58

When using the rm command to delete files in Powershell, they are permanently deleted.

Instead of this, I would like to have the deleted item go to the recycle bin, like what happens when files are deleted through the UI.

How can you do this in PowerShell?

1
  • 3
    Once you've picked a solution below, you can update the rm alias to use it via Set-Alias rm Remove-ItemSafely -Option AllScope
    – bdukes
    Jul 31, 2015 at 15:46

8 Answers 8

42

2017 answer: use the Recycle module by Brian Dukes

Install-Module -Name Recycle

Then run:

Remove-ItemSafely file

I like to make an alias called trash for this.

11
  • What if there are multiple files?
    – Kahn Kah
    Mar 21, 2017 at 12:20
  • 1
    @KahnKah Use .\* instead of file but this will delete all subdirectories too May 2, 2017 at 15:42
  • @Neonit yes that's the same with all third party software. Feb 10, 2022 at 8:56
  • @mikemaccana Yes, but this command looks very much like there is no third party involved and comes from Microsoft instead as there is no URL or anything given that would suggest it's from a public repo.
    – Neonit
    Feb 10, 2022 at 12:46
  • How is this better than the VB solution? That doesn't require installing 3rd party modules. Dec 14, 2022 at 4:11
36

If you don't want to always see the confirmation prompt, use the following:

Add-Type -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic
[Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::DeleteFile('d:\foo.txt','OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')

(solution courtesy of Shay Levy)

1
  • 5
    +1 for avoiding the prompt! Btw, keep mind that there is also DeleteDirectory
    – marsze
    Oct 27, 2014 at 7:10
21

It works in PowerShell pretty much the same way as Chris Ballance's solution in JScript:

 $shell = new-object -comobject "Shell.Application"
 $folder = $shell.Namespace("<path to file>")
 $item = $folder.ParseName("<name of file>")
 $item.InvokeVerb("delete")
2
  • There is a small bug in your answer (but it did work!). You need a quote before "path to file" $folder = $shell.Namespace(<path to file>") becomes $folder = $shell.Namespace("<path to file>") Feb 2, 2009 at 16:06
  • 1
    quotes only needed if you have blank space in paths Dec 5, 2013 at 9:49
19

Here is a shorter version that reduces a bit of work

$path = "<path to file>"
$shell = new-object -comobject "Shell.Application"
$item = $shell.Namespace(0).ParseName("$path")
$item.InvokeVerb("delete")
1
  • 2
    This asks with confirmation window. Dec 19, 2018 at 16:19
11

Here's an improved function that supports directories as well as files as input:

Add-Type -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic

function Remove-Item-ToRecycleBin($Path) {
    $item = Get-Item -Path $Path -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
    if ($item -eq $null)
    {
        Write-Error("'{0}' not found" -f $Path)
    }
    else
    {
        $fullpath=$item.FullName
        Write-Verbose ("Moving '{0}' to the Recycle Bin" -f $fullpath)
        if (Test-Path -Path $fullpath -PathType Container)
        {
            [Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::DeleteDirectory($fullpath,'OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')
        }
        else
        {
            [Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::DeleteFile($fullpath,'OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')
        }
    }
}
6

Remove file to RecycleBin:

Add-Type -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic
[Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::DeleteFile('e:\test\test.txt','OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')

Remove folder to RecycleBin:

Add-Type -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic
[Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::Deletedirectory('e:\test\testfolder','OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')
1

Here's slight mod to sba923s' great answer.

I've changed a few things like the parameter passing and added a -WhatIf to test the deletion for the file or directory.

function Remove-ItemToRecycleBin {

  Param
  (
    [Parameter(Mandatory = $true, HelpMessage = 'Directory path of file path for deletion.')]
    [String]$LiteralPath,
    [Parameter(Mandatory = $false, HelpMessage = 'Switch for allowing the user to test the deletion first.')]
    [Switch]$WhatIf
    )

  Add-Type -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic
  $item = Get-Item -LiteralPath $LiteralPath -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue

  if ($item -eq $null) {
    Write-Error("'{0}' not found" -f $LiteralPath)
  }
  else {
    $fullpath = $item.FullName

    if (Test-Path -LiteralPath $fullpath -PathType Container) {
      if (!$WhatIf) {
        Write-Verbose ("Moving '{0}' folder to the Recycle Bin" -f $fullpath)
        [Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::DeleteDirectory($fullpath,'OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')
      }
      else {
        Write-Host "Testing deletion of folder: $fullpath"
      }
    }
    else {
      if (!$WhatIf) {
        Write-Verbose ("Moving '{0}' file to the Recycle Bin" -f $fullpath)
        [Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::DeleteFile($fullpath,'OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')
      }
      else {
        Write-Host "Testing deletion of file: $fullpath"
      }
    }
  }

}

$tempFile = [Environment]::GetFolderPath("Desktop") + "\deletion test.txt"
"stuff" | Out-File -FilePath $tempFile

$fileToDelete = $tempFile

Start-Sleep -Seconds 2 # Just here for you to see the file getting created before deletion.

# Tests the deletion of the folder or directory.
Remove-ItemToRecycleBin -WhatIf -LiteralPath $fileToDelete
# PS> Testing deletion of file: C:\Users\username\Desktop\deletion test.txt

# Actually deletes the file or directory.
# Remove-ItemToRecycleBin -LiteralPath $fileToDelete

0

Here is a complete solution that can be added to your user profile to make 'rm' send files to the Recycle Bin. In my limited testing, it handles relative paths better than the previous solutions.

Add-Type -AssemblyName Microsoft.VisualBasic

function Remove-Item-toRecycle($item) {
    Get-Item -Path $item | %{ $fullpath = $_.FullName}
    [Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.FileSystem]::DeleteFile($fullpath,'OnlyErrorDialogs','SendToRecycleBin')
}

Set-Alias rm Remove-Item-toRecycle -Option AllScope

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.