564

I've created database, for example 'mydb'.

CREATE DATABASE mydb CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin;
CREATE USER 'myuser'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY PASSWORD '*HASH';
GRANT ALL ON mydb.* TO 'myuser'@'%';
GRANT ALL ON mydb TO 'myuser'@'%';
GRANT CREATE ON mydb TO 'myuser'@'%';
FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Now i can login to database from everywhere, but can't create tables.

How to grant all privileges on that database and (in the future) tables. I can't create tables in 'mydb' database. I always get:

CREATE TABLE t (c CHAR(20) CHARACTER SET utf8 COLLATE utf8_bin);
ERROR 1142 (42000): CREATE command denied to user 'myuser'@'...' for table 't'
  • 10
    What do you get when you SHOW GRANTS FOR CURRENT_USER; – diagonalbatman Feb 16 '11 at 12:40
  • 5
    Have you tried running FLUSH PRIVILEGES ? – Romain Feb 16 '11 at 12:45
  • 1
    @Andy Thanks for "SHOW GRANTS FOR CURRENT_USER;" - that helps me see my typo. – marioosh Feb 16 '11 at 12:56
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    @Romain, flush privileges is not needed when you use grant commands. x4 – Pacerier Jan 14 '15 at 10:40
  • 1
    You should use FLUSH PRIVILEGES; only if you modify the grant tables directly using statements such as INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE – simhumileco Nov 7 '17 at 10:37

10 Answers 10

843
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON mydb.* TO 'myuser'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

This is how I create my "Super User" privileges (although I would normally specify a host).

IMPORTANT NOTE

While this answer can solve the problem of access, WITH GRANT OPTION creates a MySQL user that can edit the permissions of other users.

The GRANT OPTION privilege enables you to give to other users or remove from other users those privileges that you yourself possess.

For security reasons, you should not use this type of user account for any process that the public will have access to (i.e. a website). It is recommended that you create a user with only database privileges for that kind of use.

  • 34
    @Romain you are not really bringing alot to the table here - i don't name my users myuser - the questioner was simply using a username as an example - i used the same example username for consistency. – diagonalbatman Feb 16 '11 at 13:44
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    Fair enough. But one has to also think about the other people, possibly newbies, that could come read this question later on. Isn't it the point of SO as well? – Romain Feb 18 '11 at 13:46
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    I also don't think this answer is the good one. It gives "administrator" privileges on all databases and all tables, which is not what was asked. – daks Feb 6 '14 at 13:17
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    I edited this answer to say mydb.* instead of ., since it's such a widely upvoted and viewed answer, and I believe security--especially with a polished turd like MySQL--is extremely important. One would hope that a reader would investigate the details of the answer rather than copy and paste, but I like to live in reality occasionally. – Jordan Sep 12 '14 at 18:15
  • 3
    @Romain Users setting up an MySQL server are likely intelligent enough to realise that they should replace myuser with their own custom username. – AStopher Feb 18 '15 at 0:19
490

This is old question but I don't think the accepted answer is safe. It's good for creating a super user but not good if you want to grant privileges on a single database.

grant all privileges on mydb.* to myuser@'%' identified by 'mypasswd';
grant all privileges on mydb.* to myuser@localhost identified by 'mypasswd';

% seems to not cover socket communications, that the localhost is for. WITH GRANT OPTION is only good for the super user, otherwise it is usually a security risk.

Hope this helps.

  • 19
    +1 for not including WITH GRANT OPTION and targeting a specified database instead of all (*). – Adonis K. Kakoulidis Nov 16 '13 at 13:27
  • @IanBussieres the grammar of "% seems to not cover socket communications, that the localhost is for" is unclear. What does this actually mean? – Thufir Jun 26 '14 at 8:19
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    @Thufir, search for unix sockets. When using localhost myslq client on linux is trying to use a unix socket instead of a TCP connection to the server. – akostadinov Jun 26 '14 at 9:38
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    Note that you probably don't need the first command unless you want access from outside IP addresses, or from other computers on the local subnet. If you do, I would recommend using commands that are targeted to the specific IP addresses that you want to allow, such as myuser@192.168.0.1 (for one on the local subnet), rather than myuser@% generally. – Evan Donovan Feb 14 '17 at 2:06
  • @EvanDonovan, there are a lot of things here that depend on use case as well environment. For example java driver does not support socket transport at all IIRC. But generally I agree - better specify specific IPs when possible, or run server only on 127.0.0.1 and firewall the server when listening to non-localhost. – akostadinov Feb 14 '17 at 10:27
106

This will be helpful for some people:

From MySQL command line:

CREATE USER 'newuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

Sadly, at this point newuser has no permissions to do anything with the databases. In fact, if newuser even tries to login (with the password, password), they will not be able to reach the MySQL shell.

Therefore, the first thing to do is to provide the user with access to the information they will need.

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON * . * TO 'newuser'@'localhost';

The asterisks in this command refer to the database and table (respectively) that they can access—this specific command allows to the user to read, edit, execute and perform all tasks across all the databases and tables.

Once you have finalized the permissions that you want to set up for your new users, always be sure to reload all the privileges.

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Your changes will now be in effect.

For more information: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/grant.html

If you are not comfortable with the command line then you can use a client like MySQL workbench, Navicat or SQLyog

  • 4
    flush privileges is not needed when you use grant commands. x4 – Pacerier Jan 14 '15 at 10:39
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    Stop using FLUSH PRIVILEGES – CIRCLE Oct 24 '15 at 23:23
  • Either you wholesale copied from Linode, or they copied from you: linode.com/docs/databases/mysql/… – user562566 Apr 26 '16 at 18:34
  • I needed to identify again with GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON * . * TO 'newuser'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'my_password' WITH GRANT OPTION; (strange... , but true) – rubo77 Oct 22 '18 at 16:03
28

 1. Create the database

CREATE DATABASE db_name;

 2. Create the username for the database db_name

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON db_name.* TO 'username'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

 3. Use the database

USE db_name;

 4. Finally you are in database db_name and then execute the commands like create , select and insert operations.

  • Today this gave me the warning "Using GRANT statement to modify existing user's properties other than privileges is deprecated and will be removed in future release. Use ALTER USER statement for this operation." So should I understand that I should create a user, then grant privileges, now? – felwithe Mar 2 '18 at 1:20
20

This SQL grants on all databases but just basic privileges. They're enough for Drupal or Wordpress and as a nicety, allows one developer account for local projects.

GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, CREATE, DROP, 
    INDEX, ALTER, CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES 
ON *.* TO 'username'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';
13
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON mydb.* TO myuser@localhost IDENTIFIED BY 'mypasswd';

Works for privileges on schema :)

Optional: after mypasswd you can add WITH GRANT OPTION

12

Hello I used this code to have the super user in mysql

GRANT EXECUTE, PROCESS, SELECT, SHOW DATABASES, SHOW VIEW, ALTER, ALTER ROUTINE,
    CREATE, CREATE ROUTINE, CREATE TEMPORARY TABLES, CREATE VIEW, DELETE, DROP,
    EVENT, INDEX, INSERT, REFERENCES, TRIGGER, UPDATE, CREATE USER, FILE,
    LOCK TABLES, RELOAD, REPLICATION CLIENT, REPLICATION SLAVE, SHUTDOWN,
    SUPER
        ON *.* TO mysql@'%'
    WITH GRANT OPTION;

and then

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
  • 11
    flush privileges is not needed when you use grant commands. x4 – Pacerier Jan 14 '15 at 10:39
  • 4
    Stop using FLUSH PRIVILEGES – CIRCLE Oct 24 '15 at 23:23
  • Note: The exact list in the GRANT varies between Versions of MySQL. – Rick James Nov 3 '15 at 20:41
12

I could able to make it work only by adding GRANT OPTION, without that always receive permission denied error

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON mydb.* TO 'myuser'@'localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION;
5

To access from remote server to mydb database only

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON mydb.* TO 'root'@'192.168.2.21';

To access from remote server to all databases.

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON * . * TO 'root'@'192.168.2.21';
0

To grant all priveleges on the database: mydb to the user: myuser, just execute:

GRANT ALL ON mydb.* TO 'myuser'@'localhost';

or:

GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON mydb.* TO 'myuser'@'localhost';

The PRIVILEGES keyword is not necessary.

Also I do not know why the other answers suggest that the IDENTIFIED BY 'password' be put on the end of the command. I believe that it is not required.

protected by Machavity Jun 1 '16 at 20:28

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