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Hello I am trying to figure out to split a program into multiple file format to have a .h file and 2 .c files. I have a full program but just for this example, I would like the function of printing of the output to be in a seperate .c file. I know how to make a function of basic arithmetic like

int Sum(int a, int b) 
{ 
    return a+b; 
}

but how would I make a function with a for loop and just the code below?

for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
{
    printf("\n%s", ptr[i]->name);
    printf("%s", ptr[i]->street);
    printf("%s", ptr[i]->citystate);
    printf("%s", ptr[i]->zip);
    free(ptr[i]);    
}

I get the way it works is like this, just dont know how to make a for loop into a function.

Functions.h:

#ifndef FUNCTIONS_H_INCLUDED
#define FUNCTIONS_H_INCLUDED
/* ^^ these are the include guards */

/* Prototypes for the functions */
/* Sums two ints */
int Sum(int a, int b);

#endif

Functions.c:

/* In general it's good to include also the header of the current .c,
   to avoid repeating the prototypes */
#include "Functions.h"

int Sum(int a, int b)
{
    return a+b;
}

Main.c

#include "stdio.h"
/* To use the functions defined in Functions.c I need to #include Functions.h */
#include "Functions.h"

int main(void)
{
    int a, b;
    printf("Insert two numbers: ");
    if(scanf("%d %d", &a, &b)!=2)
    {
        fputs("Invalid input", stderr);
        return 1;
    }
    printf("%d + %d = %d", a, b, Sum(a, b));
    return 0;

}

  • 1
    The problem you are having with that is unclear. Pleae make a minimal reproducible example which is in one .c file and uses the loop above from a function (probably with parameters int count, mystruct* ptr at a guess). Then explain what keeps you from splitting the using function into another .c. – Yunnosch May 8 '18 at 5:46
  • 1
    The program you show does not contain a for loop. You are not asking about how to use a for loop in a function, are you? If you are, change the title and the explanation, please. – Yunnosch May 8 '18 at 5:50
  • The for loop is for printing the results, its on the top. The example I showed is just to show i did research. My question is both, I need to do multiple file format with my program, specifically I was going to do it with that for loop function. Just not sure how. – user9593492 May 8 '18 at 5:56
  • 1
    @user9593492 -- you still stuck on this? I thought you were making progress? If you are summing a+b in a separate source -- then why are you still dragging the old code from the address sort around? If you have code you are currently working on that shows how the sum relates to the address, post the entire code. It is really difficult for people to help you with only part of your code shown -- this isn't poker -- it's OK to show your hand. – David C. Rankin May 8 '18 at 6:08
  • @DavidC.Rankin Yeah Im trying to seperate the files. Yes the full code is posted there now. – user9593492 May 8 '18 at 22:45
2

At the simplest, you'd convert the loop fragment into:

void print_and_destroy(size_t count, SomeType ptr[count])
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        printf("\n%s", ptr[i]->name);
        printf("%s", ptr[i]->street);
        printf("%s", ptr[i]->citystate);
        printf("%s", ptr[i]->zip);
        free(ptr[i]);
    }
    free(ptr);
}

The final free is there because the array is now contains no useful pointers (they've all been freed). You could add ptr[i] = NULL; after the free(ptr[i]); instead. That indicates that there is no data there any more.

However, as noted in the comments 1 and 2 by SergeyA, and the clumsy but accurate function name, this isn't a good breakdown of the code. You need two functions:

void destroy(size_t count, SomeType ptr[count])
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        free(ptr[i]);
        ptr[i] = NULL;  // Option 1
    }
    free(ptr);          // Option 2
}

You would not use option 1 if you use option 2 (though it would do no actual harm). If you do not use option 2, you should use option 1.

void print(size_t count, const SomeType ptr[count])
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        printf("%s, ", ptr[i]->name);
        printf("%s, ", ptr[i]->street);
        printf("%s, ", ptr[i]->citystate);
        printf("%s\n", ptr[i]->zip);
    }
}

Note that you probably need space between the fields of the address. You might or might not want one line for name, one line for street address, and one line for city, state and zip code — choose your format to suit. Generally, output newlines at the end of output, not at the beginning unless you want double spacing.


So that would be my separate function.c file and my header file would look something like …code omitted… right? How would the function call in the main program look like?

The outline of the header would be:

#ifndef HEADER_H_INCLUDED
#define HEADER_H_INCLUDED

#include <stddef.h>      // Smallest header that defines size_t

typedef struct SomeType
{
    char name[32];
    char street[32];
    char citystate[32];
    char zip[11];        // Allow for ZIP+4 and terminal null
} SomeType;

extern void print_and_destroy(size_t count, SomeType ptr[count]);

#endif /* HEADER_H_INCLUDED */

Note that the header doesn't include <stdio.h>; no part of the interface depends on anything that's specific to <stdio.h>, such as a FILE * (though <stdio.h> is one of the headers that defines size_t). A header should be minimal, but self-contained and idempotent. Not including <stdio.h> is part of being minimal; including <stddef.h> is part of being self-contained; and the header guards are the key part of being idempotent. It means you can include the header and not have to worry about whether it has already been included before indirectly or is included again later, indirectly, and you don't have to worry about what other headers have to be included — the header is self-contained and deals with that.

In your main(), you'd have something like:

enum { MAX_ADDRESSES = 20 };
SomeType *data[MAX_ADDRESSES];

…memory allocation…
…data loading…

print_and_destroy(MAX_ADDRESSES, data);
| improve this answer | |
  • This is an example of rather bad design. Print and destroy doesn't make a lot of sense when expressed as a function. It would be better to have them as two separate functions, print and destroy. It is also very counter-intuitive (especially for newbies) that array size plays no role in function signature. Because of that, I always suggest going with pointer, i.e. SomeType* ptr – SergeyA May 8 '18 at 5:58
  • @SergeyA: Yes, but I'm encapsulating what was shown. You're right; the print code should be given a const SomeType array, which it doesn't modify, and the destroy code should be given the modifiable pointer and a directive to release the memory. – Jonathan Leffler May 8 '18 at 6:00
  • Sure thing, but I just believe mechanical encapsulation here is not showing the best principles, OP would be better helped with non-mechanical illustration of split responsibilities (which is one of the reasons why we use the functions) – SergeyA May 8 '18 at 6:01
  • So that would be my seperate function.c file and my header file would look something like #ifndef my_header_file #define my_header_file #include <stdio.h> void print_and_destroy(size_t count, SomeType ptr[count]) #endif right? How would the function call in the main program look like? I put my full code here. pastebin.com/Kse3nXnL – user9593492 May 8 '18 at 6:06
  • 1
    @user9593492: I don't want to go looking at pastebin material. The information should be in the question — sufficient information is in the question, though it could perhaps be better presented and augmented with some, but not all, of what's probably in the pastebin. Please read about how to create an MCVE (minimal reproducible example). The header should contain the function declaration, but for most practical purposes, it also needs to contain the structure definition as the functions using it will need to know about the type (though you could simply have typedef struct SomeType SomeType; in the header). …… – Jonathan Leffler May 8 '18 at 6:25
2

There are two different issues involved (I recommend to address the first one, if so needed, before the second one):

  • how to split a monolithic translation unit in several ones, but keeping the same functions

  • how to refactor a code to make it more readable and made of "smaller" and "better" functions. In your case, this is the main issue.


The first question, for example splitting a small single program in a single myprog.c file of a few dozen thousands of lines, is quite easy. The real issue is to organize that cleverly (and then it becomes harder, and opinion based). You just need to put mostly declarations in your header file, and to put definitions in several translation units, and of course to improve your build process to use and link them together. So you would have first a single common header file myheader.h declaring your types, macros, functions, global variables. You would also define some short static inline functions there, if you need them. Then you would have several C files (technically translation units) foo.c, bar.c, dingo.c, and you'll better put several related functions in each of them. Each such C file has #include "myheader.h". You'll better use some build automation tool, probably GNU make (or something else, e.g. ninja) that you would configure with your Makefile. You could later have several header files, but for a small project of only several dozen thousands of source code lines that might be not needed. In some cases, you would generate some C file from a higher-level description (e.g. use simple metaprogramming techniques).

The second question (code refactoring) is really difficult, and has no simple universal answer. It really depends of the project. A simple (and very debatable, and over-simplifying) rule of thumb is that you need to have functions "doing only one thing" and of at most a few dozen lines each. So as soon as a function does more than one thing or has more than one or two dozen lines you should consider splitting and refactoring it (but you won't always do that). Obviously your main should be split in several stuff.


At last, don't fail into the excessive habit of putting only one function per *.c file, or have lots of small *.c files of only a hundred lines each. This is generally useless, and could increase your build time (because the preprocessor would work a lot), and perhaps even slightly decrease the runtime performance of your executable (because your optimizing compiler won't be able to inline, unless you use link-time optimization). My recommendation (opinion-based, so debatable) is to have source files of several thousand lines each containing several (dozen of) functions.

In your case, I believe your program (in your question) is so tiny that you don't need to split it into several translation units (unless your teacher asks you to). But indeed you need to refactor it, perhaps defining some abstract data type and routines supporting it (see this).


Study the source code of existing free software (e.g. on github) related to your project for inspiration, since you'll need to define and follow many coding conventions (and coding rules) which matter a lot with C programming. In your newbie case, I believe that studying the source of any small free software program (of a few dozen thousand lines, see this) -in a domain you are understanding or interested in, and in the programming language you are practicing- will profit you a lot.

| improve this answer | |

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