I am using the below code

var processed = new List<Guid>();
Parallel.ForEach(items, item => 
{
    processed.Add(SomeProcessingFunc(item));
});

Is the above code thread safe? Is there a chance of processed list getting corrupted? Or should i use a lock before adding?

var processed = new List<Guid>();
Parallel.ForEach(items, item => 
{
    lock(items.SyncRoot)
        processed.Add(SomeProcessingFunc(item));
});

thanks.

  • Did you look at MSDN? Here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 16 '11 at 18:25
  • 1
    See stackoverflow.com/questions/4779165/…. – mellamokb Feb 16 '11 at 18:26
  • @Martinho: Yes. I read that List<T> is not thread safe. But I am unable to understand that even if multiple threads are adding to the list how can that corrupt the list. – stackoverflowuser Feb 16 '11 at 18:41
  • 2
    @stackoverflowuser: an example: the list keeps track of how many elements it has. When you add one, it places it in the next position, and increment the count. Well, there's a race condition right there: two threads could both add an element, and count increase only by one (and one element getting lost in the process). – R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 16 '11 at 18:45
  • @mellmokb: thanks for the link. It was helpful. – stackoverflowuser Feb 16 '11 at 18:47
up vote 25 down vote accepted

No! It is not safe at all, because processed.Add is not. You can do following:

items.AsParallel().Select(item => SomeProcessingFunc(item)).ToList();

Keep in mind that Parallel.ForEach was created mostly for imperative operations for each element of sequence. What you do is map: project each value of sequence. That is what Select was created for. AsParallel scales it across threads in most efficient manner.

This code works correctly:

var processed = new List<Guid>();
Parallel.ForEach(items, item => 
{
    lock(items.SyncRoot)
        processed.Add(SomeProcessingFunc(item));
});

but makes no sense in terms of multithreading. locking at each iteration forces totally sequential execution, bunch of threads will be waiting for single thread.

  • to be complete why: See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6sh2ey19.aspx near the end it has an topic on Thread Safety – rene Feb 16 '11 at 18:28
  • @rene: tack #c9721fa0-1cd9-4a21-818c-98d164c9fc14 to the end of that address and it points directly to the relevant section ;) – R. Martinho Fernandes Feb 16 '11 at 18:31
  • Thanks for the reply. Would it be better to use ConcurrentBag<T> as mentioned here stackoverflow.com/questions/4779165/… – stackoverflowuser Feb 16 '11 at 18:47
  • Can you pls. provide your inputs as to whether AsParallel would be better than using ConcurrentBag<T> ? – stackoverflowuser Feb 16 '11 at 19:12
  • 1
    @stackoverflowuser yes, when you really need concurrent access to data structure you should use ConcurrentBag<T>. but in reality with such high level library as PLINQ it is rarely needed. – Andrey Feb 16 '11 at 19:12

Use:

var processed = new ConcurrentBag<Guid>();

See parallel foreach loop - odd behavior.

  • ConcurrentBag<Guid>(); – Andrey Feb 16 '11 at 19:14
  • Thanks. Updated. – mellamokb Feb 16 '11 at 21:30

To quote from Jon Skeet before he gets here:

As part of Parellel Extensions in .Net 4, there are several new collections in a new System.Collections.Concurrent namespace. These are designed to be safe in the face of concurrent operations from multiple threads, with relatively little locking.

These include IProducerConsumerCollection<T>, BlockingCollection<T>, ConcurrentBag<T>, ConcurrentQueue<T>, ConcurrentStack<T>, and ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, TValue> among others.

  • Agreed. See my answer, which uses a type from the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace. – mellamokb Feb 16 '11 at 18:28

As alternative to the answer of Andrey:

items.AsParallel().Select(item => SomeProcessingFunc(item)).ToList();

You could also write

items.AsParallel().ForAll(item => SomeProcessingFunc(item));

This makes the query that is behind it even more efficient because no merge is required, MSDN. Make sure the SomeProcessingFunc function is thread-safe. And I think, but didn't test it, that you still need a lock if the list can be modified in an other thread (adding or removing) elements.

Using ConcurrentBag of type Something

var bag = new ConcurrentBag<List<Something>>;
var items = GetAllItemsINeed();
Parallel.For(items,i =>                          
   {
      bag.Add(i.DoSomethingInEachI());
   });

reading is thread safe, but adding is not. You need a reader/writer lock setup as adding may cause the internal array to resize which would mess up a concurrent read.

If you can guarantee the array won't resize on add, you may be safe to add while reading, but don't quote me on that.

But really, a list is just an interface to an array.

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