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Greeting,

Level: between beginner to intermediate

Here is my candidate array printing function I have:

void print_array(void * arr, int len, size_t size) {

    if (size == sizeof(int)) {
        int i;
        for (i = 0; i < len - 1; i ++) {
            printf("%d, ", ((int *) arr)[i]);
        }
        printf("%d\n", ((int *) arr)[i]);
    } else if (size == sizeof(double)) {
        ...
    } ...

}

I am trying to make it platform independent. It works fine for my project. I am wondering what kind of problems this function would produce if it were included within the standard C libraries. And also, why is there no array printing function within the C libraries?

Thanks.

  • size of type is really not a good discriminator for the type itself. int can be very well of the same length as double. – Eugene Sh. May 8 '18 at 15:45
  • Understood. I don't see a way to up-vote this answer... – RayaneCTX May 8 '18 at 15:51
  • 1
    Because it is a comment :) – Eugene Sh. May 8 '18 at 15:53
  • I know this is a late comment, but did you know there is an actual Code Review site included within StackExchange? Submit things like this and people will naturally look at them with objective expertise to make comments answering many of the questions you have asked here. – ryyker Nov 20 '19 at 13:32
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Technically nothing is stopping int from being the same size as something else, for example I believe on x64 int and float are the exact same size. C doesn't really have anyway to do this built into it, what I would suggest is either passing the type as a certain code and then having your array print from there.

void print_array(void *arr, size_t len, int type){
    //handle print here
}

where the type argument can have different values for different types. Also note the use of size_t instead of int to hold the length of the array.

You could also do it using macros, you could do something like

#define DEF_NEW_ARRAY(TYPE, TYPE_NAME)
typedef struct TYPE_NAME{
    TYPE *arr;
    size_t len;
} TYPE_NAME;
void TYPENAME##_print(TYPE_NAME *arr){
    //define your function
}

then you could do use this macro as such

DEF_NEW_ARRAY(int, int_arr)
int_arr x;

after which you could initialize the array and print your values etc.

C11 also introduced the _Generic. You can read about it here

http://en.cppreference.com/w/c/language/generic

  • If you know, does Python implement its print() function in a way similar to the options you described? (yes or no answer is fine) – RayaneCTX May 8 '18 at 17:25
  • Python handles things differently with its own structures and such. You can look at the implementation of print in cpython here hg.python.org/cpython/file/937fa81500e2/Python/… – zee May 8 '18 at 18:19
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You could follow the qsort model and pass a delegate function to handle the actual formatting:

void print_array( void *array, size_t arrsize, size_t eltsize, const char *(*fmt)( const void *item ) )
{
  unsigned char *cur = array;
  fprintf( stdout, "{" );
  if ( arrsize > 0 )
  {
    fprintf( stdout, "%s", fmt( cur ) );
    cur += eltsize;

    for ( size_t i = 1; i < arrsize; i++ )
    {
      fprintf( stdout, ", %s", fmt( cur ) );
      cur += eltsize;
    }
  }
  fprintf( stdout, "}" );
}

If you want to print out an array of integers, you create a formatting function for an integer and pass it to print_array:

const char *intFmt( const void *item )
{
  static char buffer[12];
  sprintf( buffer, "%d", *(const int *) item );
  return buffer;
}

If you want to print an array of doubles, you'd create a different formatting function:

const char *dblFmt( const void *item )
{
  static char buffer[12];
  sprintf( buffer, "%10.2f", *(const double  *) item );
  return buffer;
}

You could create formatters for aggregate types (structs, unions, other arrays), enums, etc., giving you almost unlimited flexibility. Also, by delegating type-aware stuff to the formatters, your print_array function itself stays simple; you don't have to hack it every time you want to support a new type.

There are drawbacks to this approach. There's no way for the compiler to warn you when you're using the wrong formatter for a given type (anytime you muck around with void *, you're throwing type safety out the window). Also, in this implementation, I'm using static buffers in the formatters, making them non-reentrant and not thread safe. It would be better to pass a target buffer to print_array (which it would pass through to the formatter), but I'm trying to keep the example somewhat readable.

You would probably also want to pass the output stream as an argument, rather than always print to stdout.

But, this should at least give you a flavor of what's possible. Here's a complete implementation, along with some sample output:

#include <stdio.h>

void print_array( void *array, size_t arrsize, size_t eltsize, const char *(*fmt)( const void *item ) )
{
  unsigned char *cur = array;
  fprintf( stdout, "{" );
  if ( arrsize > 0 )
  {
    fprintf( stdout, "%s", fmt( cur ) );
    cur += eltsize;

    for ( size_t i = 1; i < arrsize; i++ )
    {
      fprintf( stdout, ", %s", fmt( cur ) );
      cur += eltsize;
    }
  }
  fprintf( stdout, "}" );
}

const char *intFmt( const void *item )
{
  static char buffer[12];
  sprintf( buffer, "%d", *(const int *) item );
  return buffer;
}

const char *dblFmt( const void *item )
{
  static char buffer[12];
  sprintf( buffer, "%10.2f", *(const double  *) item );
  return buffer;
}

struct node {
  int val;
  struct node *next;
};

const char *nodeFmt( const void *item )
{
  static char buffer[50];
  const struct node *value = item;

  sprintf( buffer, "{ val: %d; next %p }", value->val, (void *) value->next );
  return buffer;
}

const char *voidFmt( const void *item )
{
  static char buffer[20];
  sprintf( buffer, "%p", item );
  return buffer;
}

int main( void )
{
  int iArr[] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
  double dArr[] = {2.0, 4.0, 8.0, 16.0};
  struct node nArr[] = { {1, NULL}, {2, NULL} };

  void *arrs[] = { iArr, dArr, nArr };

  nArr[0].next = &nArr[1];

  print_array( iArr, sizeof iArr / sizeof *iArr, sizeof *iArr, intFmt );
  putchar( '\n' );
  print_array( dArr, sizeof dArr / sizeof *dArr, sizeof *dArr, dblFmt ); 
  putchar( '\n' );
  print_array( nArr, sizeof nArr / sizeof *nArr, sizeof *nArr, nodeFmt );
  putchar( '\n' );
  print_array( arrs, sizeof arrs / sizeof *arrs, sizeof *arrs, voidFmt );
  putchar( '\n' );

  return 0;
}

Output:

jbode:print_array john.bode$ ./print_array 
{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}
{      2.00,       4.00,       8.00,      16.00}
{{ val: 1; next 0x7ffeeafc5a70 }, { val: 2; next 0x0 }}
{0x7ffeeafc5a40, 0x7ffeeafc5a48, 0x7ffeeafc5a50}

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