trying to make a site WCAG 2.0 compliant by adding a "skip to content" link that is off-page but should then appear when a user tabs to it.

I'm new to tabindex so maybe I've go that wrong. Here is the code in Wordpress:

    <body <?php body_class(); ?>> 
      <div class="top-bar" tabindex="0">
        <a href="#content" class="skip">Skip to content</a> 
      </div>    
    ...

And this is the css to make it work:

    /*skip link*/
    .skip {
      position: absolute;
      top: -1000px;
      left: -1000px;
      height: 1px;
      width: 1px;
      text-align: left;
      overflow: hidden;
    }

    .skip:focus {
       position: absolute;
       top: 50px;
       left: 50px;
       height: 50px;
       width: 100px;
       text-align: left;
       overflow: hidden;
    }    

According my limited knowledge of the literature, screen readers and other assistive devices are supposed to be able to naturally tab to a link. The div the encloses it is not, but adding tabindex="0" is supposed to fix that.

If you could point me to what I'm doing wrong, that would be much appreciated.

  • What happens when you tab to it? It doesn’t appear, or it appears but the link doesn’t work, or...? – stringy May 9 at 8:37
  • i'm not sure if wordpress is getting in the way, but the method you're doing it is right. having a CSS that moves the link into view when it receives focus. you can see a working example at webaim.org. perhaps look at their css/html to see how closely it matches what you're doing – slugolicious May 10 at 22:12

You don't need the tabindex for that top-bar div container - the link will get focus in the tab sequence by itself. Just make sure the link (including its container) is before everything else, directly after the opening body tag.

According my limited knowledge of the literature, screen readers and other assistive devices are supposed to be able to naturally tab to a link. The div the encloses it is not, but adding tabindex="0" is supposed to fix that.

Not all assistive technologies can naturally focus on a link if it's not visible.

For instance, eye tracking devices or touchscreens will not benefit of the skip link.

Make the "skip to content" link visible, and remove the tabindex=0 which make it impossible to access the link.

  • can you explain "remove the tabindex=0 which make it impossible to access the link." why does it make it impossible to access the link? if the <div> has tabindex=0 and the <a> is naturally focusable (if it has an href), then you'd just end up with two tab stops. one on the <div> and one on the <a>. – slugolicious May 10 at 22:10
  • Using eye tracking device for instance. But more generally, an anchor element should not contain another anchor element (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/a). By adding a tabindex=0 on the div, the same should apply and user agents may consider the div as an anchor – Adam May 11 at 5:00

There are a couple of ways you can meet the bypass blocks criteria, one is to add landmarks to your pages. Skip links are also useful, especially for keyboard users who do not have a screenreader (e.g. for mobility issues).

In this case remove the tabindex from the parent div, and I think you need to include .skip:active as well.

Try the code snippets from this article on hiding elements properly using the clip method and showing on focus.

  • landmarks are awesome but i'm disappointed they're only useful with screen readers. one day i hope browsers will surface this feature to keyboard users too – slugolicious May 10 at 22:06

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