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I am using Boost Interprocess to create an interprocess::vector in shared memory. I templated my class, so that I could store any type of object in the memory:

using namespace boost::interprocess;

template<typename T>
struct MySharedData
{
    using ShmemAllocator = allocator<T, managed_shared_memory::segment_manager>;
    using MyVector = vector<T, ShmemAllocator>;

    MySharedData()
    {
        segment.reset(new managed_shared_memory(open_or_create, "memory", 10000));
        const ShmemAllocator alloc_inst(segment->get_segment_manager());
        vec = segment->find_or_construct<MyVector>("vector")(alloc_inst);
    }

    //...
    //...

    MyVector*                               vec{nullptr};
    std::unique_ptr<managed_shared_memory>  segment{nullptr};
}

and I added elements by simply calling:

vec->push_back(element);

During testing I templated my class using int, which worked fine. However, when I later used my complex object, consisting of:

struct Complex
{
    std::string x;
    std::string y;
    double a;
    int b;
};

I encountered segmentation faults shortly after iterating through the vector and accessing the elements:

std::vector<T> read()

    // Mutex and condition variable stuff here

    std::vector<T> toReturn;

    for(auto& t : *vec)
    {
        toReturn.push_back(t);
    }

    return toReturn;
}

I was reading this page:

https://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_60_0/doc/html/interprocess/allocators_containers.html

and it mentions "containers of containers" require the element type to have their own allocator.

Does my Complex struct require this too, because a string makes my vector a container of container (of chars) and would it explain why I was experiencing segmentation faults whilst iterating over the elements?

0

Does my Complex struct require this too, because a string makes my vector a container of container (of chars) and would it explain why I was experiencing segmentation faults whilst iterating over the elements?

Yes, and yes.

I don't have time to create a self contained example out of your code snippets, but here are some links describing exactly what you want to do:

  • The part I'm worried about is the classes which will be stored in this shared vector are declared elsewhere in my code base- they are totally unaware of Boost Interprocess and so I'm hoping I don't have to go and include Boost Interprocess headers where they are defined, to then create the allocators etc. – mezamorphic May 4 '18 at 0:39
  • As long as you can instantiate those classes with allocators, you are fine. If they don't support custom allocators (in particular, stateful allocators) then you will not be able to store them in the memory segment (unless, of course, they do not allocate at all) – sehe May 4 '18 at 1:32

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