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Problem:

I have a @OneToOne relation between a parent and a child, the relation is mapped by the child and orphanRemoval is set to true. The child also has a @ManyToMany relation with a third entity.

When setting the child to null (hoping to delete the child) I get a integrity constraint violation: foreign key...

Test model:

A Tutor has a OneToOne relation with a Student which has a ManyToMany relation with Course entities:

  • The OneToOne relation is mapped by Student.tutor (ID_TUTOR foreign key column in the STUDENT table)
    • cascade = ALL
    • orphanRemoval = true
  • The ManyToMany relation is kept in a join table STUDENT_COURSE with foreign keys to STUDENT and COURSE tables.

I am using Hibernate 5.0.11 (JPA 2.1). For my test, I used HSQLDB but the issue also occurs on Oracle database.

Scenario:

I have a Tutor linked to a Student containing a list ouf Course. When setting the Student of the Tutor to null Hibernate directly issues the SQL "delete from Student where id=?" which result in "integrity constraint violation: foreign key no action; FK1XM2HEI9CHMWOQF2WFM104NMG table: STUDENT_COURSE"

This problem does not occur when the OneToMany relation is not "inversed" (no mappedBy and ID_STUDENT foreign key in the TUTOR table). In this case, the Student entity is correctly removed from the DB as well as its related records in the STUDENT_COURSE table.

Code:

@Entity
public class Tutor {
    private Long id;
    private String name;
    private Student student;
    public Tutor() { super(); }
    public Tutor(String name, Student student) {
        super();
        this.name = name;
        setStudent(student);
    }
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    public Long getId() { return id; }
    public void setId(Long id) { this.id = id; }
    public String getName() { return name; }
    public void setName(String name) { this.name = name; }
    @OneToOne(cascade=CascadeType.ALL, orphanRemoval=true, mappedBy="tutor")
    public Student getStudent() { return student; }
    public void setStudent(Student student) {
        this.student = student;
        if(student != null) {
            student.setTutor(this);
        }
    }
}

@Entity
public class Student {
    private Long id;
    private String name;
    private Map<String, Course> courses;
    private Tutor tutor;
    public Student() { super(); }
    public Student(String name, Map<String, Course> courses) {
        super();
        this.name = name;
        this.courses = courses;
    }
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    public Long getId() { return id; }
    public void setId(Long id) { this.id = id; }
    public String getName() { return name; }
    public void setName(String name) { this.name = name; }
    @ManyToMany
    public Map<String, Course> getCourses() { return courses; }
    public void setCourses(Map<String, Course> courses) { this.courses = courses; }
    @OneToOne
    public Tutor getTutor() { return tutor; }
    public void setTutor(Tutor tutor) { this.tutor = tutor; }   
}

@Entity
public class Course {
    private Long id;
    private String name;
    public Course() { super(); }
    public Course(String name) {
        super();
        this.name = name;
    }
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    public Long getId() { return id; }
    public void setId(Long id) { this.id = id; }
    public String getName() { return name; }
    public void setName(String name) { this.name = name; }
}

public class CheckManyToManyDeletation {
    private static final Logger logger = Logger.getLogger(CheckManyToManyDeletation.class);
    private static SessionFactory sessionFactory;
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        DOMConfigurator.configure("log4j-config.xml");
        Class[] mappings =  new Class[] {Tutor.class, Student.class, Course.class};
        DBUtils.createTables(mappings);
        sessionFactory = DBUtils.createSessionFactory(mappings);
        try {
            long tutorId = initialImport();

            Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
            Transaction tx = session.beginTransaction();

            Tutor tutor = session.get(Tutor.class, tutorId);
            logger.info("DeletingStudent");
            tutor.setStudent(null);

            tx.commit();
        } finally {
            sessionFactory.close();
        }

    }

    private static long initialImport() {
        Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
        Transaction tx = session.beginTransaction();
        Student student = new Student();
        student.setName("student");

        Map<String, Course> courses = new HashMap<>();
        student.setCourses(courses);
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
            Course course = new Course();
            course.setName("course" + i);
            session.save(course);
            courses.put(course.getName(), course);
        }

        Tutor tutor = new Tutor("tutor", student);
        session.save(tutor);
        tx.commit();
        session.close();
        return tutor.getId();
    }
}

Notes:

Actually our application comes with a huge data model:

  • Persisting and removing entities is done via the cascading,
  • we inverse the OneToOne relations to give the child the same id as its parent (via @MapsId).
  • Don't you mind to add cascade to the Courses? – Andriy Slobodyanyk May 8 '18 at 16:37
  • Maybe I'll look later but for starters you shouldn't be deleting a database entry by setting things to null. You need to look at the Database schema being created and think about this. A Student can have more than one Tutor and a Tutor can have more than one Student so it's a ManyToMany relationship and should be handled by a join table. The correct way to delete it is to remove the Student from the Tutor's list of Student's or vice versa. – K.Nicholas May 8 '18 at 16:37
  • Our business models are quite complex. That is why I created a test model but may not completely reflect our constraints: – Christophe Camus May 9 '18 at 9:40
  • Our business model is quite complex. That is why I created a test model but may not completely reflect our constraints. 1° Course represent an entity which has a full life cycle on its own, this is the reason why there is no cascading. 2° Tutor and Student represent two of our entities which have a real functional one to one relationship. They even have the same id (it is not the case of the test model witch map the relation with a join column, but we have the same exception and I wanted to simplify the test model by removing the "@MapsId additional complexity") – Christophe Camus May 9 '18 at 9:49

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