22

When I am trying to install .whl with pip

it said:

... is not a supported wheel on this platform

to solve this problem, I searched the Internet and it said I can input this into repl

import pip; print(pip.pep425tags.get_supported())

with this I can see the tags and versions that pip supports

However, when I input this code, it said:

AttributeError: module 'pip' has no attribute 'pep425tags'

What's wrong?

(pip 10.0.1 on python 3.6)

1
  • I’m voting to close this question because the question issue is outdated and refers to a python version that is already far beyond EOL.
    – not2qubit
    Nov 28, 2022 at 3:50

10 Answers 10

30

To print the list of compatible tags with current versions of pip :

$ path/to/pythonX.Y -m pip debug --verbose

The pip debug subcommand is available since v19.2 (July 2019).


To get the list of compatible tags from Python code, I recommend using the packaging library and its packaging.tags.sys_tags() function:

import packaging.tags

tags = packaging.tags.sys_tags()

print('\n'.join([f'{tag.interpreter}-{tag.abi}-{tag.platform}' for tag in tags]))
8

This worked for me with Python 2.7 (in a virtualenv using that version):

import wheel.pep425tags

print(wheel.pep425tags.get_supported())
1
  • 1
    This is gone since April 2020 and it is clearly stated in wheel's README that there is no stable API.
    – wim
    Mar 29, 2022 at 15:51
7

For pip v10 use this:

import pip._internal; print(pip._internal.pep425tags.get_supported())
1
  • 1
    pip._internal should not be used.
    – wim
    Mar 29, 2022 at 19:28
3

Using Python 3.6.8 and pip 19.1.1

python -c "import wheel.pep425tags as w print(w.get_supported())"

worked!

Output:

[('cp36', 'cp36m', 'win_amd64'), ('cp36', 'none', 'win_amd64'), ('cp36', 'none', 'any'), ('cp3', 'none', 'any'), ('cp35', 'none', 'any'), ('cp34', 'none', 'any'), ('cp33', 'none', 'any'), ('cp32', 'none', 'any'), ('cp31', 'none', 'any'), ('cp30', 'none', 'any'), ('py3', 'none', 'win_amd64'), ('py36', 'none', 'any'), ('py3', 'none', 'any'), ('py35', 'none', 'any'), ('py34', 'none', 'any'), ('py33', 'none', 'any'), ('py32', 'none', 'any'), ('py31', 'none', 'any'), ('py30', 'none', 'any')]
2
  • You'll have to send one required positional argument "archive_root". So print(w.get_supported(archive_root="")) Apr 22, 2020 at 7:01
  • 1
    This is gone since April 2020 and it is clearly stated in wheel's README that there is no stable API.
    – wim
    Mar 29, 2022 at 15:52
2

The main issue is that pep425tags was an internal thing from the wheel module. I believe it was never meant to be used like that and it was always subject to change. Facing this problem myself just now I noticed that wheel==0.34.1 has pep425tags while wheel==0.35.0 does not.

So if you really want to use this module, make sure to pip3 install wheel==0.34.1.

-1

Try this, if you have a new version of pip and you just want the result of get_supported function call:

python -c "from pip._internal.utils.compatibility_tags import get_supported; print(get_supported())"

# output:
[<cp310-cp310-win_amd64 @ 2517399109376>, <cp310-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399104384>, <cp310-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399161408>, <cp39-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399103040>, <cp38-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399294208>, <cp37-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399294464>, <cp36-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399294720>, <cp35-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399294976>, <cp34-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399295232>, <cp33-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399295488>, <cp32-abi3-win_amd64 @ 2517399104000>, <py310-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399296320>, <py3-none-win_amd64 @ 2517398433664>, <py39-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399296512>, <py38-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399296704>, <py37-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399296960>, <py36-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399297216>, <py35-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399297472>, <py34-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399297728>, <py33-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399297984>, <py32-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399298240>, <py31-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399298496>, <py30-none-win_amd64 @ 2517399298752>, <cp310-none-any @ 2517399299264>, <py310-none-any @ 2517399299008>, <py3-none-any @ 2517399299520>, <py39-none-any @ 2517399299840>, <py38-none-any @ 2517399300032>, <py37-none-any @ 2517399300288>, <py36-none-any @ 2517399300544>, <py35-none-any @ 2517399300800>, <py34-none-any @ 2517399301056>, <py33-none-any @ 2517399301312>, <py32-none-any @ 2517399301568>, <py31-none-any @ 2517399301824>, <py30-none-any @ 2517399302080>]
3
  • 2
    pip._internal should not be used.
    – wim
    Mar 29, 2022 at 19:28
  • @wim I guess there are many opinions about should in python, but since its development is in constant change people just use what works. Your own comment is not more useful that this answer, as you don't explain why it should not be used, when it works.
    – not2qubit
    Oct 21, 2022 at 11:57
  • @not2qubit It should not be used because as indicated by the leading underscore _ and the name itself, it is an internal implementation detail, not a stable API. -- One should use something like this: packaging.tags.sys_tags() instead (which is most likely the library that pip uses itself)
    – sinoroc
    Mar 4, 2023 at 9:54
-2

AMD64

import pip._internal;print(pip._internal.pep425tags.get_supported())

WIN32

import pip;print(pip.pep425tags.get_supported())

then pip install <.whl> by corresponding platform wheel(https://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/)

1
  • 1
    pip._internal should not be used.
    – wim
    Mar 29, 2022 at 19:29
-2

I have several versions of Python in my GNU-Linux machine and this causes some problems for me. Python 2.7, 3.4, 3.6, ...

Too messy! I know. :)

Each time I used python3 and run this code:

import wheel.pep425tags
print(wheel.pep425tags.get_supported())

As yours, I confronted with this error too:

AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'pep425tags'

By surfing inside stackoverflow I noticed some problems as below that may help you:

It's important to know your pip or pip3 is set to which version of Pythons: My mine, pip is set to python 2.7 and pip3 is also set to python 3.6.

First of all, check the version of your pip or pip3:

pip -V

or

pip3 -V

As I use pip3 so it results:

pip 20.0.2 from /usr/local/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pip (python 3.6)

This shows that my pip3 uses python3.6 and this causes me straightly go inside the python3.6 console. In this case it works and results:

[('cp36', 'cp36m', 'linux_x86_64'), ('cp36', 'abi3', 'linux_x86_64'), ('cp36', 'none', 'linux_x86_64'), ('cp35', 'abi3', 'linux_x86_64'), ('cp34', 'abi3', 'linux_x86_64'), ('cp36', 'none', 'any'), ('cp3', 'none', 'any'), ('cp35', 'none', 'any'), ('cp34', 'none', 'any'), ('cp33', 'none', 'any'), ...]

I hope these steps works for you.

-2

I also have this problem. But I made a mistake following the previous approach. enter image description hereTypeError: get_supported() missing 1 required positional argument: 'archive_root' ,The solution is to add parameter win_amd64 in get_supported().

import wheel.pep425tags as w
print(w.get_supported("win_amd64")
3
  • 3
    Please don't post only code as answer, but also provide an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually more helpful and of better quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. Nov 28, 2020 at 13:34
  • Thank you for your reminder. I just registered and tried to propose my own solution for the first time. I will do better. Dec 3, 2020 at 14:54
  • 1
    This is gone since April 2020 and it is clearly stated in wheel's README that there is no stable API.
    – wim
    Mar 29, 2022 at 15:52
-2

THIS INFO IS OUTDATED

A bash one-liner, good for both Py2.7 & Py3.6 with pip-18.1:

python3 -c "import wheel.pep425tags as w; print(w.get_supported())" |sed -zE 's/\),/),\n/g'
3
  • 2
    This is gone since April 2020 and it is clearly stated in wheel's README that there is no stable API.
    – wim
    Mar 29, 2022 at 15:55
  • There is no need to vote for deletion for outdated answers, when they are clearly marked as such. The code, links and explanations, can still be useful.
    – not2qubit
    Oct 21, 2022 at 11:45
  • I disagree that adding a bit of sed around an already existing answer is a useful contribution. If anything it could be an edit to that answer. Anyway both python 2.7 and 3.6 are EOL now.
    – wim
    Oct 21, 2022 at 19:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.