4

I have found many posts where it was pretty clearly stated that a derived class function cannot be assigned to a base class function pointer. So I wish to know, how to approach and solve the following situation:

Suppose I have the following base class

class base {
protected:
    typedef void (base::*base_fp)();
    typedef std::map<std::string, base_fp> array;

    array associativeArray;    
};

The main purpose of this class is to have a property of associative-array of functions.

So what I wanted was for every derived child to be able to add their methods to the "associativeArray"

this->associativeArray["Method"] = &child::method; // from the child class

My original intention for using this was to call different methods depending on requirement without using conditional statements. It would have been in a try-catch block to handle the case for a non-existent index. Since my original approach is not possible, so what will be the right way of doing this?

EDIT: A use-case example

Suppose the associative array is an array of "algorithm" functions. Then for user "algorithm" input, I should be able to call the corresponding method defined in the child class

(this->*associativeArray.at("algorithm"))();
  • When calling one of these, how would you know which derived type to cast the function pointer to, should you be able to mix both base and derived member function pointers in the same map? I mean you have to know the exact type of the object the member function belongs to when you call it don't you? – Galik May 6 '18 at 1:30
  • @Galik What did you mean by "which derived type"? The functions will be added in the constructers of the child. And yes, the same array should be able to hold both member and child methods – Daolagajao May 6 '18 at 1:33
  • But when you call these functions, don't you need to know the exact type the function pointer belongs to? You have to have a pointer to an object of that type to call them with as well. – Galik May 6 '18 at 1:35
  • 2
    Suppose you've managed to populate associativeArray the way you want. How do you plan to use it? Show an example of the expected usage. – Igor Tandetnik May 6 '18 at 1:36
  • 1
    I think you have some fundamental misunderstanding of how class inheritance and class method pointers work. Using base_fp you can only call a method in the base class. It cannot call a method in any derived class. That's it. Nothing else. Associative arrays are not a factor in any of this. – Sam Varshavchik May 6 '18 at 1:50
3

The closest I can get to what you want is using std::function (available since C++11). First, we'll change your typedefs, both for modernization purposes and to use std::function:

class base {
protected:
    using base_fp = std::function<void ()>;
    using fn_array = std::map<std::string, base_fp>;
    fn_array fns;

public:
    void call_fn(std::string const &fn_name) {
        auto it = fns.find(fn_name);
        if(it != fns.end()) {
            it->second();
        }
        else {
            // error case
        }
    }
};

Because fn_array stores std::functions, it'll work with anything we can treat as a callable. This can't work directly with member functions (std::invoke may do the trick, but I haven't used that library feature), but you can use trivial closures to get similar behavior.

class derived : public base {
public:
    derived() {
        fns["foo"] = [this]() { foo(); };
    }

private:
    void foo() {
        std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << '\n';
    }
};

You can leverage this using code like the following:

int main() {
    derived d;
    d.call_fn("foo");
    return 0;
}
  • If you want type-safety, you'd need to use a different type in your map value` (e.g., std::map<std::string, std::function<void (int, char, SomeCustomType)>>). If you need to support multiple signatures in your map, you'd have to use some sort of type-safe wrapper (e.g., std::variant if you're in C++17). This is the same issue if you're using raw function pointers as in your original question. – Stephen Newell May 6 '18 at 2:45
0

I guess what do you need is static_cast because it is safe to use between two functions bearing same signatures, even being engendered from the same class hierarchy.

class base {

   protected:
     typedef void (base::*fn)() ;
     base(){
     fn_arr["foo"]=&base::foo;  
     }  
     void foo()  {
        cout << "i'm foo" << endl;
     }

   public:
     map<std::string, fn> fn_arr;
};

class derived : public base {

   protected:
      void bar() {
          cout <<"i'm bar" << endl;
      }

   public:
      derived() {
          fn_arr["bar"]=static_cast<fn>(&derived::bar);  
      }
};

see this demo

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