From the documentation

duckmap will apply &block on each element and return a new list with defined return values of the block. For undefined return values, duckmap will try to descend into the element if that element implements Iterable.

But then:

my $list = [[1,2,3],[[4,5],6,7]];

say $list.deepmap( *² );
say $list.duckmap( *² ); # returns [9 9]
say $list.duckmap( -> $_ { $_² } ); # returns [9 9]

deepmap behaves pretty much as expected, but I can't really make any sense of what duckmap is doing. This question is related to this issue in perl6/doc. It can be solved with "They couldn't be more different", but I would like to find some examples where they do the same, and when they don't, try and understand really what's going on.

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The duck in duckmap refers to duck-typing; that is “if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck, it must be a duck.”

> say [1,2.2,"3.4",4,"a"].duckmap(-> Str $_ { use fatal; .Int }).perl
[1, 2.2, 3, 4, "a"]

(use fatal is there so that the "a".Int failure object becomes a thrown exception, so that duckmap catches it and returns the original data instead)

This is useful for changing small portions of the input without having to specially deal with every possible input.

> say [1,2.2,"3.4",4,"a"].map(-> $_ { $_ ~~ Str ?? .Int // .self !! .self }).perl
[1, 2.2, 3, 4, "a"]
> say [1,2.2,"3.4",4,"a"].deepmap(-> $_ { $_ ~~ Str ?? .Int // .self !! .self }).perl
[1, 2.2, 3, 4, "a"]

There are more differences between duckmap and the other maps, but they all are there for this basic premise.


> [ [<a b c>], [1,2,3], [[4,5,6],] ].duckmap(-> @_ where .all ~~ Int { @_.Str } ).perl
[["a", "b", "c"], "1 2 3", ["4 5 6"]]

> [ [<a b c>], [1,2,3], [[4,5,6],] ].map(-> @_ { @_.all ~~ Int ?? @_.Str !! @_.self } ).Array.perl
[["a", "b", "c"], "1 2 3", [[4, 5, 6],]] # doesn't match, as map is one level deep

(Note that you can't do the above at all with deepmap, as it goes too deep)
In order to get the same behaviour out of map, would require potentially much more work.

duckmap goes deep only if &block can not be called on Array. $_ can be Array in -> $_ { $_² }.

Try

say $list.duckmap( -> Int $_ {$_²} ); #returns [[1 4 9] [[16 25] 36 49]]

There, duckmap goes deep.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.