16

I created the following structure:

├── Assets
├── Scenes
├── Scripts
│   └── MyExample.cs
├── Tests
│   ├── MyExampleTest.cs
│   └── Tests.asmdef

Now, when I click on Run All, in the Test Runner window, in Unity, I have the following error:

The type or namespace name `MyExample' could not be found. Are you missing an assembly reference?

In Visual Studio I have two projects:

  • Assembly-CSharp (containing src)

  • Tests (containing Tests)

I added Assembly-CSharp as a reference in the second project. Visual Studio is able to build the solution with no errors.

Does anyone know how to properly setup a UnitTest regression for a Unity project?

This is Tests.asmdef

{
    "name": "Tests",
    "optionalUnityReferences": [
        "TestAssemblies"
    ]
}

MyExampleTest.cs

using UnityEngine;
using UnityEngine.TestTools;
using NUnit.Framework;
using System.Collections;
using abc;

public class MyExampleTest{

    [Test]
    public void NewTestScriptSimplePasses() {
        // Use the Assert class to test conditions.
    }

    [UnityTest]
    public IEnumerator NewTestScriptWithEnumeratorPasses() {
        abc.Example m;
        Assert.That(false);
        yield return null;
    }
}

MyExample.cs

namespace abc
{
    public class Example
    {


    }
}
  • Which version of Unity are you using? Just in case, does your Tests.asmdef file reference test assemblies that are editor only? Otherwise, note that Unity unit tests need to be in an Editor folder. – sonny May 8 '18 at 13:46
  • @sonny I update the question with the file Tests.asmdef. Unity version 2018.1.0f2 – HAL9000 May 8 '18 at 13:59
  • It looks like that adding the reference within Visual Studio is ineffective in Unity. When I close and reopen the reference is not set anymore – HAL9000 May 8 '18 at 14:02
  • I added an answer attempt, but could you show if you see the tests already in the Unity Test Runner window? – sonny May 8 '18 at 15:06
18

Try using the built-in Test Runner UI to set-up your Test Assembly Folder and first Test script.

Use Window -> Test Runner -> EditMode -> "Create Test Assembly Folder", and once you navigate to the new Test Assembly Folder, use the Create Test Script in current folder button.

In particular, your Tests.asmdef is missing an "Editor" include compared to the default setup (in Unity 2018.1).

{
    "name": "Tests",
    "optionalUnityReferences": [
        "TestAssemblies"
    ],
    "includePlatforms": [
        "Editor"
    ]
}

You should not have to do anything manually in Visual Studio project for the purpose of setting up your tests.

Note that when my Assembly File is set to "Any Platform" as follows (like in your question):

{
    "name": "Tests",
    "optionalUnityReferences": [
        "TestAssemblies"
    ]
}

My tests do not show up in the Test Runner window.

When my Assembly File is explicitly set to include "Editor" platform only (as per my previous example), my tests show up correctly in the Test Runner window.

(This behaviour seems a bit counterintuitive to me.)


You also need to set up an Assembly Definition for your scripts. Under your Scripts, folder, create an assembly definition file MyScriptAssembly.asmdef (using the Unity menu Assets -> Create -> Assembly Definition or manually):

{
    "name": "MyScriptAssembly"
}

Then, make sure your Tests.asmdef reference your script Assembly:

{
    "name": "Tests",
    "references": [
        "MyScriptAssembly"
    ],
    "optionalUnityReferences": [
        "TestAssemblies"
    ],
    "includePlatforms": [
        "Editor"
    ],
    "excludePlatforms": [],
    "allowUnsafeCode": false
}

You can also set this up in the Unity Editor inspector window. See 'References' in the Inspector when selecting a .asmdef file:

assembly definition inspector window

(For more details, see Unity's documentation on assembly definition files)

  • thanks for helping. I created a new Tests folder following your procedure: I still have the same compilation error. The empty test is working fine, but I can't use my Example class – HAL9000 May 8 '18 at 15:41
  • Maybe it's something specific to your MyExample.cs and MyExampleTest.cs. Could you update your question with the code for those files? – sonny May 8 '18 at 15:56
  • I think the problem is somewhere in how Unity creates the projects references. I updated the question – HAL9000 May 8 '18 at 16:10
  • 2
    I had some other strange error. I re-created the project, following your advise and, finally, it's working. I really thank you :) The problem was with the missing Assembly definition. – HAL9000 May 8 '18 at 16:48
  • 2
    Thank you for this great answer! – rennat Dec 1 '18 at 21:38
4

Finally found the right proper solution for this. And everything is done through the Editor.

So our goal is to have the test assembly reference the real-code assembly. In order to do that you need to define both assemblies and then set up the reference in unity.

  1. Create your tests as usual from inside Unity. With the generation of the assembly.
  2. Go to your scripts folder (usually Assets/Scripts) and right click -> Create Assembly definition this will create an assembly file in there as well.
  3. Go to your tests assembly info in Unity and add a reference to your real assembly and also make sure that it's only marked for the Editor platform.

You're set. Your tests should be visible and runnable in Unity and they can reference any other script.


Keep in mind that you are safe to delete ALL .csproj and .sln files in the root folder and Unity will recreate them (also they should not be on source control).

So your test to go for changes like that should always be to

  1. Delete any visual studio related file in the folder.
  2. Select Assets -> Open C# project. Let it do its thing.
  3. If everything compiles and runs and your tests do so as well you've set things up nicely.

Bonus: We also have a couple of debug projects in our project which are located in Assets/DebugScenes/DebugScripts. By creating a separate assembly for them and have it reference the real scripts assembly (if needed) and marking it as Editor platform we make sure these scripts are never included in our build without any extra steps during build.


Extra reading. You might be thinking that you don't want to create an assembly for ALL your scripts since you only want to test some of them. And it's true you can create an assembly for a subfolder but this will get you into trouble as then you have to create a reference from one real scripts assembly to another. So make sure everything is nice and tidy and makes sense...


Our test and real script assembly infos side-by-side. Game Title has Planetary in it

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