48

When I try to compile

main = putStrLn $ show x where
    2 + x = 7

GHC complains

error: Variable not in scope: x
  |
1 | main = putStrLn $ show x
  |                        ^

So it seems that 2 + x = 7 is by itself syntactically valid, although it doesn't actually define x. But why is it so?

  • 4
    Haskell often reports first fatal error, only. Put a digit where the first out-of-scope x is to see additional errors, that is, x out of scope – fp_mora May 6 '18 at 20:32
  • 10
    It gets better. For example, let 1+1 = 3 in 1+1. – Alec May 7 '18 at 0:01
  • 2
    @Alec Indeed! Even better, let 1+1=3 in 1+1 evaluates to 3 (not 2), while let 2=3 in 2 evaluates to 2 (not 3). And, in ancient Haskell, let x+2=7 in x used to evaluate to 5, unlike let 2+x=7 in x (fortunately, this is no longer the case.) – chi May 7 '18 at 12:27
  • @chi I thought n+k patterns needed brackets, or is that not the case? – Potato44 May 8 '18 at 6:13
  • 1
    @chi They still exist in GHC, you just need to turn on -XNPlusKPatterns. – Potato44 May 8 '18 at 20:55
69

It is valid because it defines + instead.

main = print (3 + 4)
   where -- silly redefinition of `+` follows
   0 + y = y
   x + y = x * ((x-1) + y)

Above, the Prelude (+) function is shadowed by a local binding. The result will be 24, not 7, consequently.

Turning on warnings should point out the dangerous shadowing.

<interactive>:11:6: warning: [-Wname-shadowing]
    This binding for ‘+’ shadows the existing binding
37

You're defining a local function called +.

2 + x = 7 is equivalent to (+) 2 x = 7, which is equivalent to

(+) y x | y == 2 = 7

x is an (unused) parameter, and the function is only defined if the first argument is 2. That's not very useful, but it explains why x is not visible outside.

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