If I have a list that contains certain sentences and words, like:

res = ['Today is a great day', 'lunch @myplace', 'make sure to check this link: https://']

and I want to delete only the words that start with '@' or words that contain 'https', and not the whole sentence that contains that certain word, how do I go about doing that? Right now, I have the following:

words_filtered = [e.lower() for e in res]  
words_cleaned = [word for word in words_filtered if 'http' not in word and not word.startswith('@')]  

when printing words_cleaned, the words have indeed been deleted from the list but so has the whole sentence. It returns ['today is a great day'] But I want it to return ['today is a great day', 'lunch', 'make sure to check this link:']

  • That's because words_filtered should actually be named sentences_filtered, so that later on you'll see that [... for word in words_filtered ...] isn't what you want because it does [for sentence in sentences_filtered], but you want to split each sentence into individual words. – ForceBru May 6 at 11:50
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Praise the power of comprehensions here:

res = ['Today is a great day', 'lunch @myplace', 'make sure to check this link: https://']

words_cleaned = [" ".join([
                    words for words in sentence.split()
                    if 'https:' not in words and not words.startswith('@')])
                    for sentence in res]

print(words_cleaned)

This yields

['Today is a great day', 'lunch', 'make sure to check this link:']


Or, as @jpp points out, use

words_cleaned = [" ".join([
                    words for words in sentence.split()
                    if not ('https' in words or words.startswith('@'))])
                    for sentence in res]
  • 1
    Or, equivalently, not ('https' in words or words.startswith('@')) – jpp May 6 at 11:54
  • Also, you don't really need a list comprehension as an argument to " ".join: you can use a generator, which is faster and more readable. – ForceBru May 6 at 11:54
  • @ForceBru, That's not true. str.join works faster with a list. It's one of the few instances where this is the case. – jpp May 6 at 11:55
  • Check out stackoverflow.com/a/37782238/9209546 – jpp May 6 at 12:01
  • 2
    @ForceBru: str.join() needs to iterate over a generator twice (generating a list), that's why it's faster to use a list in the first place. – Jan May 6 at 12:02

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