55

I am using Mustache and using the data

{ "names": [ {"name":"John"}, {"name":"Mary"} ] }

My mustache template is:

{{#names}}
    {{name}}
{{/names}}

What I want to be able to do is to get an index of the current number in the array. Something like:

{{#names}}
    {{name}} is {{index}}
{{/names}}

and have it print out

John is 1
Mary is 2

Is it possible to get this with Mustache? or with Handlebars or another extension?

  • Runs in O(n) time... Mustache.render('{{#list}}{{index}}{{/list}}', { list: ['a', 'b', 'c' ], index: () => (++this.i || (this.i = 0)) }); – tfmontague Nov 29 '18 at 3:45

13 Answers 13

31

For reference, this functionality is now built in to Handlebars which has compatibility with Mustache.

Use {{@index}}

{{#names}}
    {{name}} is {{@index}}
{{/names}}

John is 0

Mary is 1

  • 22
    Handlebars being compatible with mustache is a common misconception. Handlebars IS NOT compatible with mustache at all. They are not interchangeable at all. Just wanted to clarify that because I got caught trying to use one for the other. – derickito Nov 27 '13 at 20:48
  • 5
    Is there any mean to do it with only mustache ? – baraber Jun 25 '15 at 18:39
  • 1
    Handlebars IS NOT compatible with mustache at all. Even though they say this on their website it is completely false. – derickito Nov 16 '16 at 16:25
  • 4
    This should not be the accepted answer as it does not answer the question in the title. – Luke Skywalker Mar 24 '18 at 15:52
  • 1
    This is an awful answer. Moustache is not platform specific while Handlebars is. – dajek Jul 3 '18 at 15:34
48

This is how I do it in JavaScript:

var idx = 0;

var data = { 
   "names": [ 
       {"name":"John"}, 
       {"name":"Mary"} 
    ],
    "idx": function() {
        return idx++;
    }
};

var html = Mustache.render(template, data);

Your template:

{{#names}}
    {{name}} is {{idx}}
{{/names}}
  • 10
    The one issue with this is you have to remember to only ever get the idx once, otherwise it will change for the current object. In some of our templates, we use the index in more than one location for the current object. – christophercotton Sep 7 '12 at 15:31
  • great answer and I added a solution for multiple {{idx}} – Roman Feb 25 '13 at 10:46
  • The solution for multiple {{index}} can be found on Index of an array element in Mustache.js @oyatek – Alexar Oct 30 '13 at 20:57
  • I use in my template view a function that returns the index using indexOf, check my answer for more details. – Pierre Oct 26 '14 at 15:44
13

In handlebars.js you can accomplish this with a helper function. (In fact, one of the advantages mentioned about handlebars here http://yehudakatz.com/2010/09/09/announcing-handlebars-js/ is that you can use helpers instead of having to rewrite the objects before calling the template.

So, you could do this:

  var nameIndex = 0;
  Handlebars.registerHelper('name_with_index', function() {
    nameIndex++;
    return this.name + " is " + nameIndex;
  })

And, then your template can be this:

{{#names}}
<li>{{name_with_index}}</li>
{{/names}}

Your data is the same as before, i.e.:

{ "names": [ {"name":"John"}, {"name":"Mary"} ] };

And you get this output:

<li>John is 1</li>
<li>Mary is 2</li>

To make this really work, nameIndex needs to get reset each time the template is rendered, so to do that you can have a reset helper at the beginning of the list. So full code looks like this:

  var data = { "names": [ {"name":"John"}, {"name":"Mary"} ] };
  var templateSource = "<ul>{{reset_index}}{{#names}}<li>{{name_with_index}}</li>{{/names}}</ul>";
  var template = Handlebars.compile(templateSource);

  var helpers = function() {
    var nameIndex = 0;
    Handlebars.registerHelper('name_with_index', function() {
      nameIndex++;
      return this.name + " is " + nameIndex;
    });
    Handlebars.registerHelper('reset_index', function() {
      nameIndex = 0;
    })
  }();

  var htmlResult= template(data);
  $('#target').html(htmlResult);

  var htmlResult2= template(data);
  $('#target2').html(htmlResult2);

(This can correctly render the template twice.)

  • That could work, though it has the problem that you cannot use the index in more than one place during the item. Since each time you retrieve the index you increment it. This doesn't work well for template designers and will cause bugs and problems. Also, having the "reset_index" adds in a logic method to reset the index, which I believe goes again the logicless templates. I have seen in the Android version they have available {{-index}} which does the correct thing. – christophercotton Apr 4 '11 at 18:50
7

You can run the following loop on your list of objects.

This solution has the following advantages:

  • Does not change the model data
  • The index can be accessed multiple times

Code:

for( var i=0; i< the_list.length; i++) {
    the_list[i].idx = (function(in_i){return in_i+1;})(i);
}

Explanation:

A function is used instead of a variable name, so the data is not mutated. Closure is used to return the value of 'i' at the time the function is created in the loop instead of the value of i at the end of the loop.

6

A better approach for Mustache would be using a function that gets the index using indexOf:

var data = { 
   names: [ {"name":"John"}, {"name":"Mary"} ],
    index: function() {
        return data.names.indexOf(this);
    }
};

var html = Mustache.render(template, data);

In your template:

{{#names}}
    {{name}} is {{index}}
{{/names}}

The drawback is that this index function has the array hard coded data.names to make it a more dynamic, we can use another function like this:

var data = { 
   names: [ {"name":"John"}, {"name":"Mary"} ],
    index: function() {
        return function(array, render) {
            return data[array].indexOf(this);
        }
    }
};

var html = Mustache.render(template, data);

Usage in your template:

{{#names}}
    {{name}} is {{#index}}names{{/index}}
{{/names}}

Also a small drawback is that you have to pass the array name to the index function in this example names, {{#index}}names{{/index}}.

  • Another problem is that this algorithm is O(N^2), which might cause problems over moderately sized lists. Each time you get the index on one item, you have to search the whole list. – Steve Cooper Jul 21 '16 at 9:27
4

Great helper here:

// {{#each_with_index records}}
//  <li class="legend_item{{index}}"><span></span>{{Name}}</li>
// {{/each_with_index}}

Handlebars.registerHelper("each_with_index", function(array, fn) {
    var buffer = "";
    for (var i = 0, j = array.length; i < j; i++) {
        var item = array[i];

        // stick an index property onto the item, starting with 1, may make configurable later
        item.index = i+1;

        // show the inside of the block
        buffer += fn(item);
    }

    // return the finished buffer
    return buffer;

});

Source: https://gist.github.com/1048968

1

If you can control the output of the JSON string, then try this out.

{ "names": [ {"name":"John", "index":"1"}, {"name":"Mary", "index":"2"} ] }

So when you make your JSON string, add the index as another property for each object.

  • Is there anyway to do it without having to add in the index property to the data? The data I'm getting doesn't have it in there, and I take a subset of it. I was hoping to get an index for free. – christophercotton Feb 16 '11 at 20:51
  • There doesn't seem to be, unfortunately. You could try iterating over it in your JS before you run the templating, and adding indexes then. Or take a look at the source and see if you can add something to return the current index. – sciritai Feb 16 '11 at 21:01
  • Ok, I'll leave this open for a couple of days to see if there is any other solution. Otherwise I'll mark this one as correct. – christophercotton Feb 16 '11 at 21:08
  • there is a better solution below, you should change your selected answer – lukemh Jul 3 '12 at 13:47
  • Which solution you are referring to? many of the other solutions (besides the now native support in Handlebars for the index) only allow for the index to be retrieved once. Which is not a great solution, especially since we need to insert the index more than once in our templates. – christophercotton Nov 26 '12 at 16:55
1

My major use case for this was the ability to place an 'active' class on items. I messed around with combining an "equals" helper with and "index_for_each" helper, but it was way too complicated.

Instead, I came up with the following basic "active" helper. It's very specific, but is such a common use case for any menu / select list scenario:

Usage:

  <ul>
    {{{active 2}}}
    {{#each menuItem}}
      <li class="{{{active}}}">{{this}}</li>
    {{/each}}
  </div>

Would make the 3rd menu item have a "class='active'".

The helper is here (this is the CoffeeScript version):

active = 0
cur = 0
handlebars.registerHelper 'active', (item, context) ->
  if arguments.length == 2
    active = item
    cur = 0
    ''
  else if cur++ == active
    'active'
1

As long as you're not traveling into more than one array you can store the index on the helper and just increment when the context changes. I'm using something similar to the following:

var data = {
    foo: [{a: 'a', 'b': 'a'}, {'a':'b', 'b':'b'}], 
    i: function indexer() {
        indexer.i = indexer.i || 0;
        if (indexer.last !== this && indexer.last) {                                          
            indexer.i++;
        }   
        indexer.last = this;
        return String(indexer.i);
     }   
};

Mustache.render('{{#foo}}{{a}}{{i}}{{b}}{{i}}{{/foo}}', data);
1

(Tested in node 4.4.7, moustache 2.2.1.)

If you want a nice clean functional way to do it, that doesn't involve global variables or mutating the objects themselves, use this function;

var withIds = function(list, propertyName, firstIndex) {
    firstIndex |= 0;
    return list.map( (item, idx) => {
        var augmented = Object.create(item);
        augmented[propertyName] = idx + firstIndex;
        return augmented;
    })
};

Use it when you're assembling your view;

var view = {
    peopleWithIds: withIds(people, 'id', 1) // add 'id' property to all people, starting at index 1
};

The neat thing about this approach is that it creates a new set of 'viewmodel' objects, using the old set as prototypes. You can read the person.id just as you would read person.firstName. However, this function doesn't change your people objects at all, so other code (which might have relied on the ID property not being there) will not be affected.

Algorithm is O(N), so nice and fast.

0

Recommended Solution


My recommendation is to add an index key

let data = { "names": [ {"name":"John"}, 
{"name":"Mary"} ] };

// Add an index manually
data = {
  names: [
    { id: 0, name: "John" },
    { id: 1, name: "Mary" }
  ]
};

// Add an index with a loop
data = data.names
  .map(function (name, i) {
    name.id = i;
    return name;
  });

// Nested arrays with indices (parentId, childId)
data = {
  names: [{
    parentId: 0,
    name: "John",
    friends: [{
      childId: 0,
      name: "Mary"
    }]
  }]
};

Other proposed solutions are not as clean, and suffer from quite a few issues as detailed below.


Problems with proposed Mustache Index solutions


@Index

Mustache does not support @Index

IndexOf

This solution runs in O(n^2) time, and therefore it does not have the best performance. Also the index must be manually created for each list.

const data = {
  list: ['a', 'b', 'c'],
  listIndex: function () {
    return data.list.indexOf(this);
  }
};

Mustache.render('{{#list}}{{listIndex}}{{/list}}', data);

Global Variable

This solution runs in O(n) time, so better performance here, but also "pollutes the global space" (i.e. any properties added to the window object, do not get garbage collected until the browser window closes), and the index must be manually created for each list.

const data = {
  list: ['a', 'b', 'c'],
  listIndex: function () {
    return (++window.listIndex || (window.listIndex = 0));
  }
};

Mustache.render('{{#list}}{{listIndex}}{{/list}}', data);

Local Variable

This solution runs in O(n) time, does not "pollute the global space", and does not need to be manually created for each list. However, the solution is complex and does not work well with nested lists.

const data = {
  listA: ['a', 'b', 'c'],
  index: () => name => (++data[`${name}Index`] || (data[`${name}Index`] = 0))
};

Mustache.render('{{#listA}}{{#index}}listA{{/index}}{{/listA}}', data);
0
<script>var index = 1;</script>
{{#names}}
    {{name}} is <script>document.write(index++);</script>
{{/names}}

This works perfectly fine.

  • 2
    It kind of defeats the purpose of Mustache. – Imantas Dec 28 '18 at 14:00
0

I'm using a pre calculate function to inject '@index' into array.

const putIndexInArray = array => {
    let putIndex = (value, index) => {
        value['@index'] = index;

        return value;
    };

    if (!Array.isArray(array)) {
        return array;
    }

    return array.map(putIndex);
};

Mustache.render(template, {
    array: putIndexInArray(['Homer', 'Marge', 'Lisa'])
});

and then using like this:

{{#array}}
    {{@index}}
{{/array}}

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