1

So I've gone through a whole bunch of circles, detecting where they overlap like this, and now I've plotted the circles that overlap.

But in the corner, as I've shown with the arrow, I have two red circles overlapping one blue, but there should only be one overlap detected. The second circle overlapping should be disregarded, based on distance.

How can I remove the extra overlap, so that one red will always overlap one blue, but also the other way around?

enter image description here

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt    

# Format is (x1, y1, r1), x2, y2, r2), squared_distance)
circles = (((87, 319, 10), (82, 316, 10), 34),
           ((162, 230, 10), (157, 226, 10), 41),
           ((162, 438, 10), (162, 440, 10), 4),
           ((235, 146, 10), (230, 150, 10), 41),
           ((260, 183, 10), (260, 185, 10), 4),
           ((260, 265, 10), (253, 269, 10), 65),
           ((360, 88, 10), (366, 91, 10), 45),
           ((428, 442, 10), (433, 447, 10), 50), # Two red overlap the same blue
           ((438, 453, 10), (433, 447, 10), 61), # So this one (furthest away) must go
           ((459, 24, 10), (465, 21, 10), 45))

fig, ax = plt.subplots(figsize = (6,6))

ax.set_xlim(0,500)
ax.set_ylim(0,500)

for red, blue, squared_dist in circles:
    x1, y1, r1 = red
    x2, y2, r2 = blue

    c = plt.Circle((x1, y1), r1, color = "red", linewidth = 2, fill = False, alpha = 1)
    ax.add_patch(c)

    c = plt.Circle((x2, y2), r2, color = "blue", linewidth = 2, fill = False, alpha = 1)
    ax.add_patch(c)

ax.arrow(390, 400, 20, 20, head_width=10, head_length=10, fc='k', ec='k')
plt.show()
0

Okay, so I solved the problem using Pandas. Turns out that a nested list like the above is actually very easy to work with as a container.

Taking the original circles and making them to a dataframe:

df = pd.DataFrame(circles, columns = ["red", "blue", "dist"])

Gives

              red            blue  dist
0   (87, 319, 10)   (82, 316, 10)    34
1  (162, 230, 10)  (157, 226, 10)    41
2  (162, 438, 10)  (162, 440, 10)     4
3  (235, 146, 10)  (230, 150, 10)    41
4  (260, 183, 10)  (260, 185, 10)     4
5  (260, 265, 10)  (253, 269, 10)    65
6   (360, 88, 10)   (366, 91, 10)    45
7  (428, 442, 10)  (433, 447, 10)    50 
8  (438, 453, 10)  (433, 447, 10)    61 
9   (459, 24, 10)   (465, 21, 10)    45 

And then, simply dropping duplicates will work, if sorted by distance.

df = df.sort_values("dist").drop_duplicates("red").drop_duplicates("blue").reset_index(drop = True)

Yielding

              red            blue  dist
0   (87, 319, 10)   (82, 316, 10)    34
1  (162, 230, 10)  (157, 226, 10)    41
2  (162, 438, 10)  (162, 440, 10)     4
3  (235, 146, 10)  (230, 150, 10)    41
4  (260, 183, 10)  (260, 185, 10)     4
5  (260, 265, 10)  (253, 269, 10)    65
6   (360, 88, 10)   (366, 91, 10)    45
7  (428, 442, 10)  (433, 447, 10)    50
9   (459, 24, 10)   (465, 21, 10)    45

And row 8 is removed.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.