerced into one), which will work fine for most situations. But if you want a real true or false: return (num % 2) == 1; – T.J. Crowder Feb 16 '11 at 12:20
  • 3
    yea good note about the NaN. But usually, you want javascript to be truthy or falsey, which is why i wrote it the way i did. – Chii Feb 16 '11 at 12:24
  • 9
    Just to clarify, the modulo operator (%) gives the remainder of a division. So 3%2 would be 3/2, leaving 1 as a remainder, therefore 3%2 will return 1. – Abuh Feb 16 '11 at 12:24
  • 6
    Further to what T.J. said, this will return a fraction if num isn't an integer. Which will still work if you compare isOdd(1.5)==true (because a fractional value is not equal to true), but it would be better if the function returned true or false as implied by the name "isOdd". – nnnnnn Aug 13 '12 at 2:02
  • 5
    You can also do return !!(num % 2) to get a boolean – Duncan Jan 30 '16 at 14:00
95

Use the bitwise AND operator.

function oddOrEven(x) {
  return ( x & 1 ) ? "odd" : "even";
}

If you don't want a string return value, but rather a boolean one, use this:

var isOdd = function(x) { return x & 1; };
var isEven  = function(x) { return !( x & 1 ); };
  • 5
    +1, you're answer definitely beats mine, not to mention that you have the only answer that does not use X % Y! – s0d4pop Aug 12 '12 at 22:52
  • 4
    I'm not sure if my test is accurate, but the bitwise AND seems to be 40 times slower than the modulo operator for a fixed number and 2 times slower for a random number: jsperf.com/odd-or-even – Blender Aug 12 '12 at 22:59
  • 7
    Note that this will return "odd" or "even" for numbers that are not either (e.g., 3.14). – nnnnnn Aug 12 '12 at 23:02
  • 2
    Or: function isEven(n){return !(n & 1);}. – RobG Aug 12 '12 at 23:15
  • 6
    @Gnuey Every number is comprised of a series of bits. All odd numbers have the least-significant (rightmost) bit set to 1, all even numbers 0. The x & 1 checks if the last bit is set in the number (because 1 Is a number with all bits set to 1 except for the least significant bit): If it is, the number is odd, otherwise even. – 0x499602D2 Aug 30 '13 at 13:01
24

You could do something like this:

function isEven(value){
    if (value%2 == 0)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}
  • 2
    ..or what Chii said - haha – TNC Feb 16 '11 at 12:21
  • 8
    It doesn't seem like you know what a boolean is. if (condition) { answer=true; } else { answer=false; } is just a needlessly wordy version of answer = (bool) condition;. Reduce your function to function isEven(value) { return (bool) (value%2 == 0); } and we'll all be happy. – awm Feb 16 '11 at 12:28
  • 6
    No need to get snarky, because I program something differently. – TNC Feb 16 '11 at 12:36
  • 3
    @awm - It seems like you don't know JavaScript. You can't cast to boolean with (bool) (that'll give an error) and in any case you don't need to: return value%2 == 0; will do the job since the == operator returns a boolean. – nnnnnn Aug 13 '12 at 1:55
  • 2
    Wow, did I really write that? Yes, that's obviously wrong; should be something like answer = !!(condition). The point I was trying to make, of course is that you can just return value%2==0 and don't need to bother with the conditional. – awm Aug 13 '12 at 4:53
17
function isEven(x) { return (x%2)==0; }
function isOdd(x) { return !isEven(x); }
11

Do I have to make an array really large that has a lot of even numbers

No. Use modulus (%). It gives you the remainder of the two numbers you are dividing.

Ex. 2 % 2 = 0 because 2/2 = 1 with 0 remainder.

Ex2. 3 % 2 = 1 because 3/2 = 1 with 1 remainder.

Ex3. -7 % 2 = -1 because -7/2 = -3 with -1 remainder.

This means if you mod any number x by 2, you get either 0 or 1 or -1. 0 would mean it's even. Anything else would mean it's odd.

  • 4
    +1 for explaining how the operator works. – bfavaretto Aug 12 '12 at 22:52
  • 2
    "Anything else would mean it's odd." - Or that it's not an integer... – nnnnnn Aug 12 '12 at 23:03
8

This can be solved with a small snippet of code:

function isEven(value) {
    if (value%2 == 0)
    return true;
else
    return false;
}

Hope this helps :)

  • 4
    or return value % 2 == 0 – 0x499602D2 Nov 30 '12 at 19:56
6

Like many languages, Javascript has a modulus operator %, that finds the remainder of division. If there is no remainder after division by 2, a number is even:

// this expression is true if "number" is even, false otherwise
(number % 2 == 0)

This is a very common idiom for testing for even integers.

  • 3
    However, modulus can be tricky/undefined for negative values .. be sure to consult the appropriate language specification. – user166390 Aug 12 '12 at 22:54
5

A simple function you can pass around. Uses the modulo operator % and the ternary operator ?.

var is_even = function(x) {
    return !(x % 2); 
}

is_even(3)
false
is_even(6)
true
  • 1
    If your results in the ternary operator are either 'true' or 'false', you really don't need the ternary operator. Here, you could/should just do: return !(x % 2); – dom_watson Jun 14 '17 at 8:36
5

With bitwise, codegolfing:

var isEven=n=>(n&1)?"odd":"even";
4

Use my extensions :

Number.prototype.isEven=function(){
     return this % 2===0;
};

Number.prototype.isOdd=function(){
     return !this.isEven();
}

then

var a=5; 
 a.isEven();

==False

 a.isOdd();

==True

if you are not sure if it is a Number , test it by the following branching :

if(a.isOdd){
    a.isOdd();
}

UPDATE :

if you would not use variable :

(5).isOdd()

Performance :

It turns out that Procedural paradigm is better than OOP paradigm . By the way , i performed profiling in this FIDDLE . However , OOP way is still prettiest .

enter image description here

3

Subtract 2 to it recursively until you reach either -1 or 0 (only works for positive integers obviously) :)

  • With negative numbers you instead increase 2 to it – Hydroper Feb 7 '17 at 16:34
  • And it takes a hell of a time when n=2^52, and an infinite amount for n>2^53 – rioV8 Aug 3 '18 at 14:12
3

You can use a for statement and a conditional to determine if a number or series of numbers is odd:

for (var i=1; i<=5; i++) 
if (i%2 !== 0) {
    console.log(i)
}

This will print every odd number between 1 and 5.

3

Just executed this one in Adobe Dreamweaver..it works perfectly. i used if (isNaN(mynmb))

to check if the given Value is a number or not, and i also used Math.abs(mynmb%2) to convert negative number to positive and calculate

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>

</head>
<body bgcolor = "#FFFFCC">
    <h3 align ="center"> ODD OR EVEN </h3><table cellspacing = "2" cellpadding = "5" bgcolor="palegreen">
        <form name = formtwo>
            <td align = "center">
                <center><BR />Enter a number: 
                    <input type=text id="enter" name=enter maxlength="10" />
                    <input type=button name = b3 value = "Click Here" onClick = compute() />
                      <b>is<b> 
                <input type=text id="outtxt" name=output size="5" value="" disabled /> </b></b></center><b><b>
                <BR /><BR />
            </b></b></td></form>
        </table>

    <script type='text/javascript'>

        function compute()
        {
          var enter = document.getElementById("enter");
          var outtxt = document.getElementById("outtxt");

          var mynmb = enter.value;
          if (isNaN(mynmb)) 
          { 
            outtxt.value = "error !!!"; 
            alert( 'please enter a valid number');
            enter.focus();
            return;
          }
          else 
          { 
             if ( mynmb%2 == 0 ) { outtxt.value = "Even"; }  
             if ( Math.abs(mynmb%2) == 1 ) { outtxt.value = "Odd"; }
          }
        }

    </script>
</body>
</html>
3
   <script>
        function even_odd(){
            var num =   document.getElementById('number').value;

            if ( num % 2){
                document.getElementById('result').innerHTML = "Entered Number is Odd";
            }
            else{
                document.getElementById('result').innerHTML = "Entered Number is Even";
            }
        }
    </script>
</head>
<body>
    <center>
        <div id="error"></div>
        <center>
            <h2> Find Given Number is Even or Odd </h2>
            <p>Enter a value</p>
            <input type="text" id="number" />
            <button onclick="even_odd();">Check</button><br />
            <div id="result"><b></b></div>
        </center>
    </center>
</body>
3

The often misunderstood meaning of Odd

Only an integer can be odd.

  • isOdd("someString") should be false.
    A string is not an integer.
  • isOdd(1.223) and isOdd(-1.223) should be false.
    A float is not an integer.
  • isOdd(0) should be false.
    Zero is an even integer (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parity_of_zero).
  • isOdd(-1) should be true.
    It's an odd integer.

Solution

function isOdd(n) {

  // Must be a number
  if (isNaN(n)) {
    return false;
  }

  // Number must not be a float
  if ((n % 1) !== 0) {
    return false;
  }

  // Integer must not be equal to zero
  if (n === 0) {
    return false;
  }

  // Integer must be odd
  if ((n % 2) !== 0) {
    return true;
  }

  return false;
}

JS Fiddle (if needed): https://jsfiddle.net/9dzdv593/8/

1-liner

Javascript 1-liner solution. For those who don't care about readability.

const isOdd = n => !(isNaN(n) && ((n % 1) !== 0) && (n === 0)) && ((n % 2) !== 0) ? true : false;
  • You can accelerate the solution yet. i.e., in the final statements you can just return !!(n % 2) , this will optionally make it work with signed numbers (i.e., when n % 2 returns 0, it's false, but when -1 or 1 returned, this would return true). Your solution is actually returning false for odd numbers since it's checking if the modulus return is 0, but should check for 1, and 1 would fail for negative numbers, thus return !!(n % 2) is safer. And anyways, {} (block statement) doesn't cause minification issues and is not present in the discussion. – Hydroper Feb 7 '17 at 17:05
  • @TheProHands - Thanks for the notes. (1) The issue was that the Modulus Version had a typo; it should have been (n % 2) !== 0 instead of (n % 2) === 0. (2) My advice is to avoid !!(n % 2), because (a) it has slower performance than (n % 2) !== 0 (jsperf.com/notnot-vs-strict-not), (b) it's a hack - it coerces a falsey value 0 into false, and (c) it's obscure (high-level programming languages shouldn't read like Pascal at the sake of performance - that's the compiler's job). (3) Yes, missing {} block statements do result in several issues (as updated in my answer). – tfmontague Feb 8 '17 at 11:17
  • I never avoid block statements because I care about readability, but I'm trying to tell that seeking block statements doesn't result in issues, only in the code maintainace. I.e., using sequence expressions merged with expression statement instead of block statement might make the code unreadable and ugly, i.e.: if (0) call1(), assign = 0, call2(), but a single statement isn't bad: if (0) return; if (0) ;; if (0); break; if (0) continue;, and anyways I prefer to continue using break-line block statements when I've long-inline conditions. – Hydroper Feb 8 '17 at 12:04
  • type/null checks like your isNaN(n) are silly - sure you covered the NaN case, but isOdd(null), isOdd(undefined), isOdd({x:1}) all return false which I consider to be an error; unless of course you're only specifying that your function has correct behaviour over a given domain: only Number-type inputs. In which case, just drop the isNaN check and force the user to call it with the correct type. Defensive programming is awful. Then your function is simplified to isOdd = x => Math.floor(x) === x && x & 1 === 1 – returning explicit true or false values is not necessary – user633183 Mar 31 '17 at 8:34
  • null, undefined and objects {} are not odd integers, and therefore the function returns false - not sure why you consider that an error. The isNaN check is for performance (not for defense), it lets the function exit prematurely without performing the other checks. – tfmontague May 11 at 19:20
2
if (X % 2 === 0){
} else {
}

Replace X with your number (can come from a variable). The If statement runs when the number is even, the Else when it is odd.

If you just want to know if any given number is odd:

if (X % 2 !== 0){
}

Again, replace X with a number or variable.

2

Every odd number when divided by two leaves remainder as 1 and every even number when divided by zero leaves a zero as remainder. Hence we can use this code

  function checker(number)  {
   return number%2==0?even:odd;
   }
2

How about this...

    var num = 3 //instead get your value here
    var aa = ["Even", "Odd"];

    alert(aa[num % 2]);
  • 1
    only one that seems to be working... thanks – sputn1k Aug 22 '15 at 18:46
2

This is what I did

//Array of numbers
var numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,32,23,643,67,5876,6345,34,3453];
//Array of even numbers
var evenNumbers = [];
//Array of odd numbers
var oddNumbers = [];

function classifyNumbers(arr){
  //go through the numbers one by one
  for(var i=0; i<=arr.length-1; i++){
     if (arr[i] % 2 == 0 ){
        //Push the number to the evenNumbers array
        evenNumbers.push(arr[i]);
     } else {
        //Push the number to the oddNumbers array
        oddNumbers.push(arr[i]);
     }
  }
}

classifyNumbers(numbers);

console.log('Even numbers: ' + evenNumbers);
console.log('Odd numbers: ' + oddNumbers);

For some reason I had to make sure the length of the array is less by one. When I don't do that, I get "undefined" in the last element of the oddNumbers array.

  • 2
    It's because the condition is set to less to or equal "<=" to the length of the array. I removed the equal sign and is the result was as desired. – Zakher Masri Mar 16 '15 at 14:27
2

When you need to test if some variable is odd, you should first test if it is integer. Also, notice that when you calculate remainder on negative number, the result will be negative (-3 % 2 === -1).

function isOdd(value) {
  return typeof value === "number" && // value should be a number
    isFinite(value) &&                // value should be finite
    Math.floor(value) === value &&    // value should be integer
    value % 2 !== 0;                  // value should not be even
}

If Number.isInteger is available, you may also simplify this code to:

function isOdd(value) {
  return Number.isInteger(value)      // value should be integer
    value % 2 !== 0;                  // value should not be even
}

Note: here, we test value % 2 !== 0 instead of value % 2 === 1 is because of -3 % 2 === -1. If you don't want -1 pass this test, you may need to change this line.

Here are some test cases:

isOdd();         // false
isOdd("string"); // false
isOdd(Infinity); // false
isOdd(NaN);      // false
isOdd(0);        // false
isOdd(1.1);      // false
isOdd("1");      // false
isOdd(1);        // true
isOdd(-1);       // true
2

Using % will help you to do this...

You can create couple of functions to do it for you... I prefer separte functions which are not attached to Number in Javascript like this which also checking if you passing number or not:

odd function:

var isOdd = function(num) {
  return 'number'!==typeof num ? 'NaN' : !!(num % 2);
};

even function:

var isEven = function(num) {
  return isOdd(num)==='NaN' ? isOdd(num) : !isOdd(num);
};

and call it like this:

isOdd(5); // true
isOdd(6); // false
isOdd(12); // false
isOdd(18); // false
isEven(18); // true
isEven('18'); // 'NaN'
isEven('17'); // 'NaN'
isOdd(null); // 'NaN'
isEven('100'); // true
2

A more functional approach in modern javascript:

const NUMBERS = "nul one two three four five six seven ocho nueve".split(" ")

const negate = f=> (...args)=> !f(...args)
const isOdd  = n=> NUMBERS[n % 10].indexOf("e")!=-1
const isEven = negate(isOdd)
  • Very funny..... – MikeM May 7 at 16:10
2

One liner in ES6 just because it's clean.

const isEven = (num) => num % 2 == 0;

1

I'd implement this to return a boolean:

function isOdd (n) {
    return !!(n % 2);
    // or ((n % 2) !== 0).
}

It'll work on both unsigned and signed numbers. When the modulus return -1 or 1 it'll get translated to true.

Non-modulus solution:

var is_finite = isFinite;
var is_nan = isNaN;

function isOdd (discriminant) {
    if (is_nan(discriminant) && !is_finite(discriminant)) {
        return false;
    }

    // Unsigned numbers
    if (discriminant >= 0) {
        while (discriminant >= 1) discriminant -= 2;

    // Signed numbers
    } else {
        if (discriminant === -1) return true;
        while (discriminant <= -1) discriminant += 2;
    }

    return !!discriminant;
}
1
        var sumSoFar = 0;
var oddnumber=0;
function Sum(data){
   for(var i=0;i<data.length;i++){
 if(data[i] % 2 == 1){
 console.log(data[i]);
 sumSoFar += data[i];
 }else{
 oddnumber+= data[i];
 }  }
   console.log(sumSoFar);
   console.log(oddnumber);
}
var sumOfNum=Sum([3,2,4,5,4,3,3,4,3,6,4]);
0

By using ternary operator, you we can find the odd even numbers:

var num = 2;
result = (num % 2 == 0) ? 'even' : 'odd'
console.log(result);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.