45

Tried

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'root' WITH GRANT OPTION;

Getting

ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'IDENTIFIED BY 'root' WITH GRANT OPTION' at line 1.

Note: The same is working when tried in previous versions.

Also tried

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

Getting

ERROR 1410 (42000): You are not allowed to create a user with GRANT

MySQL (8.0.11.0) username/password is root/root.

  • are you connecting directly with mysql or do you use ssh? – Harald May 4 '18 at 14:29
  • directly from command prompt as root user – Praveen May 4 '18 at 15:03
  • See the differences between 13.7.1.6 GRANT Syntax and 13.7.1.4 GRANT Syntax. – wchiquito May 4 '18 at 15:18
  • 1
    im too stuck with the same issue. I am launching the mysql shell using mysql -u root -p, then entering root password. Then I tried GRANT GRANT OPTION ON *.* TO 'root'@'%'; and I get the error ERROR 1410 (42000): You are not allowed to create a user with GRANT – aiman May 5 '18 at 8:42

11 Answers 11

97

Starting with MySQL 8 you no longer can (implicitly) create a user using the GRANT command. Use CREATE USER instead, followed by the GRANT statement:

mysql> CREATE USER 'root'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'root';
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

Caution about the security risks about WITH GRANT OPTION, see:

  • 1
    This command will create a new user. But I want to grant privileges to existing root user. mysql> CREATE USER 'root'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'root'; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.31 sec) mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON . TO 'root'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION; Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.16 sec) mysql> SELECT User FROM mysql.user; +------------------+ | User | +------------------+ | root | | mysql.infoschema | | mysql.session | | mysql.sys | | root | +------------------+ 5 rows in set (0.00 sec) – Praveen May 7 '18 at 4:34
  • Now two users with name root are present in user table!! Also I am not able to connect remotely (root user). ------------- Details: Type: com.mysql.jdbc.exceptions.jdbc4.MySQLNonTransientConnectionException SQL State: 08001 – Praveen May 7 '18 at 4:39
  • Weird. The error message in your question indicates this user doesn't exist. This is the only reason why I suggested to create it first. And it's impossible to have the same user twice in single MySQL instance. They differ either in the name or in the host part. – Mike Lischke May 7 '18 at 6:39
  • 1
    These 2 users connect from different hosts. Run SELECT User, Host FROM mysql.user; instead. – Mike Lischke May 7 '18 at 6:46
  • U are right host is different for both root users. mysql> SELECT User, Host FROM mysql.user; +------------------+-----------+ | User | Host | +------------------+-----------+ | root | % | | mysql.infoschema | localhost | | mysql.session | localhost | | mysql.sys | localhost | | root | localhost | +------------------+-----------+ 5 rows in set (0.00 sec) The problem is why I am not ablr to connect remotely. Details: Type: com.mysql.jdbc.exceptions.jdbc4.MySQLNonTransientConnectionException SQL State: 08001 – Praveen May 8 '18 at 4:44
13

1) This worked for me. First, create a new user. Example: as 'foo' with pw 'bar.enter code here

> mysql> CREATE USER 'foo'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH mysql_native_password BY 'bar';

2) Replace the below code with a username with 'foo'.

> mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON database_name.* TO'foo'@'localhost';

Note: database_name is the database that you want to have privileges, . means all on all

3) Login as user foo

mysql> mysql -u foo -p

Password: bar

4) Make sure your initial connection from Sequelize is set to foo with pw bar.

  • 2
    This does by far not answer the question. It's about global permissions, and not database specific permissions. – tmuecksch Nov 1 '18 at 14:46
2

The specified user just doesn't exist on your MySQL (so, MySQL is trying to create it with GRANT as it did before version 8, but fails with the limitations, introduced in this version).

MySQL's pretty dumb at this point, so if you have 'root'@'localhost' and trying to grant privileges to 'root'@'%' it treats them as different users, rather than generalized notion for root user on any host, including localhost.

The error message is also misleading.

So, if you're getting the error message, check your existing users with something like this

SELECT CONCAT("'", user, "'@'", host, "'") FROM mysql.user;

and then create missing user (as Mike advised) or adjust your GRANT command to the actual exisiting user specificaion.

  • This was a valid solution for me! I simply had failed to type the user@ line precisely. Be sure to check this before trying the other solutions suggested. For me it was: CREATE USER 'user'@'%domain.com' and then when I issued the failing GRANT statement, my syntax was off by one '.'. It looked like this GRANT .... TO 'user'@'%.domain.com'. I forgot to put the '.' in my create statement and it made all the difference in fixing this issue. – wallisds 2 days ago
1

My Specs:

mysql --version
mysql  Ver 8.0.16 for Linux on x86_64 (MySQL Community Server - GPL)

What worked for me:

mysql> CREATE USER 'username'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'desired_password';
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON db_name.* TO 'username'@'localhost' WITH GRANT OPTION;

Response in both queries:

Query OK, O rows affected (0.10 sec*)

N.B: I created a database (db_name) earlier and was creating a user credential with all privileges granted to all tables in the DB in place of using the default root user which I read somewhere is a best practice.

0

This worked for me:

mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES 
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'%'WITH GRANT OPTION;
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES
0

Check out your username and domain is the same as created before. Mysql select account by the two colums in user table.If it is different, mysql may think you want to create a new account by grant,which is not supported after 8.0 version.

0

Just my 2 cents on the subject. I was having the exact same issue with trying to connect from MySQL Workbench. I'm running a bitnami-mysql virtual machine to set up a local sandbox for development.

Bitnami's tutorial said to run the 'Grant All Privileges' command:

/opt/bitnami/mysql/bin/mysql -u root -p -e "grant all privileges on *.* to 'root'@'%' identified by 'PASSWORD' with grant option";

This was clearly not working, I finally got it to work using Mike Lischke's answer.

What I think happened was that the root@% user had the wrong credentials associated to it. So if you've tried to modify the user's privileges and with no luck try:

  1. Dropping the user.
  2. Create the user again.
  3. Make sure you have the correct binding on your my.cnf config file. In my case I've commented the line out since it's just for a sandbox environment.

From Mysql Console:

List Users (helpful to see all your users):

select user, host from mysql.user;

Drop Desired User:

drop user '{{ username }}'@'%';

Create User and Grant Permissions:

CREATE USER '{{ username }}'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY '{{ password }}';
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO '{{ username }}'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;

Run this command:

FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Locate your mysql config file 'my.cnf' and look for a line that looks like this:

bind-address=127.0.0.1

and comment it using a '#':

#bind-address=127.0.0.1

Then restart your mysql service.

Hope this helps someone having the same issue!

-1

Well, I just had the same problem. Even if route had '%' could not connect remotely. Now, having a look at my.ini file (config file in windows) the bind-address statement was missed.

So... I putted this bind-address = * after [mysqld] and restarted the service. Now it works!

-1

This may work

grant all on dbtest.* to 'dbuser'@'%' identified by 'mysql_password';

-3

I heard the same problem on centOS and this worked for me (version: 8.0.11)

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON . TO 'root'@'%'

  • ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '. TO 'root'@'%'' at line 1 – GDefender Aug 25 '18 at 14:05
  • mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON . TO 'root'@'%'; ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '. TO 'root'@'%'' at line 1 mysql> – PGOEL Oct 30 '18 at 10:00
-3

This worked for me

mysql> CREATE USER 'root'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'password';

mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'root'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;
  • 1
    Does not work for MySQL 8. Have you even tried this?! – tmuecksch Nov 1 '18 at 14:47
  • 3
    You obviously did not try this with MySQL 8, I suggest you read the question before you answer. – diek Dec 13 '18 at 19:11

protected by mu 無 Jul 29 at 16:17

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